Anger

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Anger is a common emotional response to real or imagined threats or harm to oneself or others, characterized by a desire, whether internalized or expressed, to engage in aggressive retaliation.

Quotes[edit]

  • In the beginning, the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.
    • Douglas Adams, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, chapter 1. (Second novel of the The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series).
  • Men often make up in wrath what they want in reason.
    • William R. Alger, reported in Maturin Murray Ballou, Treasury of thought: Forming an encyclopedia of quotations from Ancient and Modern Authors (1884), p. 23.
  • Iratus semplar plus putat posse facere quam possit.
  • Anger makes dull men witty, but it keeps them poor.
    • Francis Bacon, Apophthegms (1679); first published in the Remains, No, IV (stated to have been made by Queen Elizabeth to a Sir Edward, last name not reported).
  • Dangers by being despised grow great.
    • Edmund Burke, speech on the Petition of the Unitarians, 1792.
  • Nursing her wrath to keep it warm.
  • Great, strong, spiritual love — which is always at the same time a genuine, unsentimental love of man — cannot be without wrath. ... Anger can no more be separated from love than flame and heat can from fire. Love and anger are a single fire of the Spirit.
    • Constantin Brunner, in Our Christ : The Revolt of the Mystical Genius (1921), as translated by Graham Harrison and Michael Wex, edited by A. M. Rappaport, p. 169.
Buddha:Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with intent of throwing its at someone else; you are the one who gets burned.
  • Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with intent of throwing its at someone else; you are the one who gets burned.
  • Take away the love and the anger,
    And a little piece of hope holding us together.

    Looking for a moment that'll never happen,
    Living in the gap between past and future.
    Take away the stone and the timber,
    And a little piece of rope won't hold it together.
  • When anger rises, think of the consequences.
    • Confucius, as quoted in Yu-p'u Wang The Sacred Edict: Containing Sixteen Maxims of the Emperor Kang-He (1817), p. 298
  • Heav'n has no rage, like love to hatred turn'd.
    Nor Hell a fury, like a woman scorn'd.
  • Be not hasty in thy spirit to be angry: for anger resteth in the bosom of fools
  • Anger is one of the sinews of the soul; he that wants it hath a maimed mind.
    • Thomas Fuller, The Holy State and the Prophane State (1642), book III, 8, "Anger".
  • Ira furor brevis est: animum rege: qui nisi paret imperat.
    • Anger is momentary madness, so control your passion or it will control you.
    • Horace, Epistles, I. 2. 62.
  • When you are angry, it means you, yourself are unhappy. Even if you are wronged, you are still making yourself unhappy if you feel anger.
  • The chimps are infected! In order to cure, you must first understand - they're infected with Rage!
  • From hell's heart I stab at thee; for hate's sake I spit my last breath at thee.
  • There are three things all wise men fear: the sea in storm, a night with no moon, and the anger of a gentle man.
  • Being once chaf'd, he cannot
    Be rein'd again to temperance; then he speaks
    What's in his heart.
  • What sudden anger's this? How have I reap'd it?
    He parted frowning from me, as if ruin
    Leap'd from his eyes: So looks the chafed lion
    Upon the daring huntsman that has gall'd him;
    Then makes him nothing.
  • You are yoked with a lamb,
    That carries anger as the flint bears fire;
    Who, much enforced, shows a hasty spark.
    And straight is cold again.
  • Touch me with noble anger!
    And let not women's weapons, water drops,
    Stain my man's cheeks.
  • The brain may devise laws for the blood; but a hot temper leaps o'er a cold decree: such a hare is madness the youth, to skip o'er the meshes of good counsel, the cripple.
  • It engenders choler, planteth anger;
    And better 'twere that both of us did fast,
    Since, of ourselves, ourselves are choleric,
    Than feed it with such over-roasted flesh.
  • When you're pushed, killing is easy as breathing.
    • Art Monterastelli and Sylvester Stallone, Rambo (2008).
  • There are things that must evoke our anger to show we care. It is what we do with that anger. If we direct that energy we can use it positively or destructively.
    • Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Daily Express, 29th October 2008.
  • We have heard much of Faraday's gentleness and sweetness and tenderness. It is all true, but it is very incomplete. You cannot resolve a powerful nature into these elements, and Faraday's character would have been less admirable than it was had it not embraced forces and tendencies to which the silky adjectives "gentle" and "tender" would by no means apply. Underneath his sweetness and gentleness was the heat of a volcano. He was a man of excitable and fiery nature; but through high self-discipline he had converted the fire into a central glow and motive power of life, instead of permitting it to waste itself in useless passion. "He that is slow to anger" saith the sage, "is greater than the mighty, and he that ruleth his own spirit than he that taketh a city." Faraday was not slow to anger, but he completely ruled his own spirit, and thus, though he took no cities, he captivated all hearts.
    • John Tyndall, in Faraday as a Discoverer (1868) "Points of Character", p. 37.
  • Usually, when people are sad, they don’t do anything. They just cry over their condition. But when they get angry, they bring about a change.
    • Malcolm X , Malcolm X Speaks (1965), p. 107.

