Heinrich Baab

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Heinrich Baab (date of birth and death currently unknown) was a secretary and Gestapo chief of Frankfurt who received a sentence of life imprisonment in March, 1950 for his involvement in the Final Solution as the head of Division IIB2. Imprisoned from 1948 to 1973.[1][2]

Sourced[edit]

  • Don't worry about those Jewish bastards. You'll soon be on your way up the chimney and your troubles will be over.
    • To mothers, who were worried about the fate of their children. Quoted in "Gestapo: Instrument of Tyranny" - Page 118 - by Edward Crankshaw - History - 1956
  • I was an idealist in my profession. If I used such expression as 'Jewish bastard' or 'Jewish sow,' it simply meant that this official language had become so much a part of my flesh and blood that I saw nothing unusual in it. I never used anything but spiritual weapons in dealing with offenders.
    • To the prosecution at his trial in 1950. Quoted in "Gestapo: Instrument of Tyranny" - Page 118 - by Edward Crankshaw - History - 1956

About Baab[edit]

There was one young man who sat regularly in a spectator's seat about whom it was later testified that not one thread of his under or outer garments had retained its original color, so drenched were they by his own blood after a visit to Heinrich Baab in 1942.
  • This creature, this Baab, with his spiritual weapons, was in the end found guilty on fifty-five counts of murder, on twenty-one counts of attempted murder, on thirty counts of assault and battery, and a variety of lesser offences.
    • Edward Crankshaw
  • He had beaten and tortured, dragged shrieking children away from their mothers, despatched his quotas of human cargo in sealed box-cars to the frontier, until finally he was able to declare that there were no more Jews in Frankfurt.
    • Edward Crankshaw
  • There was one young man who sat regularly in a spectator's seat about whom it was later testified that not one thread of his under or outer garments had retained its original color, so drenched were they by his own blood after a visit to Heinrich Baab in 1942.
    • Kay Boyle in The Smoking Mountain (1951)

References[edit]

  1. Zeitschrift für Rechtspolitik 1969 "Heinrich Baab befindet sich seit dem 7. April 1948 in Haft, also mehr als 21 Jahre. Mildere Urteile Auch hier nur ein Beispiel aus der heutigen Praxis: Auf Grund von Anzeigen des Verurteilten Baab hat die Staatsanwaltschaft Frankfurt wegen der Judendeportationen aus Frankfurt zwischen 1941 und 1945 gegen neun weitere "
  2. 2004 "Im Jahre 1973 wurde Heinrich Baab durch den hessischen Justizminister begnadigt und aus der Haft entlassen"

External links[edit]