Christian Doppler

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Christian Doppler

Christian Andreas Doppler (29 November 180317 March 1853) was an Austrian mathematician and physicist. He is most famous for what is now called the Doppler effect, which is the apparent change in frequency and wavelength of a wave as perceived by an observer moving relative to the wave's source.

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  • There have been applied sciences throughout the ages. … However this so-called practice was not much more than paper in nearly all of these cases, and the various applied sciences were only lacking a bagatelle, namely proper scientific practice. The applied sciences show the application of theoretic doctrines in existing events; but that is precisely what it does, it merely shows. Whereas the scientific practice autonomously puts to use these theories.
    • in his review of Joseph Beskiba's textbook, published in the Österreichische Blätter für Literatur und Kunst (September 7, 1844), as quoted by Peter Schuster (2005). Moving the stars: Christian Doppler, his life, his works and principle, and the world after. Living edition. p. 78. ISBN 3901585052. 

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