Jean-Luc Picard

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Let us make sure history never forgets the name ... Enterprise.

Jean-Luc Picard (13 July 2305–) is a character in the Star Trek fictional universe, the captain of the USS Enterprise-D and the Enterprise-E. He was played by British actor Patrick Stewart in the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation and subsequent films.

Quotes[edit]

These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its continuing mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no one has gone before!
Someone once told me that time was a predator that stalked us all our lives. But I rather believe that time is a companion who goes with us on the journey and reminds us to cherish every moment because they'll never come again. What we leave behind is not as important as how we've lived.
Reports of my assimilation are greatly exaggerated.
That is what it is to be human. To make yourself more than you are.
Seize the time... Live now! Make now always the most precious time. Now will never come again.
Things are only impossible until they're not!
There is a way out of every box, a solution to every puzzle; it's just a matter of finding it.
The Prime Directive is not just a set of rules; it is a philosophy ... and a very correct one. History has proven again and again that whenever mankind interferes with a less developed civilization, no matter how well intentioned that interference may be, the results are invariably disastrous.
We are what we are, and we're doing the best we can. It is not for you to set the standards by which we should be judged!
And the sky's the limit.
  • Make it so.
    • Catchphrase first used in "Encounter At Farpoint" (28 September 1987) by Gene Roddenberry, and thereafter used in many episodes and films, instructing a crew member to execute an order.
  • Engage.
    • Catchphrase first used in "Encounter At Farpoint" (28 September 1987) by Gene Roddenberry, and thereafter used in many episodes and films, instructing a crew member to execute an order sending the Enterprise on warp speed.
  • Tea. Earl Grey. Hot.
    • Catchphrase used in many episodes.
  • Someone once told me that time was a predator that stalked us all our lives. But I rather believe that time is a companion who goes with us on the journey and reminds us to cherish every moment because they'll never come again. What we leave behind is not as important as how we've lived. After all, Number One, we're only mortal.
  • Reports of my assimilation are greatly exaggerated.
  • Buried deep within you, beneath all the years of pain and anger, there is something that has never been nurtured: the potential to make yourself a better man. And that is what it is to be human. To make yourself more than you are. Oh, yes — I know you. There was a time you looked at the stars and dreamed of what might be.

Star Trek: The Next Generation[edit]

  • Space, the final frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its continuing mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no one has gone before!
    • Introduction spoken during the opening credits of each episode, derived from the introduction to the original Star Trek series. Both versions are by Gene Roddenberry; the original referred to a "five year mission" rather than a "continuing mission", and said "no man" rather than "no one".
  • Things are only impossible until they're not!
  • The Prime Directive is not just a set of rules; it is a philosophy ... and a very correct one. History has proven again and again that whenever mankind interferes with a less developed civilization, no matter how well intentioned that interference may be, the results are invariably disastrous.
    • "Symbiosis" (18 April 1988) by Robert Lewin
  • No being is so important that he can usurp the rights of another.
  • It is possible to commit no mistakes and still lose. That is not a weakness; that is life.
  • Being first at any cost is not always the point.
    • "Tin Man" (23 March 1990) by Dennis Putman Bailey and David Bischoff
  • There are times, sir, when men of good conscience cannot blindly follow orders. You acknowledge their sentience, but ignore their personal liberties and freedom. Order a man to turn his child over to the state? Not while I'm his captain.
  • You may test that assumption at your convenience.
    • "Sins of the Father)" (19 March 1990) by Drew Deighan; after being challenged by a Klingon to fight who said that Picard as a Federation officer would not fight.
  • Imprisonment is an injury, regardless of how you justify it.
    • "Allegiance" (26 March 1990) by Richard Manning and Hans Beimler
  • You know, there are some words I've known since I was a schoolboy. "With the first link, the chain is forged. The first speech censured, the first thought forbidden, the first freedom denied, chains us all irrevocably." Those words were uttered by Judge Aaron Satie as wisdom and warning. The first time any man's freedom is trodden on, we're all damaged.
  • The road from legitimate suspicion to rampant paranoia is very much shorter than we think.
Jean-Luc Picard: We think we've come so far. Torture of heretics, burning of witches, is all ancient history. Then, before you can blink an eye, suddenly, it threatens to start all over again.
Worf: I believed her. I... helped her. I did not see her for what she was.
Jean-Luc Picard: Mr. Worf, villains who twirl their moustaches are easy to spot. Those who clothe themselves in good deeds are well-camouflaged.
Worf: I think... after yesterday people will not be so ready to trust her.
Jean-Luc Picard: Maybe. But she, or someone like her, will always be with us. Waiting for the right climate in which to flourish, spreading fear in the name of righteousness. [...] Vigilance, Mr. Worf. That is the price we must continually pay.
  • I'd be delighted to offer any advice I have on understanding women. When I have some, I'll let you know.
    • "In Theory" (3 June 1991) by Joe Menosky and Ronald D. Moore
  • There are four lights!
    • "Chain of Command" (21 December 1992) by Frank Abatemarco
    • Picard had been captured by the Cardassians and had been tortured. The torturer had constantly asked Picard how many lights did he see. Every time Picard answered he was electrocuted and told there were five lights.The point the Cardassian was trying to make is he broke Picard. In the end Picard showed his torturer that he didn't win, and told him how many lights there were.
  • No, I am not dead. Because I refuse to believe the afterlife is run by you. The universe is not so badly designed!
  • There is a way out of every box, a solution to every puzzle; it's just a matter of finding it.
  • Now, this will put the ship at risk. Quite frankly, we may not survive. But I want you to believe that I am doing this for a greater purpose, and that what is at stake here is more than any of you can possibly imagine. I know you have your doubts about me, about each other, about this ship.All I can say is that although we have only been together for a short time, I know that you are the finest crew in the fleet. And I would trust each of you with my life. So, I am asking you for a leap of faith — and to trust me.

