Drink

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"Grok" means "to drink." ~ Robert A. Heinlein

Drinks, or beverages, are liquids specifically prepared for human consumption. Drinking is the act of ingesting liquids into the body through the mouth. Liquids, especially water, are required for many of life’s processes.

See also:
Alcoholic beverages
Beer
Drunkenness
Water
Wine

Quotes[edit]

Some people drink from the fountain of knowledge, others just gargle. ~ Robert Newton Anthony
I never drink water because of the disgusting things that fish do in it. ~ W. C. Fields
Here are your waters and your watering place.
Drink and be whole again beyond confusion. ~ Robert Frost
An intelligent man is sometimes forced to be drunk to spend time with his fools. ~ Ernest Hemingway
Yesterday This day’s madness did prepare;Tomorrow’s Silence, Triumph or Despair:
Drink! for you know not whence you came nor why:
drink! for you know not why you go, nor where. ~ Omar Khayyam
The ravens brought him bread and flesh in the morning, and bread and flesh in the evening; and he drank of the brook. ~ Book of Kings
Don't give up until you drink from the silver cup
And ride that highway in the sky. ~ Dan and Catherine Peek
I began to think vodka was my drink at last. It didn’t taste like anything, but it went straight down into my stomach like a sword swallowers’ sword and made me feel powerful and godlike. ~ Sylvia Plath
  • I hear Socrates saying that the best seasoning for food is hunger; for drink, thirst.
    • Cicero, De Finibus Bonorum et Malorum, II. 28
  • Love, with very young people, is a heartless business. We drink at that age from thirst, or to get drunk; it is only later in life that we occupy ourselves with the individuality of our wine.
  • I have kept hidden in the instep arch
    Of an old cedar at the waterside
    A broken drinking goblet like the Grail
    Under a spell so the wrong ones can't find it
    ,
    So can't get saved, as Saint Mark says they mustn't.
    (I stole the goblet from the children's playhouse.)
    Here are your waters and your watering place.
    Drink and be whole again beyond confusion.
  • Let us eat and drink; for to-morrow we shall die.
  • Take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink; nor yet for your body, what ye shall put on. Is not the life more than meat, and the body than raiment? Behold the fowls of the air: for they sow not, neither do they reap, nor gather into barns; yet your heavenly Father feedeth them. Are ye not much better than they?
  • And the word of the Lord came unto him, saying, Get thee hence, and turn thee eastward, and hide thyself by the brook Cherith, that is before Jordan. And it shall be, that thou shalt drink of the brook; and I have commanded the ravens to feed thee there. So he went and did according unto the word of the Lord: for he went and dwelt by the brook Cherith, that is before Jordan. And the ravens brought him bread and flesh in the morning, and bread and flesh in the evening; and he drank of the brook.
  • The fool took a cup from beside his bed, filled it with water and handed it to the king. As the king began to drink, he realized his wound was healed. He looked in his hands and there was the Holy Grail, that which he sought all of his life. And he turned to the fool and said with amazement, "How can you find that which my brightest and bravest could not?" And the fool replied, "I don't know. I only knew that you were thirsty."
  • Mithridates, by frequently drinking poison, rendered it impossible for any poison to hurt him.
    • Martial, Epigrams (c. 80-104 AD), Book V, Epistle 76.
  • Why do alcoholics begin down the same hazardous road day after day? They are in search of that elusive window of well-being that opens when you drink your way out of a hangover and aren't yet drunk all over again. The alcoholic's day consists of trying to keep that window open.
  • Though we eat little flesh and drink no wine,
    Yet let's be merry
    ; we'll have tea and toast;
    Custards for supper, and an endless host
    Of syllabubs and jellies and mince-pies,
    And other such ladylike luxuries.
  • Bad men live that they may eat and drink, whereas good men eat and drink that they may live.

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