Sheep

From Wikiquote
(Redirected from Lamb)
Jump to: navigation, search
I send you forth as sheep in the midst of wolves: be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves. ~ Jesus

Sheep (Ovis aries) are quadrupedal, ruminant mammals typically kept as livestock. Like all ruminants, sheep are members of the order Artiodactyla, the even-toed ungulates. Although the name "sheep" applies to many species, in everyday usage it almost always refers to Ovis aries. Numbering a little over 1 billion, domestic sheep are the most numerous species in their genus. A lamb is a young sheep. Sheep and lambs are often used as symbols of peacefulness or meekness.

Qoutes[edit]

It is useless for the sheep to pass resolutions in favour of vegetarianism while the wolf remains of a different opinion. ~ William Ralph Inge
  • Mary had a little lamb
    Its fleece was white as snow,
    And everywhere that Mary went
    The lamb was sure to go.
    • Mrs. Sarah J. Hale, Mary's Little Lamb, first published in her Poems for our Children (1830). Claimed for John Roulston by Mary Sawyer Tyler. Disproved by Mrs. Hale's son, in a Letter to the Boston Transcript, April 10, 1889. Mrs. Hale definitely asserted her claim to authorship before her death.
  • A black sheep is a biting beast.
    • Bastard's Chrestoleros (1598), p. 90, reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 740.
  • What man shall there be among you, that shall have one sheep, and if it fall into a pit on the sabbath day, will he not lay hold on it, and lift it out? How much then is a man better than a sheep? Wherefore it is lawful to do well on the sabbath days.
  • If a man have an hundred sheep, and one of them be gone astray, doth he not leave the ninety and nine, and goeth into the mountains, and seeketh that which is gone astray? And if so be that he find it, verily I say unto you, he rejoiceth more of that sheep, than of the ninety and nine which went not astray.
  • And before him shall be gathered all nations: and he shall separate them one from another, as a shepherd divideth his sheep from the goats: And he shall set the sheep on his right hand, but the goats on the left.
  • She walks — the lady of my delight —
    A sheperdess of sheep.
    Her flocks are thoughts. She keeps them white;
    She guards them from the steep.
    She feeds them on the fragrant height,
    And folds them in for sleep.
    • Alice Meynell, The Lady of the Lambs, reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 740.
  • Sheep run to the slaughterhouse, silent and hopeless, but at least sheep never vote for the butcher who kills them or the people who devour them. More beastly than any beast, more sheepish than any sheep, the voter names his own executioner and chooses his own devourer, and for this precious "right" a revolution was fought.
  • [It] is better to live one single day as a lion than a hundred years as a sheep
    E' meglio vivere un giorno da leone che cent'anni da pecora

Proverbs[edit]

  • An army of sheep led by a lion is better than an army of lions led by a sheep.
    • Attributed to Alexander the Great, as quoted in The British Battle Fleet: Its Inception and Growth Throughout the Centuries to the Present Day (1915) by Frederick Thomas Jane, but many variants of similar statements exist which have been attributed to others, though in research done for Wikiquote definite citations of original documents have not yet been found for any of them:
    • An army of sheep led by a lion are more to be feared than an army of lions led by a sheep.
      • Attributed to Chabrias, in The Older We Get, The Better We Were, Marine Corps Sea Stories (2004) by Vince Crawley, p. 67
    • It is better to have sheep led by a lion than lions led by a sheep.
      • Attributed to Polybius in Between Spenser and Swift: English Writing in Seventeenth Century Ireland (2005) by Deana Rankin, p. 124, citing A Contemporary History of Affairs in Ireland, from 1641 to 1652 (1880) by John Thomas Gilbert Vol. I, i, p. 153 - 157; but conceivably this might be reference to Polybius the historian quoting either Alexander or Chabrias.
    • An army composed of sheep but led by a lion is more powerful than an army of lions led by a sheep.
      • "Proverb" quoted by Agostino Nifo in De Regnandi Peritia (1523) as cited in Machiavelli - The First Century: Studies in Enthusiasm, Hostility, and Irrelevance (2005) by Mathew Thomson, p. 55
    • Greater is an army of sheep led by a lion, than an army of lions led by a sheep.
    • I am more afraid of one hundred sheep led by a lion than one hundred lions led by a sheep.
      • Attributed to Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord (1754 – 1838) Variants: I am more afraid of an army of 100 sheep led by a lion than an army of 100 lions led by a sheep.
        I am not afraid of an army of one hundred lions led by a sheep. I am afraid of army of 100 sheeps led by a lion.
    • Variants quoted as an anonymous proverb:
      Better a herd of sheep led by a lion than a herd of lions led by a sheep.
      A flock of sheep led by a lion was more powerful than a flock of lions led by a sheep.
      An army of sheep led by a lion would defeat an army of lions led by a sheep.
      It were better to have an army of sheep led by a lion than an army of lions led by a sheep.
      An army of sheep led by a lion, will defeat an army of lions led by a sheep.
      An army of sheep led by a lion would be superior to an army of lions led by a sheep.
      Unsourced attribution to Alexander: I would not fear a pack of lions led by a sheep, but I would always fear a flock of sheep led by a lion.
    • Other variants substitute "stag" for "sheep".

External links[edit]

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:
Wiktionary-logo-en.svg
Look up sheep in Wiktionary, the free dictionary