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations[edit]

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 27-28.
  • I was angry with my friend:
    I told my wrath, my wrath did end.
    I was angry with my foe;
    I told it not, my wrath did grow.
  • Alas! they had been friends in youth;
    But whispering tongues can poison truth,
    And constancy lives in realms above;
    And life is thorny, and youth is vain;
    And to be wrothe with one we love
    Doth work like madness in the brain.
  • Beware the fury of a patient man.
    • John Dryden, Absalom and Achitophel (1681), Part I, line 1005.
  • A man deep-wounded may feel too much pain
    To feel much anger.
  • Anger seeks its prey,—
    Something to tear with sharp-edged tooth and claw,
    Likes not to go off hungry, leaving Love
    To feast on milk and honeycomb at will.
  • Be ye angry, and sin not: let not the sun go down upon your wrath.
    • Ephesians, IV. 26.
  • Craignez la colère de la colombe.
    • Beware the anger of the dove.
    • French Proverb. See Quitard's Dictionary of Proverbs.
  • Anger, which, far sweeter than trickling drops of honey, rises in the bosom of a man like smoke.
    • Homer, The Iliad, XVIII, 108.
  • Fœnum habet in cornu.
    • He has hay on his horns.
    • Horace, Satires, I. 4. 34.
  • Trahit ipse furoris
    Impetus, et visum est lenti quæsisse nocentem.
    • They are borne along by the violence of their rage, and think it is a waste of time to ask who are guilty.
    • Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia, II, 109.
  • Nemo me impune lacessit.
    • No man provokes me with impunity.
    • Motto of the Order of the Thistle.
  • Quamlibet infirmas adjuvat ira manus.
    • Anger assists hands however weak.
    • Ovid, Amorum (16 BC), I. 7. 66.
  • Ut fragilis glacies interit ira mora.
    • Like fragile ice anger passes away in time.
    • Ovid, Ars Amatoria, I. 374.
  • He that is slow to anger is better than the mighty; and he that ruleth his spirit than he that taketh a city.
    • Proverbs, XVI. 32.
  • Anger wishes that all mankind had only one neck; love, that it had only one heart; grief, two tear-glands; and pride, two bent knees.
  • Dem tauben Grimm, der keinen Führer hört.
  • No pale gradations quench his ray,
    No twilight dews his wrath allay.
  • Quamvis tegatur proditur vultu furor.
    • Anger, though concealed, is betrayed by the countenance.
    • Seneca, Hippolytus, CCCLXIII.
  • Ne frena animo permitte calenti;
    Da spatium, tenuemque moram; male cuncta ministrat
    Impetus.
    • Give not reins to your inflamed passions; take time and a little delay; impetuosity manages all things badly.
    • Statius, Thebais, X, 703.
  • Not die here in a rage, like a poisoned rat in a hole.
  • Furor fit læsa sæpius patientia.
    • Patience provoked often turns to fury.
    • Syrus, Maxims, 178.
  • Senseless, and deformed,
    Convulsive Anger storms at large; or pale,
    And silent, settles into fell revenge.
  • Furor arma ministrat.
    • Their rage supplies them with weapons.
    • Virgil, Æneid (29-19 BC), I, 150.
  • Tantæne animis cœlestibus iræ.
    • Can heavenly minds such anger entertain?
    • Virgil, Æneid (29-19 BC), I, 11.

Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895)[edit]

Quotes reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 13-14.
  • The sun should not set upon our anger, neither should he rise upon our confidence.
  • The proud man hath no God; the envious man hath no neighbor; the angry man hath not himself.
  • He submits himself to be seen through a microscope, who suffers himself to be caught in a fit of passion.
  • There was a man here last night — you needn't be afraid that I shall mention his name — who said that his will was given up to God, and who got mad because the omnibus was full, and he had to walk a mile to his lodgings.
  • When I had twice or thrice made a resolute resistance to anger, the like befell me that did the Thebans; who, having once foiled the Lacedemonians, never after lost so much as one battle which they fought against them.
  • An unsanctified temper is a fruitful source of error, and a mighty impediment to truth.
  • Our passions are like convulsion fits, which make us stronger for the time, but leave us weaker forever after.
  • If anger proceeds from a great cause, it turns to fury; if from a small cause, it is peevishness; and so is always either terrible or ridiculous.

External links[edit]

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