George Granville, 1st Baron Lansdowne

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Happy the man, of mortals happiest he,
Whose quiet mind from vain desires is free;
Whom neither hopes deceive, nor fears torment,
But lives at peace, within himself content;
In thought, or act, accountable to none
But to himself, and to the gods alone.

George Granville, 1st Baron Lansdowne (9 March 1666 – 29 January 1735) was an English poet, playwright, and politician who served as a Privy Counsellor from 1712.

Quotes[edit]

  • Of all pains, the greatest pain
    Is to love, and love in vain.
    • The British Enchanters (1705), Act III, scene iii.
  • Thy thoughts to nobler meditations give,
    And study how to die, not how to live.
    • Meditations on Death, Stanza 1; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 504.
  • 'Tis impious pleasure to delight in harm.
    And beauty should be kind, as well as charm.
    • To Myra, line 21; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), "Beauty", p. 57-63.
  • Since truth and constancy are vain,
    Since neither love, nor sense of pain,
    Nor force of reason, can persuade,
    Then let example be obey'd.
    • To Myra; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), "Example", p. 242-43.
  • Mankind, from Adam, have been women's fools;
    Women, from Eve, have been the devil's tools:
    Heaven might have spar'd one torment when we fell;
    Not left us women, or not threatened hell.
    • She-Gallants; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), "Women", p. 886-97.
  • Happy the man, of mortals happiest he,
    Whose quiet mind from vain desires is free;
    Whom neither hopes deceive, nor fears torment,
    But lives at peace, within himself content;
    In thought, or act, accountable to none
    But to himself, and to the gods alone.
    • Epistle to Mrs. Higgons (1690), line 79; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), "Contentment", p. 133-36.
  • But, oh! what mighty magician can assuage
    A woman's envy?
    • Progress of Beauty; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), "Envy", p. 226-27.
  • The kiss you take is paid by that you give:
    The joy is mutual, and I'm still in debt.
    • Heroic Love, Act V, scene 1; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), "Kissing", p. 416-19.
  • Whoe'er thou art, thy Lord and master see,
    Thou wast my Slave, thou art, or thou shalt be.
    • Inscription for a Figure representing the God of Love. See Genuine Works. (1732) I. 129. Version of a Greek couplet from the Greek Anthology.

External links[edit]