Anatole Broyard

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Anatole Broyard (July 16, 1920October 11, 1990) was an American literary critic for the New York Times. He is notable for denying his African ancestry by passing as white.

Sourced[edit]

  • It is one of the paradoxes of American literature that our writers are forever looking back with love and nostalgia at lives they couldn’t wait to leave.
    • New York Times 16th March 1973
  • An aphorism is a generalization of sorts, and our present-day writers seem more at home with the particular.
    • ‘Wisdom of Aphorisms’, New York Times, 30th April 1983
  • The contents of someone's bookcase are part of his history, like an ancestral portrait.
    • ‘About Books, Recoiling, Rereading, Retelling’, New York Times, February 22, 1987
  • A good book is never exhausted. It goes on whispering to you from the wall.
    • ‘About Books, Recoiling, Rereading, Retelling’, New York Times, February 22, 1987

External links[edit]

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