Grace

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Glory be to the Graces! ~ ‎Robert Herrick

Grace is a word referring to elegant movement, poise or balance, and also to free and undeserved favor, especially in Christian theology, in reference to the divine grace of God. It is derived from the Latin word gratus, and is also used to refer to any of the Gratiae or Charites of Greek and Roman mythology.

See also:
Gracefulness

Quotes[edit]

Will is to grace as the horse is to the rider. ~ Augustine of Hippo
Perhaps there will be a morning of grace for humanity. Perhaps there will be a morning of grace for me. ~ Eugène Ionesco
Christianity is just as lenient as it is austere, just as lenient, that is to say, infinitely lenient. When the infinite requirement is heard and upheld, heard and upheld in all its infinitude, then grace is offered, or rather grace offers itself, and to it the individual, each for himself, as I also do, can flee for refuge. ~ Søren Kierkegaard
Amazing grace! (how sweet the sound)
That sav'd a wretch like me!
I once was lost, but now am found,
Was blind, but now I see. ~ John Newton
  • Every time your enemy fires a curse, you must fire a blessing, and so you are to bombard back and forth with this kind of artillery. The mother grace of all the graces is Christian good-will.
    • Henry Ward Beecher, in Life Thoughts, Gathered from the Extemporaeous Discourses (1858), p. 274
  • Whatever he did, was done with so much ease,
    In him alone 'twas natural to please.
    • John Dryden, Absalom and Achitophel (1681), Part I, line 27
  • Let grace and goodness be the principal lodestone of thy affections. For love which hath ends, will have an end; whereas that which is founded on true virtue, will always continue.
    • Thomas Fuller, in The Holy State and the Prophane State (1642), this has sometimes been misattributed to John Dryden, as early as its occurrence in A Dictionary of Thoughts : Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations from the Best Authors of the World, both Ancient and Modern (1908) edited by Tryon Edwards
  • Grace is beauty in motion, or rather grace regulates the air, the attitudes and movements of beauty.
    • Henry Fuseli, Aphorism 43, in The Life and Writings of Henry Fuseli (1831) Vol. III, edited by John Knowles
  • Nature makes no parade of her means— hence all studied grace is unnatural.
    • Henry Fuseli, Aphorism 44, in The Life and Writings of Henry Fuseli (1831) Vol. III, edited by John Knowles
  • All actions and attitudes of children are graceful, because they are the luxuriant and immediate offspring of the moment — divested of affectation, and free from all pretence.
    • Henry Fuseli, Aphorism 45, in The Life and Writings of Henry Fuseli (1831) Vol. III, edited by John Knowles
  • Proportion, or symmetry, is the basis of beauty; propriety, of grace.
    • Henry Fuseli, Aphorism 46, in The Life and Writings of Henry Fuseli (1831) Vol. III, edited by John Knowles
  • Grace has been defined, the outward expression of the inward harmony of the soul.
  • Glory be to the Graces!
    That doe in publike places,
    Drive thence what ere encumbers,
    The listning to my numbers.

    Honour be to the Graces!
    Who doe with sweet embraces,
    Shew they are well contented
    With what I have invented.

    • Robert Herrick in "A Psalme or Hymne to the Graces" in Hesperides : Or the Works Both Human and Divine of Robert Herrick (1846), p. 70
  • Worship be to the Graces!
    Who do from sowre faces,
    And lungs that wo'd infect me,
    For evermore protect me.
    • Robert Herrick in "A Psalme or Hymne to the Graces" in Hesperides : Or the Works Both Human and Divine of Robert Herrick (1846), p. 70
  • Instead of giving the impression, in however small a degree, that there are such difficulties about Christianity that an apology for it is needed if men are to be persuaded to enter into it, rather to represent it as a thing so infinitely lofty, as in truth it is, that the apology belongs in another place, is required, that is to say, of us for the fact that we venture to call ourselves Christians, or it transforms itself into a contrite confession that we have God to thank if we merely assume to regard ourselves as a Christian. But neither must this ever be forgotten: Christianity is just as lenient as it is austere, just as lenient, that is to say, infinitely lenient. When the infinite requirement is heard and upheld, heard and upheld in all its infinitude, then grace is offered, or rather grace offers itself, and to it the individual, each for himself, as I also do, can flee for refuge.
  • 'Twas grace that taught my heart to fear,
    And grace my fears reliev'd;
    How precious did that grace appear,
    The hour I first believ'd!
  • Thro' many dangers, toils and snares,
    I have already come;
    'Tis grace has brought me safe thus far,
    And grace will lead me home.
  • You've told me the way, and now I'm trying to get there
    And this life sentence that I'm serving
    I admit, that I'm every bit deserving
    But the beauty of grace is that it makes life not fair.
  • Hail to thee, lady! and the grace of heaven,
    Before, behind thee and on every hand,
    Enwheel thee round!
  • For several virtues
    Have I lik'd several women; never any
    With so full soul, but some defect in her
    Did quarrel with the noblest grace she ow'd,
    And put it to the foil.
  • She carries a pearl
    In perfect condition.
    What once was hers,
    What once was friction,
    What left a mark,
    No longer stains,
    Because Grace makes beauty
    Out of ugly things.
  • Narcissus is the glory of his race:
    For who does nothing with a better grace?
  • When a person expends the least amount of motion on one action, that is grace.

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations[edit]

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 335.
  • There, but for the grace of God, goes John Bradford.
    • John Bradford (seeing a criminal pass by), in his Writings, Volume II. Pub. by Parker Society, Cambridge, 1853. Biog. notice, p. 13. Credited to him also by Dean Farrar, Eternal Hope, Fourth Sermon. S. O. VII. 269. 351. Credited also to Baxter, Bunyan, John Wesley.
  • An outward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual grace.
    • Book of Common Prayer, Catechism
  • Ye are fallen from grace.
    • Galatians, V, 4
  • Stately and tall he moves in the hall,
    The chief of a thousand for grace.
    • Kate Franklin, Life at Olympus, Godey's Lady's Book, Volume XXIII, p. 33
  • The three black graces, Law, Physic, and Divinity.
    • Horace and James Smith, Punch's Holiday

External links[edit]

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