Quotes about Picard[edit]

Alphabetized by author
  • Captain Picard, is the exact opposite of a Hollywood action-hero.
    • Dirk Baecker, in Inclusion/ Exclusiom (2002), p. 76
  • Picard stands as the bearer of Starfleet's conscience and an exemplar of moral autonomy.
    • Kevin Decker and Jason Eberl Star Trek and Philosophy: The Wrath of Kant (2008), p. 141
  • Captain Picard is perceived to be a gentler soul than Captain Kirk.
    • Marc Dipaol, in War, Politics and Superheroes : Ethics and Propaganda in Comics and Film (2011), p. 30
  • The new captain of the Enterprise, Jean-Luc Picard, is the wise man. He rules the Enterprise with a sagely wisdom.
    • Pallab Ghosh, in "Klingons on the Starship Bow" in New Scientist Vo. 117, issue 1605 (24 March 1988), p. 63
  • As shown in his speech and actions, Picard is a man of intelligence, courage, integrity, compassion, courtesy.
    • Mark Jancovich and James Lyons, in Quality Popular Television : Cult TV, The Industry and Fans (2003), p. 111
  • Patrick Stewart's identification with Jean-Luc Picard is a prime exemplar of the extreme entanglement between actor and character produced by cult television programs, yet in Stewart's case this entanglement has not precluded a very active and successful post-Star Trek career.
    • Sara Gwenllian-Jones and Roberta E. Pearson, in Cult Television (2004), p. 65
  • Those ... who are familiar with the character Captain Picard, already know him to be the leader that we all wish we worked for, whose leadership gives us confidence and comfort in meeting the challenges we face each and every day, and the type of leader that we should strive to become.
    • Wess Roberts and Bill Ross in Make It So : Leadership Lessons from Star Trek, The Next Generation (1995), p. xi
  • The bridge of the Enterprise, under the moderate and controlled command of Captain Picard, is a locus of "enlightened understanding."
    • Rosemarie Garland Thomson, Freakery: cultural spectacles of the extraordinary body (1996), p. 334
  • The new captain, Jean-Luc Picard, was French and enjoyed reading, classical music, William Shakespeare, archaeology, and theatre.
    • Gary Westfahl, in The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy : Themes, Works, and Wonders (2005) Vol. 3, p. 1264
  • Captain Picard is not the swashbuckler that Captain Kirk was.

External links[edit]

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