Betrayal

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Betrayal (or treachery) is the breaking or violation of a presumptive contract, trust, or confidence that produces moral and psychological conflict within a relationship amongst individuals, between organizations or between individuals and organizations. Often betrayal is the act of supporting a rival group, or it is a complete break from previously decided upon or presumed norms by one party from the others. Someone who betrays others is commonly called a traitor or betrayer. Betrayal is also a commonly used literary element and is often associated with or used as a plot twist.

Sourced[edit]

  • Any form of real betrayal can be final. Dishonesty can be final. Selling out is final. But you are just talking now. Death is what is really final.
  • Every great work of art … is a celebration, an act of insubordination against the betrayals, horrors and infidelities of life.
  • Just for the record, the weather today is partly suspicious with chances of betrayal.
  • On this tenth day of June, 1940, the hand that held the dagger has struck it into the back of its neighbor.
    • Franklin D. Roosevelt, noting Italy's declaration of war against France on that day, during the commencement address at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville (June 10, 1940); reported in The Public Papers and Addresses of Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1940 (1941), p. 263.
  • I am in blood
    Stepp'd in so far, that, should I wade no more,
    Returning were as tedious as go o'er.
  • The act of treachery is an art, but the traitor himself is a piece of shit.

External links[edit]

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