April 19

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Quotes of the day from previous years:

2004 
Materialists and madmen never have doubts. ~ G. K. Chesterton
2005 
Patience is a necessary ingredient of genius. ~ Benjamin Disraeli (died 19 April 1881)
2006 
By the rude bridge that arched the flood,
Their flag to April's breeze unfurled;
Here once the embattled farmers stood;
And fired the shot heard round the world.

~ Ralph Waldo Emerson (The Battles of Lexington and Concord were fought on 19 April 1775)
2007
Children say that people are hung sometimes for speaking the truth. ~ Jehanne Darc (Joan of Arc) (Official Beatification by the Roman Catholic Church in 1903)
2008
When you study natural science and the miracles of creation, if you don't turn into a mystic you are not a natural scientist. ~ Albert Hofmann (for Bicycle Day)
2009
Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. ~ Yeshua (Jesus Christ) (Easter Sunday by the reckonings of the Eastern Orthodox traditions 2009
2010
I share the belief of many of my contemporaries that the spiritual crisis pervading all spheres of Western industrial society can be remedied only by a change in our world view. We shall have to shift from the materialistic, dualistic belief that people and their environment are separate, toward a new consciousness of an all-encompassing reality, which embraces the experiencing ego, a reality in which people feel their oneness with animate nature and all of creation. ~ Albert Hofmann‎ (for Bicycle Day)
2011
We painters use the same license as poets and madmen. ~ Paolo Veronese
2012
I do not yet want to form a hypothesis to test, because as soon as you make a hypothesis, you become prejudiced. Your mind slides into a groove, and once it is in that groove, has difficulty noticing anything outside of it. During this time, my sense must be sharp; that is the main thing — to be sharp, yet open. ~ Bernd Heinrich
2013
Of greatest significance to me has been the insight that I attained as a fundamental understanding from all of my LSD experiments: what one commonly takes as "the reality," including the reality of one's own individual person, by no means signifies something fixed, but rather something that is ambiguous — that there is not only one, but that there are many realities, each comprising also a different consciousness of the ego.
~ Albert Hofmann‎‎ ~
2014
There is a beauty in discovery. There is mathematics in music, a kinship of science and poetry in the description of nature, and exquisite form in a molecule. Attempts to place different disciplines in different camps are revealed as artificial in the face of the unity of knowledge. All literate men are sustained by the philosopher, the historian, the political analyst, the economist, the scientist, the poet, the artisan and the musician.
~ Glenn T. Seaborg ~
2015 
Rank or add further suggestions…

Ranking system:

4 : Excellent - should definitely be used.
3 : Very Good - strong desire to see it used.
2 : Good - some desire to see it used.
1 : Acceptable - but with no particular desire to see it used.
0 : Not acceptable - not appropriate for use as a quote of the day.


Suggestions[edit]

War may sometimes be a necessary evil. But no matter how necessary, it is always an evil, never a good. We will not learn how to live together in peace by killing each other's children. ~ Jimmy Carter


Byron was dead! I thought the whole world was at an end. I thought everything was over and finished for everyone — that nothing else mattered. I remembered I walked out alone, and carved "Byron is dead" into the sandstone. - Alfred Tennyson

  • Byron died on April 19, 1824
  • 3 InvisibleSun 00:02, 13 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 23:56, 22 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 00:14, 18 April 2009 (UTC)

If they had said that the sun or the moon had gone out of the heavens, it could not have struck me with the idea of a more awful and dreary blank in creation than the words: "Byron is dead!" - Jane Welsh Carlyle


I paint my pictures with all the considerations which are natural to my intelligence, and according as my intelligence understands them. ~ Paolo Veronese

  • 2 Zarbon 04:34, 13 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 00:14, 18 April 2009 (UTC)

Age is deformed, youth unkind,
We scorn their bodies, they our mind. ~ Thomas Bastard

  • 3 Zarbon 04:34, 13 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 00:14, 18 April 2009 (UTC)

A good film is one that requires the viewer to create, through an orchestration of impressions, the meaning of its events. It is, in the end, our ability to create meaning out of the raw experience of life that makes us human. It is the exercise of our faculty to discover meaning which is the purpose of art. The didactic imparting of moral or political messages is emphatically not the purpose of art — that is what we call propaganda. ~ Peter Chung

  • 3 Zarbon 04:34, 13 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 00:14, 18 April 2009 (UTC)

For right will alwayes live, and rise at length,
But wrong can never take deepe roote to last. ~ Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset

  • 3 Zarbon 04:34, 13 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 00:14, 18 April 2009 (UTC) with a lean toward 4.

The wrathfull winter proching on apace,
With blustering blasts had all ybarde the treene,
And olde Saturnus, with his frosty face
With chilling cold had pearst the tender greene. ~ Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset

  • 2 Zarbon 04:34, 13 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 00:14, 18 April 2009 (UTC) but this might be better as a suggestion towards the end of fall, rather than in spring...

And sorrowing I to see the sommer flowers,
The lively greene, the lusty lease, forlorne,
The sturdy trees so shattred with the showers,
The fieldes so fade, that florisht so beforne:
It taught mee well, all earthly things be borne
To dye the death: for nought long time may last:
The sommer's beauty yeeldes to winter's blast. ~ Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset

  • 2 Zarbon 04:34, 13 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 1 Kalki 00:14, 18 April 2009 (UTC)

His drinke, the running streame, his cup, the bare
Of his palme cloasde, his bed, the hard cold ground:
To this poore life was Misery ybound. ~ Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset

  • 3 Zarbon 04:34, 13 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 1 Kalki 00:14, 18 April 2009 (UTC)

Crookebackt hee was, toothshaken, and blere eyed,
Went on three feete, and somtyme, crept on fowre,
With olde lame boanes, that ratled by his syde,
His scalpe all pild, and hee with eld forlore:
His withred fist still knocking at Death's dore,
Fumbling, and driveling, as hee drawes his breath,
For briefe, the shape and messenger of Death. ~ Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset

  • 3 Zarbon 04:34, 13 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 1 Kalki 00:14, 18 April 2009 (UTC)

Conditions are seldom ideal, and if one waits long enough for ideal conditions one is just making excuses. ~ Bernd Heinrich

  • 3 Kalki 00:14, 18 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 15:19, 18 April 2009 (UTC)

Language is not a handmaiden to perception; it is perception; it gives shape to what would otherwise be inert and dead. ~ Stanley Fish


The idea - the core idea of humanism - is that the act of reading about great deeds will lead you to imitate them,... ~ Stanley Fish