Guido Guinizzelli

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Guido Guinizzelli (c. 1230–1276), born in Bologna, in present-day Emilia-Romagna, Northern Italy, was an Italian poet and 'founder' of the Dolce Stil Novo. He was the first to write in this new style of poetry writing, and thus is held to be the ipso facto founder.

Sourced[edit]

  • (Che) nessuna scienza
    Senz’ ammaestratura
    Non saglie in grande altura
    Per proprio sentimento.
    • Canzone. (Poeti del Primo Secolo, Firenze, 1816, Vol. I, p. 83).
    • Translation: For naught that we call science,
      If there be none to teach.
      Can by its own endeavours
      The highest summit reach.
    • Translation reported in Harbottle's Dictionary of quotations French and Italian (1904), p. 369.
  • Fere lo sol lo fango tutto ’l giorno;
    Vil riman, ne il sol perde colore.
    • Canzone. (Poeti del Primo Secolo, Firenze, 1816, p. 92).
    • Translation: Though the sun beat all day upon the mud,
      Still foul the mud remains and bright the sun.
    • Translation reported in Harbottle's Dictionary of quotations French and Italian (1904), p. 302.
  • A buon servente guiderdon non pere.
    • Sonetto. (Poeti del Primo Secolo, Firenze, 1816, p. 104).
    • The faithful servant shall his guerdon have.
    • Translation reported in Harbottle's Dictionary of quotations French and Italian (1904), p. 239.
  • Risguardiami; se sa legger d’amore,
    Ch’ io porto morte scritta nella faccia.
    • Sonetto. (Poeti del Primo Secolo, Firenze, 1816, Vol. I, p. 105).
    • Translation: Look on me! if canst read the signs of love,
      Thou’lt see that death is written in my face.
    • Translation reported in Harbottle's Dictionary of quotations French and Italian (1904), p. 407.

External links[edit]

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