Dora Read Goodale

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Dora Read Goodale (1866–1915) was an American poet along with her sister of Elaine Goodale Eastman. The sisters published their first poetry as children still living at home, and were included in Edmund Clarence Stedman's classic An American Anthology (1900).

Sourced[edit]

  • The Autumn wood the aster knows,
    The empty nest, the wind that grieves,
    The sunlight breaking thro' the shade,
    The squirrel chattering overhead,
    The timid rabbits lighter tread
    Among the rustling leaves.
    • Asters, reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 45.
  • And in the woods a fragrance rare
    Of wild azaleas fills the air,
    And richly tangled overhead
    We see their blossoms sweet and red.
    • Spring Scatters Far and Wide, reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 53.
  • Whence is yonder flower so strangely bright?
    Would the sunset's last reflected shine
    Flame so red from that dead flush of light?
    Dark with passion is its lifted line,
    Hot, alive, amid the falling night.
    • Cardinal Flower, reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 89.
  • Crimson clover I discover
    By the garden gate,
    And the bees about her hover,
    But the robins wait.
    Sing, robins, sing,
    Sing a roundelay,—
    'Tis the latest flower of Spring
    Coming with the May!
    • Red Clover; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 122.
  • I love the fair lilies and roses so gay,
    They are rich in their pride and their splendor;
    But still more do I love to wander away
    To the meadow so sweet,
    Where down at my feet,
    The harebell blooms modest and tender.
    • Queen Harebell; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 353.
  • All the woodland path is broken
    By warm tints along the way,
    And the low and sunny slope
    Is alive with sudden hope
    When there comes the silent token
    Of an April day,—
    Blue hepatica!
    • Hepatica, reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 365.

External links[edit]

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