Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet

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The greatest weakness of all weaknesses is to fear too much to appear weak.

Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet (September 27, 1627April 12, 1704) was a French bishop, theologian, and court preacher. Bossuet was one of the first to advocate the theory of political absolutism; he made the argument that government was divine and that kings received their power from God.

Sourced[edit]

  • The inexorable boredom that is at the core of life.
    • As quoted in A Book of French Quotations (1963) edited by Norbert Guterman
  • Honor is like the eye, which cannot suffer the least impurity without damage. It is a precious stone, the price of which is lessened by a single flaw.
    • Quoted in "The Forbes Book of Business Quotations" (1997) by Edward C. Goodman, Ted Goodman , p. 411
  • Only great souls know the grandeur there is in charity.
    • Quoted in Quote Unquote : A Handbook of Quotations (2007) by M. P. Singh, p. 96

Politics Drawn from the Very Words of Holy Scripture (1709)[edit]

Politique tirée de l'Écriture sainte (1709)
  • The greatest weakness of all weaknesses is to fear too much to appear weak.

External links[edit]

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