Children's literature

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A mother reads to her children, depicted by Jessie Willcox Smith in a cover illustration of a volume of fairy tales written in the mid to late 19th century.

Children's literature or juvenile literature includes stories, books, and poems that are enjoyed by children. Modern children's literature is classified in two different ways: genre or the intended age of the reader.

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  • Children's literature cannot be created without a close attachment with the children and they should be given moral education through entertainment.
    • Harapriya Barukial Borgohain, writer, upon receiving the Dharmeswar Kataki memorial children's literature award at a ceremony at Tezpur Sahitya Sabha Bhawan — cited in: "Awareness generated on children's literature". Assam Tribune (Guwahati, India: Al Bawaba (Middle East) Ltd.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand). April 16, 2014. 
  • Just creation of children's literature is not enough, we will have to be aware of the wrong spellings and sentence structures. Otherwise, the children wouldn't be satisfied.
    • Harapriya Barukial Borgohain, writer, upon receiving the Dharmeswar Kataki memorial children's literature award at a ceremony at Tezpur Sahitya Sabha Bhawan — cited in: "Awareness generated on children's literature". Assam Tribune (Guwahati, India: Al Bawaba (Middle East) Ltd.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand). April 16, 2014. 
  • Children's literature often bears clear evidence of its political leanings. Robinson Crusoe (written for adults but appropriated by younger readers) was about a white man who taught a black man how to behave as much as possible like a decent Englishman. The Jungle Book stories feature Mowgli, who learns the law of the jungle then dominates all of them.
    • Jay Heale (November 18, 2013). "Using kid literature to preach equality; Works must carry dream of united SA Works must carry dream of united SA". Pretoria News (South Africa: Independent Online; www.pretorianews.co.za; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand): p. 8; Section: news. 
  • Children's literature is not political? What rubbish. If it reflects the society we live in, it is political. For years, the only local books about black children featured them living in a round mud hut in a folktale or wandering around chatting up lions and leopards. Then our authors were gradually allowed by our publishers to dream a little, to speak from the heart.
    • Jay Heale (November 18, 2013). "Using kid literature to preach equality; Works must carry dream of united SA Works must carry dream of united SA". Pretoria News (South Africa: Independent Online; www.pretorianews.co.za; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand): p. 8; Section: news. 
  • Children, parents, teachers and schools must always be involved. It is important that good habits and the pleasure of reading can and must be instilled in us when we are young.
    • Atle Hetland (May 9, 2013). "Literature for the people". The Nation (Karachi, Pakistan: Asianet-Pakistan; www.nation.com.pk; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand) 27 (72). 
  • The very first humans anthropomorphized the trees and the sun. It's just what we do. I don't think children's literature is teaching children to graft human emotions onto animals.
    • J. Timothy Hunt, author who uses the pen-name Tim Beiser — cited in: Graham Slaughter (March 28, 2014). "Is Winnie the Pooh hindering children's ability to learn science? Humanlike animals in books can confuse kids, says study, but authors strongly disagree". The Toronto Star (Torstar Syndication Services, a division of Toronto Star Newspapers Ltd.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand): p. L3. 
  • Children's literature is a key educational source in creating an inclusive culture.
    • Mark McGlashan, Lancaster University — cited in: Graeme Paton, Education Editor (July 10, 2013). "Same-sex parents 'should be featured in school books'; Children's books used in primary schools should feature same-sex parents to help teach tolerance among youngsters, according to an academic". The Telegraph Online (Telegraph Group Ltd., www.telegraph.co.uk; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand). 
  • A 4-year-old reading a book about a talking bear, or in my case a bear that hugs trees, it's an innocent little fantasy. If a child loves picking up that book every night, I think the positive outweighs the negative - if there is any negative. I'd strongly argue there isn't.
    • Nicholas Oldland, author of Big Bear Hug — cited in: Graham Slaughter (March 28, 2014). "Is Winnie the Pooh hindering children's ability to learn science? Humanlike animals in books can confuse kids, says study, but authors strongly disagree". The Toronto Star (Torstar Syndication Services, a division of Toronto Star Newspapers Ltd.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand): p. L3. 
  • What mostly attracts me to children's literature is how complex it is We often have a misconception that children's literature is literature for adults with simpler language, and happy endings.
    • Victoria Ford Smith, assistant professor at University of Connecticut, specialist in children's literature — cited in: Jill Martin Wrenn (April 28, 2014). "How to keep kids reading through the summer". CNN Wire (CNN; CNN Newsource Sales, Inc.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand). 
  • Really, children's literature brings their fears and frustrations to life.
    • Jill Martin Wrenn (April 28, 2014). "How to keep kids reading through the summer". CNN Wire (CNN; CNN Newsource Sales, Inc.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand). 
  • This is one reason why children's literature is so important: it often begins with laughter.
    • Damon Young (March 22, 2014). "Pain comes before a punchline". The Age (Melbourne, Australia: Fairfax Media Publications Pty Limited. www.theage.com.au.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand): p. 13; Section: Arts and Entertainment. 
  • One of the most common epithets for children's books is 'fun'. It suggests a certain luxurious triviality: what's fun is all that's not serious. And certainly, many books are just that: escapes from the serious business of living.
    • Damon Young (March 22, 2014). "Pain comes before a punchline". The Age (Melbourne, Australia: Fairfax Media Publications Pty Limited. www.theage.com.au.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand): p. 13; Section: Arts and Entertainment. 
  • This is one of the triumphs of kids' books in general: a bonding in incomprehensibility.
    • Damon Young (March 22, 2014). "Pain comes before a punchline". The Age (Melbourne, Australia: Fairfax Media Publications Pty Limited. www.theage.com.au.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand): p. 13; Section: Arts and Entertainment. 
  • But all in all, the fun of children's books is often altruistic: it is a lesson in how to cope with an imperfect and often impenetrable life - and, as we chortle together, a form of intimacy.
    • Damon Young (March 22, 2014). "Pain comes before a punchline". The Age (Melbourne, Australia: Fairfax Media Publications Pty Limited. www.theage.com.au.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand): p. 13; Section: Arts and Entertainment. 

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