Coventry Mystery Plays

From Wikiquote
Jump to: navigation, search

The Coventry Mystery Plays or Coventry Corpus Christi Pageants are a cycle of miracle plays, of which only two survive. They were being performed by 1392, but reached their final form in the following century. They are believed to have been an influence on Shakespeare.

  • As I out rode this enderes night,
    Of thre ioli sheppardes I saw a sight,
    And all abowte there fold a star shone bright;
    They sange "terli terlowe";
    So mereli the sheppards ther pipes can blow.
    • As I rode out this passing night,
      Of three jolly shepherds I saw a sight;
      And all about their fold, a star shone bright.
      They sang terly, terlow!
      So merrily the shepherds their pipes can blow.
    • The Shearmen and Tailors' Pageant, "As I rode out this enderes night", line 1; translation from John Gassner (ed.) Medieval and Tudor Drama (New York: Bantam, 1963) p. 133.
  • By by, lully lullay, þow littell tyne child,
    By by, lully lullay.
    • By-by, lulla, lullay, ye little tiny child,
      By-by, lulla, lullay.
    • The Shearmen and Tailors' Pageant, "The Coventry Carol", line 2; translation from John Gassner (ed.) Medieval and Tudor Drama (New York: Bantam, 1963) p. 142.
  • Herod, the king, in his raging,
    Chargid he hath this day
    His men of might in his owne sight
    All yonge children to slay.
    That wo is me, pore child, for thee,
    And ever morne and say
    For thi parting nether say nor singe
    By by, lully lullay.
    • Herod the king, in his raging,
      Charged he hath this day,
      His men of might, in his own sight,
      All young children to slay.
      Then woe is me, poor child, for thee
      And ever mourn I may;
      For thy parting, neither say nor sing,
      By-by, lulla, lullay.
    • The Shearmen and Tailors' Pageant, "The Coventry Carol", line 8; translation from John Gassner (ed.) Medieval and Tudor Drama (New York: Bantam, 1963) p. 143.
  • The weykist gothe eyuer to the walle.
    • The weakest goes ever to the wall!
    • The Weavers' Pageant, line 447; translation from Keith Miles The Coventry Mystery Plays (London: Heinemann, 1981) p. 33.

External links[edit]

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about: