Latin proverbs

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This is a list of Latin proverbs and sayings.

A B C D E F G H I or J L M N O P Q R S T U VSee alsoReferences

A[edit]

  • A diabolo, qui est simia dei.
    • English equivalent: Where god has a church the devil will have his chapel.
    • "Very seldom does any good thing arise but there comes an ugly phantom of a caricature of it."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalentː Proverbs of All Nations. W. Kent & Company (late D. Bogue). 1859. p. 130. 
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 874. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Abbati, medico, patrono que intima pande.
    • English equivalent: Conceal not the truth from thy physician and lawyer.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 666. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Absens haeres non erit.
    • English equivalent: Out of sight, out of mind.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 16. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Abyssus abyssum invocat.
    • English equivalent: Deep calls to deep.
    • "The more of the context of a problem that a scientist can comprehend, the greater are his chances of finding a truly adequate solution."
    • Russell L. Ackoff, The development of operations research as a science (1956)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 695. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Acquirit qui tuetur.
    • English equivalent: Sparing is the first gaining.
    • Burke (2009). The General Armory of England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales, Comprising a Registry of Armorial Bearings from the Earliest to the Present Time. Heritage Books. p. 710. ISBN 0788437208. 
  • Acta Non Verba.
    • Translations: Deeds, not words - motto of the United States Merchant Marine Academy, at Kings Point, New York, USA.
    • Closest English equivalents: Action, not words; A man of words and not of deeds, is like a garden full of weeds; Words are leaves, deeds are fruits.
    • Fuschetto (2003). Kings Point: Acta Non Verba. Diversified Graphics, Incorporated. 
  • Ancipiti plus ferit ense gula.
    • Engilsh equivalent: Gluttony kills more than the sword.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 864. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Aegroto dum anima est, spes est.
    • English equivalent: As long as there is life there is hope.
    • Erasmus, Mynors (1991). Collected Works of Erasmus: Adages II I 1 to II VI 100. University of Toronto Press. p. 467. ISBN 0802059546. 
  • Aeque pars ligni curvi ac recti valet igni.
    • English equivalent: Crooked logs make straight fires.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 683. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Age quod agis.
    • Translation and English equivalent: Do what you do, in the sense of "Do well what you do", "Do well in whatever you do" or "Be serious in what you do"
    • The Nation. Nation Company. 1884. p. 425. 
  • Age si quid agis.
    • Translation: "If there is something [quid for aliquid] you do (well), carry on", "If you do something, do it well" see also "Age quod agis"
    • English equivalent: Bloom where you are planted.
    • Lindsay (1968). Early Latin verse. Oxford U. P.. p. 21. 
  • Aliis si licet, tibi non licet.
    • Translation: If others are allowed to, that does not mean you are. (see also quod licet Iovi, non licet bovi)
    • Patrick (1810). Terence's Comedies. Gilbert and Hodges. p. 345. 
  • An nescis, mi fili, quantilla prudentia mundus regatur? (alternatively: regatur orbis)
  • Aliquis in omnibus est nullus in singulis.
    • Translation: Someone in all, is nothing in one.
    • English equivalent: Jack of all trades, master of none; Jack of all trades begs bread on Sundays.
    • "Somebody who has a very wide range of abilities or skills usually does not excel at any of them."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 156. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 70. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Arcem ex cloacâ facĕre.
    • English equivalent: Don't make a mountain out of a molehill.
    • Proverbs of All Nations. W. Kent & Company (late D. Bogue). 1859. p. 58. 
  • Atqui, e lotio est.
    • Translation: Yet it comes from urine.
    • Emperor Vespasian to his son Titus, when the latter, complaining about the former's urine tax, acknowledged a coin collected had no odor.

  • Auctoritas non veritas facit legem
  • Audi, vide, tace, si tu vis vivere (in pace).
    • Translation: Hear, see, be silent, if you wish to live (in peace). Roman proverb, according to this.
    • English equivalent: Rather see than hear.
  • Aut viam inveniam aut faciam.
    • Translation: I'll either find a way or make one.
    • English equivalent: Where there's a will, there's a way.
    • "If you are sufficiently determined to achieve something, then you will find a way of doing so."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 299. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Stone, J. R. (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings, Routledge. p. 351

B[edit]

  • Basio saepe volam, cui plagam diligo solam.
    • English equivalent: Many kiss the hand they wish cut off.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1084. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Bellum se ipsum alet.
    • War will feed on itself.
    • Roberts (2003). The Age of Liberty: Sweden 1719-1772. Cambridge University Press. p. 19. 
  • Bene diagnoscitur, bene curatur.
    • English equivalent: A disease known is half cured.
    • Meyer, Ndura-Ouédraogo (2009). Seeds of new hope: pan-African peace studies for the 21st century. Africa World Press. p. 331. ISBN 1592216625. 
  • Brevis oratio penetrat coelos; Longa potatio evacuat scyphos.

C[edit]

  • Carpe diem.
    • Translation: "Seize the day." By Horace, Odes I,11,8, to Leuconoe: carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero ("take hold of the day, believing as little as possible in the next"). The verb "carpere" has the literal meaning "to pick, pluck," particularly in reference to the picking of fruits and flowers, and was used figuratively by the Roman poets to mean "to enjoy, use, make use of."
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 765. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Carthago delenda est.
    • Translation: "Carthage must be destroyed." Actually, ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam ("Apart from that, I conclude that Carthage must be destroyed") Cato the Elder used to end every speech of his to the Senate, on any subject whatsoever, with this phrase. Mentioned to indicate that someone habitually harps on one subject.
  • Cave ab homine unius libri.
    • English equivalent: Fear the man of one book.
    • "Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so."
    • Douglas Adams, Last Chance to See (1990)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 851. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Cedens in uno cedet in pluribus.
    • English equivalents: In for a penny, in for a pound; Virtue which parleys is near a surrender.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 957. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Citius venit malum quam revertitur.
    • English equivalent: Misfortune comes on horseback and goes away on foot.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 65. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Cito maturum cito putridum.
    • English equivalent: Early ripe, early rotten.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 758. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Cogitationes posteriores sunt saniores.
    • English equivalent: Second thoughts are best.
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 747. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Consilio, quod respuitur, nullum subest auxilium.
    • English equivalent: He that will not be counseled cannot be helped.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 964. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Consuetudinis magna vis est
    • English equivalent: Old habits die hard.
    • Cicero, Tusculanae Quaestiones, II.37
  • Consuetudo altera natura est
    • English equivalent: Old habits die hard.
    • Breen (2010). Imagining an English Reading Public, 1150-1400. Cambridge University Press. p. 46. ISBN 0521199220. 
  • Contritium praecedit superbia.
    • English equivalent: Pride comes before fall.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1148. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Cor boni concilii statue tecum non est enim tibi aliud pluris illo.
    • English equivalent: Though thou hast ever so many counsellors, yet do not forsake the counsel of thy own soul.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1044. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Corruptissima re publica plurimae leges
    • Translation: The greater the degeneration of the republic, the more of its laws.
    • (Tacitus) Annals (117)
  • "Credula est spes improba.
    • English equivalent: He that lives on hope will die fasting.
    • "Do not pin all your hopes on something you may not attain, because you could end up with nothing."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent:Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 120. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 952. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Cui caput dolet, omnia membra languent.
    • English equivalent: When the head is sick, the whole body is sick.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1117. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Cuilibet fatuo placet sua calva.
    • English equivalentː Every fool is pleased with his own folly.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "147". Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 139. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. 
  • Cuiusvis hominis est errare, nullius nisi insipientis in errore perseverare. —
    • Any man can make a mistake; only a fool keeps making the same one.
    • English equivalent: He wrongfully blames the sea who suffers shipwreck twice.
    • Marcus Tullius Cicero, Philippica XII, ii, 5
  • Curae canitiem inducunt.
    • English equivalent: Fretting cares make grey hairs.
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 631. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Custode et cura natura potentior omni.
    • English equivalent: Nature is beyond all teaching.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 764. ISBN 0415096243. 

D[edit]

  • Deus quem punire vult dementat.
    • English equivalent: Whom God will destroy, he first make mad.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 841. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Diem vesper commendat.
    • Translation: Celebrate the day when it is evening.
    • Meaning: Don't celebrate untill you are 100 % sure there is a reason to do so.; Don't count your chickens before they're hatched.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 200. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Difficile est longum subito deponere amorem.
    • English equivalent: True love never grows old.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1107. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Dii facientes adiuvant.
    • Translation: Gods help those who do.
    • English equivalent: God helps them that help themselves.
    • Meaning: "When in trouble first of all every one himself should do his best to improve his condition."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 150. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Cantera Ortiz de Urbina, Jesús (16 November 2005). "975". Refranero latino. Ediciones Akal. p. 83. ISBN 978-84-460-1296-2. 
  • Dives aut iniquus est, aut iniqui heres.
    • English equivalent: No one gets rich quickly if he is honest.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 963. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Dives est qui sibi nihil deesse putat.
    • Translation: The rich man is the one who thinks to himself that nothing was lacking.
    • Note: Another way to phrase this is by this quote:
      • No one – not a single person out of a thousand [elderly interviewed because of their wisdom expertise] – said that to be happy you should try and work as hard as you can to make money to buy the things you want.
      • No one – not a single person –– said it's important to be at least as wealthy as the people around you, and if you have more than they do it's real success.
      • No one – not a single person –– said you should choose your work based on your desired future earning power.”
    • From: Brody, Jane (2011). 30 Lessons for Living. Penguin Group. p. 57. ISBN 1594630844. 
    • English equivalent: Wealth rarely brings happiness.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 670. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Divide et impera.
    • Translation: Divide and govern [or conquer]. Attributed to Julius Caesar.
    • English equivalent: Divide and conquer.
    • Meaning: "The best way to conquer or control a group of people is by encouraging them to fight among themselves rather than allowing them to unite in opposition to the ruling authority."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 57. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 13 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "823". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. 
  • Docendo discimus.
    • Translation: We learn by teaching. (Seneca)
    • Vahros (1986). Docendo discimus. University Press. 
  • Duabus ancoris fultus.
    • English equivalent: Good riding at two anchors, men have told, for if the one fails, the other may hold.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Ductus Exemplo
    • Translation: Lead by Example.
    • Gray (2009). Embedded: a Marine Corps adviser inside the Iraqi army. Naval Institute Press. p. 74. ISBN 1591143403. 
  • Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori.
    • Translation: It is sweet and honorable to die for the fatherland. By Horace, Odes III, 2, 13, frequently quoted on war memorials, and notably in the poem Dulce Et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen, who calls it "the old lie".
  • Dulce pomum quum abest custos.
    • Translation: Sweet is the apple when the keeper is away.
    • English equivalent: Forbidden fruit is sweetest.
    • Meaning: "Things that you must not have or do are always the most desirable."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 93. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • János Erdélyi (1851). Magyar közmondások könlyve. Nyomatott Kozma Vazulnál. p. 169. 
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 93. 
  • Dulcior illa sapit caro, quae magis ossibus haeret.
    • English equivalent: The sweetest flesh is near the bones.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "1666". Dictionary of European proverbs. II. Routledge. p. 1176. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Dum canem caedimus, corrosisse dicitur corrium.
    • Translation: If you want to beat a dog you will easily find a stick.
    • Meaning: Someone who wants to be mean will find things to be mean about no matter what.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 104. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Dum satur est venter, gaudet caput inde libenter.
    • Translation: When the belly is full, the head is pleased.
    • English equivalent: Full stomach, contented heart.
    • Cantera Ortiz de Urbina, Jesús (16 November 2005). "768". Refranero latino. Ediciones Akal. p. 68. ISBN 978-84-460-1296-2. 
  • Dum spiro, spero.
    • Translation: "As long as I breathe, I hope." Translated as "While I breathe, I hope" the motto of the State of South Carolina [[1]]
    • Gunter (2000). Dum Spiro, Spero: While I Breathe, I Hope. In His Steps Publishing. pp. 180. ISBN 1585350192. 
    • English equivalent: As long as there is life there is hope.
  • Dum vivimus, vivamus!
    • Translation: While we live, let us live!
    • Organization) (1972). Dum Vivimus, Vivamus: A Chronicle of the First Century of the Knights of Momus, 1872-1972. 
  • Dum vita est, spes est.
    • Translation: While there is life, there is hope.
    • Bretzke (1998). Consecrated Phrases: A Latin Theological Dictionary : Latin Expressions Commonly Found in Theological Writings. Liturgical Press. p. 41. ISBN 1. 

E[edit]

  • Ecce omnis, qui dicit vulgo proverbium, in te assumet illud dicens: Sicut mater, ita et filia ejus.
    • Translation: Such mother, such daughter.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • Meaning: "Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Effectus sequitir causam.
    • Translation: Effect follows a reason.
    • English equivalent: Every why has a wherefore.
    • Meaning: "Everything has an underlying reason."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 80. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 22 September 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 765. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Eodem cubito, eadem trutina, pari libra.
    • Translation: The elbow, the same balance, an equal balance.
    • English equivalent: Whatever measure you deal out to others will be dealt back to you.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1219. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Et ipsa scientia potestas est.
    • Translation: "And knowledge itself, is power" (Francis Bacon, Meditationes sacrae)
    • Djité (2008). The Sociolinguistics of Development in Africa. Multilingual Matters. p. 53. ISBN 1847690459. 
  • Ex malis moribus bonae leges natae sunt.
    • Translation: Bad customs have given birth to good laws.
    • English equivalent: Good laws have sprung from bad customs.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Excusatio non petita, accusatio manifesta.
    • English equivalent: A guilty conscience needs no accuser.
    • Meaning: "People who know they have done wrong reveal their guilt by the things they say or the way they interpret what other people say."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 112. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "243". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 227. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. 
  • Extremis malis extrema remedia.
    • Translation: Extreme remedies for extreme ills.
    • English equivalent: Desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.
    • Meaning: "Drastic action is called for – and justified – when you find yourself in a particularly difficult situation."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 53. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 10 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 688. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Expecta bos olim herba.
    • Translation: Waiting for the grass the cow dies.
    • English equivalent: While the grass grows the steed starves.
    • Meaning: Dreams or expectations may be realized too late.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1228. ISBN 0415096243. 

F[edit]

  • Factis ut credam facis.
    • English equivalent: No need of words, trust deeds.
    • Meaning: "Actions may be, and indeed sometimes are deceptive in a measure though not as much so as words; and accordingly are received in general as more full and satisfactory proofs of the real disposition and character of persons than verbal expressions."
    • Source for meaning:Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 10. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 91. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Festina lente!
    • "Make haste slowly" (i.e. proceed quickly but with caution, a motto of Augustus Caesar).
    • Rochester Institute of Technology (1980). Festina lente. 
    • English equivalent: More speed less haste.
  • Fides facit fidem.
    • English equivalent: Confidence begets confidence.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 187. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Fidite Nemini
    • Translation: Trust nobody/no one.
    • "Every time you trust someone you end up getting screwed."
    • Cinderella, The More Things Change (1991)
    • Conciones Adventuales: De De Captivitate Petri, Figurante Captivitatem Peccatoris. Verdussen. 1737. p. 113. 
  • Finis originae pende.
    • English equivalent: Such a beginning, such an end.
    • Meaning: The outcome of things depends on how they start.
  • Fortes fortuna iuvat
    • Translation: Fortune favors the brave. (cf. Audaces fortuna iuvat.) (Terence)
    • Marchesi (2008). The Art of Pliny's Letters: A Poetics of Allusion in the Private Correspondence. Cambridge University Press. p. 176. ISBN 0521882273. 
  • Fronti nulla fides.
    • English equivalent: Appearances deceive.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 124. ISBN 0415160502. 

G[edit]

  • Generosus equus non curat canem latrantem.
    • English equivalent: The dogs bark but the caravan passes on.
    • "Everyone's got opinions, but nobody's got the answers" so let the world say what it will.
    • Cinderella, Somebody Save Me (1987)
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 340. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Gloriosum est iniurias oblivisci.
    • English equivalent: Forgive and forget.
    • Rauschen, Geyer, Albers, Zellinger (1933). Florilegium patristicum. P. Hanstein. p. 58. 
  • Gutta cavat lapidem
    • A drop hollows out the stone. (Ovid, Epistles)
  • Gutta cavat lapidem non bis, sed saepe cadendo; sic homo fit sapiens non bis, sed saepe legendo.
    • A drop hollows out the stone by falling not twice, but many times; so too is a person made wise by reading not two, but many books.
    • (Giordano Bruno, Il Candelaio)
  • Gutta cavat lapidem non vi, sed saepe cadendo
    • A drop hollows out the stone not by force, but falling many times. (original latin proverb).

H[edit]

  • Historia est vitae magistra.
    • Translation: "History is the tutor of life.”
    • Dover, R. and M. S. Goodman Learning from the Secret Past: Cases in British Intelligence History, Georgetown University Press.
  • Hodie mihi, cras tibi.
    • Translation: "What's to me today, tomorrow to you.”
    • English equivalent: The door swings both ways; What goes around comes around.
    • Ferler, J. (1723). Hodie Mihi, Cras Tibi, Gruber.
  • Homines quod volunt credunt.
    • Translation: "Men believe what they want to." (Julius Caesar)
    • Lautenbach, E. (2002). Latein-Deutsch: Zitaten-Lexikon: Quellennachweise, Lit.
  • Homo cogitat, Deus iudicat.
    • Translation: Man proposes but God disposes.
    • Meaning: Things often don't turn out as you have planned.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 103. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Honor sequitir fugientem.
    • Translation: Honor follows the fleeing.
    • English equivalent: Follow glory and it will flee, flee glory and it will follow thee.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 832. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Hostium munera, non munera.
    • Translation: Gifts of enemies are no gifts.
    • Note: "This advice has its root in the story of the Trojan Horse, the treacherous subterfuge by which the Greeks finally overcame their trojan adversaries at the end of the Trojan War."
    • English equivalent: Beware of Greeks bearing gifts.
    • Meaning: "Do not trust gifts or favors if they come from an enemy."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser; David H. Pickering (2003). The Facts On File Dictionary of Classical and Biblical Allusions. Infobase Publishing. p. 46. ISBN 978-0-8160-4868-7. Retrieved on 1 July 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 855. ISBN 0415096243. 

I[edit]

Note: I and J are the same letter in Latin.

  • Ignavum fortuna repugnat.
    • Translation: Fortune disdains the lazy.
    • Meaning: Laziness deceives wisdom.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 601. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Ignorantia legis non excusat
    • Translation: Ignorance of the law is no excuse.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 287. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Imperare sibi maximum imperium est.
    • Translation: To rule yourself is the ultimate power. (Seneca)
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 915. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Improbe Neptunum accusat, qui iterum naufragiam facit.
    • English equivalent: He complains wrongfully at the sea that suffer shipwreck twice.
    • Meaning: Don't do the same thing again and expect different results.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 898. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • In dubio, abstine.
    • Translation: When in doubt, abstain.
    • English equivalent: When in doubt, leave it out.
    • Meaning: "If you are unsure what to do, it is best to do nothing at all."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 296. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1223. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • In dubio pro reo.
    • Translation: "When in doubt, in favour of the accused". (Corpus Juris Civilis)
    • Stree, W. (1962). In dubio pro reo, Mohr.
  • In iudicando criminosa est celeritas.
    • Translation: Hasty judgments are criminal.
    • English equivalent: Hasty judgment leads to repentance.
    • Meaning: A quick evaluation is a terrible evaluation.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 196. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • In necessariis unitas, in dubiis libertas, in omnibus caritas
    • Translation: "In necessary things unity, in doubtful things liberty, in all things charity" (often misattributed to St Augustine).
    • Bretzke, J. T. (1998). Consecrated Phrases: A Latin Theological Dictionary : Latin Expressions Commonly Found in Theological Writings, Liturgical Press.
  • In nullum avarus bonus est, in se pessimus.
    • English equivalent: The covetous man is good to none and worst to himself.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 83. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • In propria causa nemo debet esse iudex.
    • Translation: No one should be the judge in his own trial.
    • English equivalent: No one can be the judge in his own case.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1038. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • In risu agnoscitur fatuus.
    • English equivalent: A fool is ever laughing.
    • Emanuel Strauss (1994). "137". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 102. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. 
  • In vino veritas.
    • Translation: There is truth in vine.
    • English equivalent: In wine there is truth.
    • Meaning: Alcohol consumed removes the inhibition against telling the truth that occasionally one would like to keep secret.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 272. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Inimicum quamvis humilem docti est metuere.
    • Idiomatic and literal translation: There is no little enemy.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 718. ISBN 0415096243. 
    • Literal translation: The wise man must fear a humble enemy.
  • Innumeras curas secum adferunt liberi.
    • Translation: Children bring with them countless cares.
    • English equivalent: Children are uncertain comforts but certain cares.
    • Meaning: "Children are bound to cause their parents anxiety, and may or may not also bring them joy."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 40. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 2 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 654. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Intemperans adulescentia effetum corpus tradit senectuti.
    • English equivalent: They who would be young when they are old must be old when they are young.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "1605". Dictionary of European proverbs. II. Routledge. p. 1151. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Inter gladium et iugulum.
    • English equivalent: Don't go between the tree and the bark.
    • Meaning: Do not interfere when two parts are having an argument.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 729. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Interdum stultus bene loquitur.'
    • English equivalent: ”A fool may give a wise man counsel.”
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 40. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Ira furor brevis est.
    • Translation: "Anger is brief insanity" (Horace, epistles I, 2, 62).
    • Meaning: If you are mad, count to twenty.
    • Stone, J. R. (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings, Routledge.
  • Iter per praecepta longum, per exempla, breve et efficax.
  • Iucundum est narrare sua mala.
    • English equivalent: A problem shared is a problem halved.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 351. ISBN 0415096243. 

K[edit]

The letter "k" was not commonly used in Classical Latin.

L[edit]

  • "Latet enim veritas, sed nihil pretiosius veritate" Francisco Sanchez de las Brozas (Minerva I, 1, 40, 16).
    • Translation: "Truth is hidden, but nothing is more beautiful than the truth”
    • de las Brozas, F. S. (1754). Minerva, sive de causis latinae linguae commentarius.
  • Lumen soli mutuum das.
    • Translation: You are lending light to the sun.
    • Note: Said of persons who affect to explain what is perfectly clear and intelligible.
    • Source of proverb & meaning: H. T. Riley Dictionary of Latin Quotations, Proverbs, Maxims, and Mottos, &c. (1866), p. 210.

M[edit]

  • Macte animo! Generose puer sic itur ad astra!
    • Translation: "Be strong, young man! Through this way one gets to the stars." (Motto of the Brazilian Air Force Academy)
    • Chateaubriand, F. R. and A. T. de Mattos (1902). The memoirs of François René, vicomte de Chateaubriand, sometime ambassador to England: being a translation by Alexander Teixeira de Mattos of the Mémoires d'outre-tombe, with illustrations from contemporary sources, Freemantle and co.
  • Mala herba cito crescit
    • Translation: "Weeds grow fast.”
    • Bezemer, K. (2005). Pierre de Belleperche: Portrait of a Legal Puritan, Klostermann.
  • Mala hostibus eveniant.
    • English equivalent: Shame take him that shame thinketh.
    • Meaning: Don't think evil of others since they most likely act the way they do because of situational factors: Never attribute something to malice which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. entry 806. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Malum consilium quod mutari non potest.
    • Translation: "It is a bad plan that cannot be changed (A plan that cannot be changed is a bad one).”
    • Stone, J. R. (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings, Routledge
  • Malo nodo malus quaerendus cuneus.
    • Translation: For a tough knot take a blunt wedge.
    • English equivalent: Desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.
    • Meaning: "Drastic action is called for – and justified – when you find yourself in a particularly difficult situation."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 53. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 10 August 2013. 
    • Emanuel Strauss (1994). "812". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 552. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. Retrieved on 10 August 2013. 
  • Malum quidem nullum esse sine aliquo bono.
    • Translation: "There is, to be sure, no evil without something good.”
    • Watasin, E. The Dark Victorian: Risen, A-Girl Studio.
    • English equivalent: Every cloud has its silver lining.
  • Manus manum lavat
    • Translation: "One hand washes the other.”
    • Houdt, T. (2002). Self-Presentation and Social Identification: The Rhetoric and Pragmatics of Letter Writing in Early Modern TImes, Leuven University Press.
  • Mater artium necessitas.
    • Translation: "Necessity is the mother of invention" (Apuleius)
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 989. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Maxima debetur puero reverentia
    • Translation: "One owes the greatest possible care for the child" (Juvenal)
    • Tegnér, E. and L. F. C. W. Böttiger (1849). Esaias Tegnérs samlade skrifter.
  • Medicus curat, natura sanat
    • Translation: "The doctor cares [for his patient], nature heals [him]." or "Doctor cures, nature saves”
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 869. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Melium est nomen bonum quam divitae multae.
    • English equivalent: A good name is the best of all treasures.
    • "If a man has good corn, or wood, or boards, or pigs to sell, or can make better chairs or knives, crucibles, or church organs, than anybody else, you will find a broad, hard-beaten road to his house, tho it be in the woods. 'tis certain that the secret can not be kept: the first witness tells it to a second, and men go by fives and tens and fifties to his door."
    • Ralph Waldo Emerson, Works, Volume VIII. In his Journal. (1855), p. 528. (Ed. 1912)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 33. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Memento mori.
    • Translation: Remember that you are going to die.
    • "Remembering that I'll be dead soon is the most important tool I've ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure — these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important."
    • Steve Jobs, Stanford University commencement address (12 June 2005)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1151. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Mendacem memorem esse oportet.
    • English equivalent: A liar should have a good memory.
    • Meaning: "Liars must remember the untruths they have told, to avoid contradicting themselves at some later date."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 167. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "274". Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 257. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. Retrieved on 24 November 2013. 
  • Mens regnum bona possidet.
    • English equivalent: His own desire leads every man.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 977. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Misera fortuna, qui caret inimico.
    • Translation: It is a wreteched fate which is absent enemies.
    • English equivalent: If you have no enemies it is a sign that fortune has forgotten you; People throw stones only at trees with fruit on them.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1008. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Mobiles ad superstitionem perculsae semel mentes
    • Translation: "Minds once cowed are prone to superstition."
    • Tacitus, "Agricola", 1.28
  • Mulier est hominis confusio.
    • Translation: "Woman is man's ruin."
    • "Part of a comic definition of woman" from the Altercatio Hadriani Augusti et Secundi.[2] Famously quoted by Chauntecleer in Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales’’.
  • Multum clamoris, parum lanae.
    • Translation and English equivalent: Great cry and little wool.
    • Meaning: "Much ado about nothing."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Keating, Walter (1859). Proverbs of All Nations. W. Kent & Company (late D. Bogue). p. 128. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "178". Dictionary of European Proverbs. II. Routledge. p. 173. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. 
  • Mundus vult decipi, ergo decipiatur.
    • Translation: The world desires to be deceived; therefore it is. (Attributed to Petronius)
    • English equivalent: The world wants to be taken in.
    • Thompson, J., C. The University of Arizona. Rhetoric, et al. (2008). "A Kind of Thing that Might Be": Toward a Poetics of New Media, University of Arizona.

N[edit]

  • Ne puero gladium.
    • Translation: "Do not give a child a sword."
    • Meaning: Let every person act in his proper sphere of life.
    • H. T. Riley Dictionary of Latin Quotations, Proverbs, Maxims, and Mottos, &c. (1866), p. 249.
  • Ne quid expectes amicos, quod tute agere possis.
    • Translation: Expect nothing from friends, do what you can do yourself.
    • English equivalent: For what thou canst do thyself, rely not on another.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 600. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Ne quid nimis
    • Translation: "Nothing too much", moderation in all thing (Terence)
    • Kierkegaard, S. (2008). Sickness Unto Death, Wilder Publications.
    • Swedish equivalent: There must be some moderation.
  • Nemo regere potest nisi qui et regi.
    • English equivalent: Who has not served cannot command.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 758. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Nemo iudex in causa sua.
    • Translation: "No one is a judge in his own case".
    • Boczek, B. A. (2005). International Law: A Dictionary, Scarecrow Press.
  • Nescis quid serus vesper vehat.
    • Translation: "You know not what night-fall may bring."
    • H. T. Riley Dictionary of Latin Quotations, Proverbs, Maxims, and Mottos, &c. (1866), p. 261.
  • In nocte consilium.
    • The night brings counsel.
    • English equivalent: Take counsel of one's pillow.
    • Note: Specified as a Latin proverb in the source.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 63. 
  • ‘’Non alios sno modulo metiri.’’
    • English equivalent: Do not judge others by your own yardstick.
    • "l often went fishing up in Maine during the summer. Personally I am very fond of strawberries and cream, but I have found that for some strange reason fish prefer worms."
    • Dale Carnegie, How to win friends and influence people (1933)
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 22. 
  • Non capiunt lepores tympana rauca leves.
    • English equivalent: Drumming is not the way to catch a hare.
    • Meaning: Don't expect anyone to change his ways by scolding him.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 754. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Nocere facile est, prodesse difficile.
    • English equivalent: Do not think that one enemy is insignificant, or that a thousand friends are too many.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 718. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Non nobis solum nati sumus
    • Translation: "We are not born for ourselves alone”
    • Meaning: Each one of us carries a responsibility for the whole world.
    • Stone, J. R. (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings, Routledge.
  • Non olet
    • Translation: "It [money] doesn't smell" (according to Suetonius, Emperor Vespasian was challenged by his son Titus for taxing the public lavatories, the emperor held up a coin before his son and asked whether it smelled)
    • Ferlosio, R. S. (2005). Non olet, Destino.
  • Non opus est follo suspendere tympana collo.
    • Translation: A fool does not need any bells.
    • English equivalent: A tongue of a fool carves a piece of his heart to all that sit near him.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 136. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Non quia difficilia sunt non audemus, sed quia non audemus, difficilia sunt.
    • Translation: "It is not because things are difficult that we do not dare, but because we do not dare, things are difficult." (Seneca, Letter to Lucilius, letter 104, section 26, line 5)
    • Gresley, W. (1835). Ecclesiastes Anglicanus: being a treatise on preaching, as adapted to a Church of England congregation : in a series of letters to a young clergyman, printed for J. G. F. & J. Rivington.
  • Non scholae, sed vitae discimus.
    • Translation: "We learn not for school but for life." (Seneca's original quotation is "Non vitae, sed scholae discimus.”)
    • Stone, J. R. (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings, Routledge.
  • Non semper erit aestas.
    • Translation: "It will not always be summer." (be prepared for hard times)
    • Stone, J. R. (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings, Routledge.
  • Nulla poena sine lege
    • Translation: "No punishment without a law.”
    • Nulla Poena Sine Lege. E.j. Brill, Leiden 1934, Brill Archive.
  • Nulla regula sine exceptione.
    • Translation: "No rule without exception.”
    • (1869). Hygiea.
  • Nulli tacuisse nocet, tutum silentii premium.
    • English equivalent: Least said, soonest mended.
    • Meaning: "In private animosities and verbal contentions, where angry passions are apt to rise, and irritating, if not profane expressions are often made use of, as we sometimes see to be the case, not only among neighbors, but in families, between husbands and wives, or parents and children, or the children themselves and other members of the household, - the least said, the better in general. By multiplying words, cases often grow worse instead of better."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. pp. 125. 
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 53. 
  • Nullus est liber tam mallus, ut non aliqua parte prosit.
    • English equivalent: No book was so bad, but some good might be got out of it.
    • Meaning: You might typically get something good out of an overall faulty book, especially a non fictional one, such as sound advice or anecdotes to tell others.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1104. ISBN 0415096243. 

O[edit]

  • Oblata arripe.
    • Translation: Seize the offer.
    • English equivalent: When the pig is proffered, hold up the poke.
    • Meaning: We should accept the offers that has been given us.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1226. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Obscuris vera involvens
    • Translation: Obscurity envelops truth. (Virgil).
    • English equivalent: Truth gives a short answer, lies go round about.
    • Putnam, M. C. J. (1995). Virgil's Aeneid: Interpretation and Influence, University of North Carolina Press.
  • Occidit miseros crambe repetita magistros.
    • English equivalent: Take heed of enemies reconciled and of meat twice boiled.
    • Meaning: Your former enemies might cunningly take revenge on you just out of spite.; Trust not a reconciled enemy more than an open foe.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 25. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Oculus animi index.
    • Translation: Eyes are the index of the mind.
    • English equivalent: The eye looks but it is the mind that sees.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1175. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Omnia cum pretio.
    • Translation: All things (in rome) have their price. original "omnia Romae cum pretio" Juvenal
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1111. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Omnium artium medicina nobilissima est.
    • Translation: Medicine is the noblest of all arts.
    • Lautenbach, E. (2002). Latein-Deutsch: Zitaten-Lexikon: Quellennachweise, Lit.
  • Oratores fuint, poetae nascuntur.
    • English equivalent: Poets are born, but orators are trained.
    • Meaning: Some things can be improved by training, others require innate talent.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 331. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Optimi natatores saepius submerguntur.
    • English equivalent: Good swimmers are often drowned.
    • Meaning: Beware of letting your competence lead you into overconfidence.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Optimum medicamentum quies est.
    • Translation: Rest is the best medicine.
    • Arnott, J. (1845). Appendix to an essay on therapeutical inquiry, containing the application of plans of treatment noticed therein to the practice of midwifery.
  • Otia dant vitia.
    • English equivalent: Idle hands are the devils playthings.
    • Meaning: If you are bored or idle, start doing some work.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 710. ISBN 0415096243. 

P[edit]

  • Pacta sunt servanda
    • Translation: "Agreements must be honoured.”
    • Hasan, A. M. (2005). Pacta sunt servanda: the principle and its application in petroleum production sharing contract, Fikahati Aneska.
  • Pars est beneficii quod petitur si cito neges.
    • Translation: A prompt refusal has in part the grace of a favour granted.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 147. 
  • Pax melior est quam iustissimum bellum.
    • Translation: "Peace is better than the most just war.”
    • Clure, A. M. Les HazArts Légendaires, Annie Mc Clure.
  • Pede poena claudo.
    • Translation: "Punishment comes limping."
    • English equivalent: Punishment is lame, but it comes.
    • Valerius, J. D. (1855). Samlade vitterhets-arbeten, Norstedt.
  • Periculum in mora.
    • Translation: [There's] danger in delay. (Livy)
    • English equivalent: Delays are dangerous.
    • Meaning: "Hesitation or procastination may lead to trouble or disaster."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 53. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 10 August 2013. 
    • Ruder, G. (1766). Om rikets swåra öde, och huru det kan förekommas. Periculum in mora.
  • Philosophum non facit barba.
    • Translation: "A beard doesn't make a philosopher." (Plutarch)
    • Meaning: Mere formal signs of authority does not make one.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 117. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Piscem vorat maior minorem.
    • Translation: The large fishes eats the small ones.
    • Meaning: "Small organizations or insignificant people tend to be swallowed up or destroyed by those that are greater and more powerful."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 1 July 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1086. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Post prandium stabis, post coenam ambulabis.
    • Translation: "After dinner, rest a while, after supper walk a mile."
    • Source: Hugh Moore (1831). A Dictionary of Quotations. p. 314. 
  • Potius sero quam numquam
    • Translation: "Better late then never" (Livy)
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 166. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Praemonitus, praemunitus
    • Translation: "Forewarned (is) forearmed”
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 563. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Praesentem mulge, fugientem quid insequeris.
    • Translation: Milk today, for what you are aiming for is fleeing.
    • English equivalent: One today is worth two tomorrows.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1137. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Praestat cautela quam medela.
    • English equivalent: Prevention is better than cure.
    • Meaning: Precaution is infinitely better than remedial measures.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 881. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Praemonitus, praemunitus.
    • English equivalent: Forewarned, forearmed.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "401". Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 364. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. 
  • Publica fama non semper vana.
    • Translation: Provided common, commonly true.
    • English equivalent: Common fame is often to blame.
    • Meaning: A general disrepute is often true.
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 45. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 4 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 662. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Pulverulenta novis bene verritur area scopis.
    • English equivalent: "New brooms sweep clean."
    • Meaning: Newcomers are the most ambitious.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1103. ISBN 0415096243. 

Q[edit]

  • Qualis rex, talis grex
    • Translation: Like king, like people.
    • Stone, J. R. (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings, Routledge.
  • Qualis pagatio, talis laboratio.
    • Translation: What pay, such work.
    • English equivalent: You get what you pay for.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 494. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Quam bene vivas refert, non quam diu.
    • Translation: How well you live makes a difference, not how long. (Seneca)
    • Haase, W. and H. Temporini (1983). Aufstieg und Niedergang Der Römischen Welt: Geschichte und Kultur Roms Im Spiegel Der Neueren Forschung, Walter de Gruyter.
  • Quantum Satis.
    • Translation: As much as needed, enough.
    • Rundkvist, A. (1968). Quantum satis: så mycket som är tillräckligt ; aforismer, skaldeord och citat från skilda tider om livet och människan, Rundqvists Bokförlag.
  • Quem di diligunt, adulescens moritur
    • Translation: "Whom the gods love dies young" (Plautus, Bacchides, IV, 7, 18). In the comic play, a sarcastic servant says this to his aging master. The rest of the sentence reads: dum valet, sentit, sapit, "while he is full of health, perception and judgement.”
    • Morris, G. (2009). Angel Train, B&H Publishing Group.
  • Quem dii odere, paedagogum fecere (also Quem dii oderunt, paedagogum fecerunt)
    • Translation: "Whom the gods hated, they made them pedagogues”
    • Moritz, K. P. Anton Reiser: Ein Psychologischer Roman, tredition.
  • Qui dormit non peccat.
    • Translation: "He who sleeps does not sin”
    • Archer, P. and L. Archer 500 Foreign Words and Phrases You Should Know to Sound Smart: Terms to Demonstrate Your Savoir Faire, Chutzpah, and Bravado, F+W Media.
  • Qui habet aures audiendi audiat
    • Translation: "Those who have ears to hear, hear!" (Vulgate, Matthew 11:15)
    • English equivalent: Nature gave us two ears and one mouth.
    • Collins, J. F. (1985). A Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin, Catholic University of America Press.
  • Qui non est hodie, eras minus aptus erit.
    • English equivalent: He that will not when he may, when he will he may have nay.
    • Meaning: "Take advantage of an opportunity when it presents itself, even if you do not want or need it at the time, because it may no longer be available when you do."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent:Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 120. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations. W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue). p. 41. 
  • Quien me amat, amet et canum meum.
    • English equivalent: Love me, love my dog.
    • Meaning: If you love someone, you will virtually like everything about him.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 953. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Qui multum habet, plus cupit.
    • Translation: He who has much desires more. (Seneca)
    • Swedish equivalent: Much wants more.
    • Jones, P. V. and K. C. Sidwell (1986). Reading Latin: Grammar, Vocabulary and Exercises, Cambridge University Press.
  • Qui nimis capit, parum stringit.
    • English equivalent: Don't have too many irons in the fire.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 977. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Qui non proficit, deficit.
    • Translation: "He who does not go forward, loses ground." or "He who does not accomplish anything, is a failure/has shortcomings.”
    • English equivalent: He who does not advance goes backwards.
    • Stone, J. R. (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings, Routledge.
  • Qui pro innocente dicit, satis est eloquens.
    • Translation: "He who speaks for the innocent is eloquent enough." (Publilius Syrus)
    • Chambers, P. L. (2007). Latin Alive and Well: An Introductory Text, University of Oklahoma Press.
  • Qui rogat, non errat.
    • Translation: "(One) who asks, doesn't err.”
    • English equivalent: The only stupid question is the one not asked.
    • Mimbar Altar, Kanisius.
  • Qui scribit, bis legit.
    • Translation: "Who writes, reads twice.”
    • Stone, J. R. (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings, Routledge.
  • Qui tacet consentire videtur, ubi loqui debuit ac potuit.
    • Translation: "Who is silent, when he ought to and might have spoken, is seen to agree.”
    • Schlesinger, R. B., P. G. Bonassies, et al. (1968). Formation of contracts: a study of the common core of legal systems, conducted under the auspices of the General principles of law project of the Cornell Law School, Oceana Publications.
  • Qui transtulit sustinet.
    • Translation: "He who transplanted still sustains." (motto of Connecticut referring to the transplantation of settlers from England to the New World.)
    • Caughman, G., J. Devine, et al. (1997). Qui Transtulit Sustinet.
  • Qui vitulum tollit, taurum subduxerit idem .
    • English equivalent: He that steals an egg will steal an ox.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 962. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Qui vult dare parva non debet magna rogare.
    • Translation: "He who wishes to give little shouldn't ask for much.”
    • Crawford, G. A. and U. o. M. L. Workshop (1963). Elementary Latin: the basic structures, University of Michigan Press.
  • Quidquid agis, prudenter agas, et respice finem!
    • Translation: Whatever you do, may you do it prudently, and look to the end!
    • English equivalent: Whatever you do, act wisely, and consider the end.
    • Timmer, M. Van Anima tot Zeus / druk 1: encyclopedie van begrippen uit de mythologie, religie, alchemie, cultuurgeschiedenis en jungiaanse psychologie, Lemniscaat.
  • Quidquid discis, tibi discis
    • Translation: "Whatever you learn, you learn it for yourself.”
    • Arbiter, P. and W. D. Lowe (1905). Petronii Cena Trimalchionis, D. Bell and co.
  • Quidquid latine dictum, altum videtur.
    • Translation: "Whatever is said in Latin seems profound."
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 965. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Quieta non movere
    • Translation: "Don't move settled things" (i.e. "Don't rock the boat", "Let sleeping dogs lie.”)
    • McKenna, M. (1996). The Captive Republic: A History of Republicanism in Australia, 1788-1996, Cambridge University Press.
  • Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
    • Translation: "Who will watch the watchers themselves?" or "Who will guard the guardians themselves?" (Juvenal)
    • Brown-John, C. L. (1981). Canadian regulatory agencies: quis custodiet ipsos custodes?, Butterworths.
  • Quod gratis asseritur, gratis negatur.
    • Translation: What is asserted gratuitously may be denied gratuitously.
    • Variants: What is asserted without evidence/proof/reason, may/can be dismissed/denied without evidence/proof/reason.
    • Jon R. Stone, The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations (2005), p. 101. Anonymous, widely used since at least the early 19th century (e.g. The Classical Journal , Vol. 40 (1829), p. 312).
  • Quod nocet, saepe docet
    • Translation: "That which harms, often teaches”
    • Meaning: Unpleasant experiences will make you wiser.
    • English equivalent: What does not kill you makes you stronger.
    • Hoffmann, K. J. (1836). Doppelte aus dem Klassikern gewählte Beispielsammlung für die Syntax der kleinen und grossen Grammatik von Zumpt: nebst einer Beispielsammlung für die Syntaxis ornata und einem Lesenbuche für Anfänger, Dümmler.

R[edit]

  • Rapiamus, amici, occasionem de die.
    • English equivalent: Opportunity knocks only once.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 400. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Rem tene verba sequentur.
    • Translation: If you know what you are talking about, then words came along. (Marco Porcio Catón)
    • Colish, M. L. (1985). The Stoic Tradition from Antiquity to the Early Middle Ages, E.J. Brill.
  • Repetita iuvant.
    • Translation: "Repetition is useful", or "Repeating things helps”.
    • Ghislotti, S. (2008). Repetita iuvant. Mnemotecniche del film narrativo, Sestante.
  • Repetitio est mater studiorum.
    • Translation: Repetition is the mother of study.
    • Stone, J. R. (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings, Routledge.
  • Roma die uno non aedificata est
    • Translation: Rome wasn't built in a day.
    • Kudla, H. (2001). Lexikon der lateinischen Zitate: 3500 Originale mit Übersetzungen und Belegstellen, Beck.

S[edit]

  • Salus aegroti suprema lex.
    • Translation: The well-being of the patient is the most important law.
    • Source: Giesen, Dieter (1988). International Medical Malpractice Law: A Comparative Law Study of Civil Liability Arising from Medical Care. BRILL. p. 457. ISBN 3166453229. 
  • Salus populi suprema lex esto.
    • Translation: Let the welfare of the people be the supreme law. (motto of the U.S. state of Missouri).
    • Source: Giesen, Dieter (1988). International Medical Malpractice Law: A Comparative Law Study of Civil Liability Arising from Medical Care. BRILL. p. 457. ISBN 3166453229. 
  • Sapere aude.
    • Translation: Dare to be wise. (Horace) (Motto of the University of New Brunswick)
    • Zanda, Rubene (2004). Sapere aude!: critical thinking in university studies in Latvia. pp. 135. ISBN 9984770648. 
  • Sapiens dominabitur astris.
    • Translation: A wise (man) will rule (or possibly, be ruled by) the stars.
    • Alt. Translation "A Wise Man Is Limited By The Stars"
    • Glick, Thomas F (2005). Medieval Science, Technology, and Medicine: An Encyclopedia. Routledge. p. 62. ISBN 0415969301. 
  • Sapiens omnia sua secum portat
    • Translation: A wise man takes everything he owns with himself. (i.e. in his head, his wealth is his wisdom)
    • Meaning: Material assets are fleeting, but intellectual assets will basically stay with you the rest of your life. Therefore, intellectual assets are much more worth than material ones.
    • English equivalent: A good mind possess a kingdom.
    • J. Henle, Robert (1980). Latin Grammar. Loyola Press. p. 195. ISBN 0829401121. 
  • Sapientia abscondita et thesaurus invisus quae utilitas in utrisque.
    • Translation: The hidden things of wisdom and a treasure that is not seen, what profit is in them both?
    • English equivalent: Money is there to be spent.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1013. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Sapientia est potentia.
    • Translation: Wisdom is power.
    • Gulsun, Namik (2012). Master of Puppets: Seeds of Fate. AuthorHouse. p. 99. ISBN 1467881694. 
  • Scientia non habet inimicum nisi ignorantem.
    • Translation: Knowledge has no enemies but the ignorant.
    • Milton Martin, Richard (1980). Primordiality, Science, and Value. SUNY Press. p. 148. ISBN 0873954432. 
  • Senatores boni viri, senatus autem mala bestia
    • Translation: Senators are good men, however Senate is a malicious animal
    • Sedláček, Tomáš (2011). Economics of Good and Evil: The Quest for Economic Meaning from Gilgamesh to Wall Street. Oxford University Press. p. 266. ISBN 0199767203. 
  • Sermo hominum mores et celat et indicat idem.
    • English equivalent: Men talk only to conceal the mind.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1088. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Sepem vir calcat ibi plus ubi passio exstat.
    • English equivalent: Men leap over where the hedge is lower.
    • Note: Also knows as the Law of least effort.
    • Meaning: Always do things in a way that requires the absolut least amount of labor.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1087. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Serpens, nisi serpentem comederit, non fit draco.
    • Translation: A serpent, if it does not devour a serpent, does not become a dragon.
    • Francis Bacon, Essays (1612), apparently translating a Greek proverb.[3]
    • Michael Apostolius, Proverbs (15th century), translates the Greek proverb: Serpens nisi serpentem edat, non fiet draco.[4]
    • Erasmus, Adages (16th century), translates the Greek proverb: Serpens ni edat serpentem, draco non fiet.[5]
    • Attributed to Pliny the Elder (Natural History, c. 77-79 AD) by Richard Brathwaite,[6] but Robert Nares believes Brathwaite is mistaken.[3] A search of the text returns many remarks on dragons and serpents, but nothing like this statement.
  • Si cazares, no te alabes; si no cazares, no te enfades.
    • English equivalent: If fortune favours, beware of being exalted; if fortune thunders, beware of being overwhelmed.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1001. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Si fueris Romae, Romano vivito more, si fueris alibi, vivito sicut ibi.
    • Translation: If you are in Rome, live in the Roman way, if you are somewhere else, live like there. (attributed to Ambrose of Milan)
    • English equivalent: When in Rome, do as the Romans.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 673. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Si hîc esses, seires qua me vellicent.
    • English equivalent: No one knows where the shoe pinches, but he who wears it.
    • Meaning: "Nobody can fully understand another person's hardship or suffering."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 289. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 4. 
  • Sic Parvis Magna.
    • Translation: "Greatness from Small Beginnings."
    • Burke, Bernard (1864). The general armory of England, Scotland, Ireland, and wales: comprising a registry of armorial bearings from the earliest to the present time. Harrison & sons. p. 299. 
  • Silent leges inter arma.
    • Translation: "During war, laws are silent." (Cicero)
    • Walzer, Michael (2006). Just And Unjust Wars: A Moral Argument With Historical Illustrations. Basic Books. p. 3. ISBN 0465037070. 
  • Si vis pacem, para bellum.
    • Translation: "If you want peace, prepare for war."
    • Paraphrase of Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum (Vegetius, Epitoma rei militaris)
    • Origin of the name parabellum for some ammunition and firearms, e.g. Luger parabellum
    • Wallerfelt, Bengt (1999). Si VIS Pacem, Para Bellum: Svensk Sakerhetspolitik Och Krigsplanering 1945-1975. Probus. p. X. ISBN 9187184605. 
  • Si vis pacem, para iustitiam.
    • Translation: "If you want peace, prepare justice."
    • Keogh, Dermot (2008). Gerald Goldberg: A Tribute. Mercier Press Ltd. p. 169. ISBN 1856355810. 
  • Silent enim leges inter arma
    • Translation: "Laws are silent in times of war"
    • Cryer, Friman (2010). An Introduction to International Criminal Law and Procedure. Cambridge University Press. p. 270. ISBN 0521135818. 
  • Simia est simia, etiasmi purpura vestiatur.
    • English equivalent: "A golden bit does not make the horse any better."
    • Meaning: An ugly thing will remain ugly even if its appeareance is taken care of.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 52. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Some remedies are worse than the disease.
    • Note: Specified as a Roman proverb in the source.
    • Stone (2006). Routledge Dictionary of World Proverbs. Taylor \& Francis. p. 357. 
  • Stultorum est se alienis immiscere negotiis.
    • English equivalent: Give neither salt nor counsel till you are asked for it.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 60. 
  • Summum ius summa inuria.
    • Translation: "More law, less justice." (Cicero, De officiis I, 10, 33)
    • Whittaker, Simon (2000). Good Faith in European Contract Law. Cambridge University Press. p. 65. ISBN 0521771900. 
  • Sunt facta verbis difficiliora
    • Translation: "Works are harder than words."
    • English equivalent: "Easier said than done."
    • Shackleton-Bailey, D. R. (2004). Cicero: Epistulae Ad Quintum Fratrem Et M. Brutum. Cambridge University Press. p. 49. ISBN 0521607000. 
  • Sunt pueri pueri pueri puerilia tractant
    • Translation: "Boys are boys and boys will act like boys."
    • Stone, Jon R. (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings Latin for the Illiterati Series. Routledge. p. 115. ISBN 0415969085. 
    • English equivalent: Boys will be boys.
  • Sutor, ne ultra crepidam!
    • Translation: "Cobbler, no further than the sandal!" I.e. don't offer your opinion on things that are outside your competence. It is said that the Greek painter Apelles once asked the advice of a cobbler on how to render the sandals of a soldier he was painting. When the cobbler started offering advice on other parts of the painting, Apelles rebuked him with this phrase (but in Greek).
    • Sutor ne ultra crepidam, oder ein jeder bleib bey seinem Handwerck: In einem mit Nachsetzung seines Handwerks allzu weit über die Schnur hauenden Schmidt, zu einem Faßnacht-Hainzl vorgestellt in Seminario Cler. Saec. In Com. Vir. Zu Ingolstadt. 1740. 
  • Suum cuique Pulchrum.
    • Translation: To each its own is beautiful.
    • English equivalent: The bird loves her own nest.
    • Divers Proverbs, Nathan Bailey, 1721 [2]

T[edit]

  • Tarde venientibus ossa.
    • Translation: "For those who come late, only the bones."
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 625. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Tempora aptari decet.
    • Translation: Times should be adapted to.
    • English equivalent: Take things as you find them.
    • Meaning: Adapt yourself to new surroundings or conditions. For instance, if you are ill, do what you still can instead of waiting to get healthy.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 865. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Tempori parce!
    • Translation: "Save time!"
    • Gottlob Zumpt, Karl (1836). A grammar of the Latin language (4 ed.). B. Fellowes. p. 275. 
  • Tempus fugit.
    • Translation: "Time flees." (i.e., "time flies"). Originally as Sed fugit interea, fugit irreparabile tempus - translation: "Meanwhile the irreplaceable time flees" (Virgil)
    • English equivalent: Time and tide waits for none.
    • Almond, Frank (2002). Tempus Fugit. C&M Online Media. ISBN 0917990501. 
  • Tempus fugit, aeternitas manet.
    • Translation: "Time flees, eternity dwells."
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volume 1 (illustrerad ed.). p. 625. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Tempus fugit, amor manet.
    • Translation: "Time flees, love stays"
    • (Edith) Nesbit, E (2010). Man and Maid. Echo Library. p. 10. ISBN 1406895598. 
  • Timendi causa est nescire.
    • Translation: "The cause of fear is ignorance." (Seneca)
    • R. Stone, Jon (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings (illustrerad ed.). Routledge. p. 118. ISBN 0415969093. 
  • Tres faciunt collegium.
    • Translation: "Three makes a company."
    • Berger, Adolf (1953). Encyclopedic Dictionary of Roman Law, Volym 43 Transactions of the American Philosophical Society. American Philosophical Society. p. 742. ISBN 0871694328. 
  • Tolle, lege; Tolle, lege!
    • Translation: "Take up and read; take up and read!" (Augustinus)
    • J. Teske, Roland (2011). Tolle Lege: Essays on Augustine and on Medieval Philosophy in Honor of Roland J. Teske, Sj Utgåva 73 av Marquette Studies in Philosophy. Marquette University Press. pp. 364. ISBN 0874628075. 
  • Tunc tua res agitur, paries cum proximus ardet.
    • Translation: "It also concerns you when the nearest wall is burning."
    • R. Stone, Jon (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings (illustrerad ed.). Routledge. p. 119. ISBN 0415969093. 

U[edit]

  • Ut salutas (saltus), ita salutaberis oder Malo arboris nodo malus clavus and cuneus infigendus est.
    • English equivalent: What goes around comes around.
    • Meaning: Good acts quite often reward themselves. Conversely, bad acts quite often punish themselves.
    • Lautenbach, Ernst (2002). Latein-Deutsch: Zitaten-Lexikon: Quellennachweise. LIT Verlag Münster. p. 646. ISBN 3825856526. 
  • Ubi bene, ibi patria
    • Translation: "Where one feels good, there is one's country."
    • Adeleye, Gabriel (1999). World Dictionary of Foreign Expressions: A Resource for Readers and Writers. Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers. p. 389. ISBN 0865164231. 
  • Ubi concordia, ibi victoria.
    • Translation: "Where there is harmony, there is victory."
    • Webb, Amy (2006). The Devil's Duty. Lulu.com. pp. 212. ISBN 1411649842. 
  • Ubi dubium, ibi libertas.
    • Translation: "Where there is doubt, there is freedom." legal, meaning when in doubt the prisoner has to be freed.
    • Greener, Richard (2006). The Lacey Confession. Llewellyn Worldwide. p. 420. ISBN 0738708704. 
  • Ubi fumus, ibi ignis.
    • Translation: "Where there's smoke, there's fire."
    • Meaning: Where there are the signs of something, something is there.
    • Thomasius, Christian (1715). Cautelae circa doctrinam de praesumptione allodialitatis. p. 29. 
  • Ulula cum lupis, cum quibus esse cupis.
    • Translation: "Who keeps company with wolves, will learn to howl."
    • Meaning: You will become like the people you surround yourself with.
    • Tournoy, Gilbert (1993). Humanistica Lovaniensia. Leuven University Press. p. 32. ISBN 9061865719. 
  • Uni navi ne committas omnia.
    • Translation: Do not commit all to one boat.
    • English equivalent: Don't put all your eggs in the same basket.
    • Meaning: "Spread your risks or investments so that if one enterprise fails you will not lose everything."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 63. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 18 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 715. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Una hirundo non facit ver
    • Translation: "One swallow doesn't make spring"
    • Meaning: A solitary event is no indication that a major change is taking place.
    • Vergil, Polydore (1663). Polydori Virgilii De Rerum Inventoribus (nytryck ed.). Ayer Publishing. p. xii. ISBN 0833715631. 
  • Unum castigabis, centum emendabis.
    • Translation: For one reprimand, a hundred corrections."
    • Lautenbach, Ernst (2002). Latein-Deutsch: Zitaten-Lexikon: Quellennachweise. LIT Verlag Münster. p. 129. ISBN 3825856526. 
  • Usus magister est optimus.
    • Translation: "Experience is the best teacher." (i.e., "Practice makes perfect.")
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 698. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Ut ameris, amabilis esto.
    • Translation: "Be amiable, then you'll be loved."
    • Stone, J. R. (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings, Routledge.
  • Ut desint vires, tamen est laudanda voluntas
    • Translation: "Even if the powers are missing, the will deserves praise" (Ovid)
    • Kirk Rappaport, Pamela (2005). Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz: Selected Writings. Paulist Press. p. 290. ISBN 0809105306. 
  • Ut sementem feceris, ita metes.
    • Translation: "You'll reap what you sow." (Cicero, "De oratore"); The Bible Job 4:8; Galatians 6:7.
    • English equivalent: What you reap is what you sow.
    • Sloman, Arthur (1928). a grammar of classical latin. CUP Archive. p. 343. 
  • Ut sis nocte levis, sit cena brevis!
    • Translation: "That your sleeping hour be peaceful, let your dining hour be brief!" (Sis is one hour before sunset.) (modern: Sleep hard, Sleep fast, Sleep well)
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 818. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Uxor formosa et vinum sunt dulcia venena.
    • Translation: "Beautiful women and wine are sweet venom."
    • Beudel, Paul (1911). Qua ratione Graeci liberos docuerint, papyris, ostracis, tabulis in Aegypto inventis illustratur: commentationem philologicam. E Typographia Aschendorffiana. p. 32. 

V[edit]

  • Varitatio delectat
  • Vasa vana plurimum sonant
    • Translation: Empty pots make the most noise.
    • English equivalent: It is not the hen that cackles the most that lay the most eggs.
    • Meaning: It is not he who advertises for himself that can achieve the greatest results.
    • Macdonnel, David Evans (1869). A dictionary of select and popular quotations, which are in daily use: taken from the Latin, French, Greek, Spanish and Italian languages : together with a copious collection of law-maxims and law-terms translated into English, with illustrations historical and idiomatic (6 ed.). Claxton, Remsen & Haffelfinger. p. 296. 
  • Ventis secundis, tene cursum.
    • Translation: Go even against the flow.
    • Mesiah, Leza M. (2007). Recipes for Recovery: How to Heal Loss and a Broken Heart. AuthorHouse. p. 138. ISBN 1425965954. 
  • Verba docent, exempla trahunt.
    • Translation: Words instruct, illustrations lead.
    • Rautenberg, Wolfgang (2009). A Concise Introduction to Mathematical Logi (3, illustrerad ed.). Springer. p. 58. ISBN 1441912207. 
  • Verba volant, scripta manent.
    • Translation: Words fly, written stays.
    • English equivalent: Paper is forbearing.
    • C. Gerhart, Eugene (1998). Quote It Completely!: World Reference Guide to More Than 5,500 Memorable Quotations from Law and Literature Quote it Completely!: World Reference Guide to More Than 5,500 Memorable Quotations from Law and Literature, Eugene C. Gerhart,. Wm. S. Hein Publishing. p. 1171. ISBN 1575884003. 
  • Verit eo caudam, qua decidit arbore, malum.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Veritas odium paret
    • Translation: Truth creates hatred. (Terence, Andria 68)
    • Sacul, Snofla (2011). If Only God Used His Brain: Ahead of Time. Xlibris Corporation. p. 149. ISBN 146533565X. 
  • Veritas vos liberabit
    • Translation: The truth will set you free. (Gospel of John, 8:32)
    • Sand, Charlene (2012). Veritas Vos Liberabit: An Unauthorized Guide to the Johns Hopkins University. Webster's Digital Services. pp. 148. ISBN 1276154968. 
  • Veritatem dies aperit.
    • Translation: Time discloses the truth.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1206. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Vincit omnia veritas.
    • Translation: Truth conquers all.
    • Stone, Jon R. (1996). Latin for the Illiterati: Exorcizing the Ghosts of a Dead Language Classics, Language, Reference. Routledge. p. 150. ISBN 0415917751. 
  • Vincit qui patitur. - motto Berea College, Berea, KY
    • Translation: He who perseveres, conquers.
    • English equivalent: Persevere and never fear; By perseverance the snail reached the arc.
    • Olive Emmons, Mary (2009). Moods and Whims. READ BOOKS. p. 53. ISBN 1444678787. 
  • Vipera in verpecula est.
    • English equivalent: Look before you leap, for snakes among sweet flowers do creep.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1070. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Vir fugiens et denuo pugnabit.
    • Translation: The man fled, and he will fight anew.
    • English equivalent: He who fights and runs away may live to fight another day.
    • Meaning: "It is wiser to withdraw from a situation that you cannot win than to go on fighting and lose – by a strategic retreat you can return to the battle or argument with renewed energy at a later date."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 123. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 702. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Vivit post funera virtus.
    • Translation: Virtue survives the grave.
    • Henry Thomas Riley (1856). Dictionary of Latin Quotations, Proverbs, Maxims, and Mottos, Classical and Mediaeval. p. 503. 
  • Vulpes pilum mutat, non mores!
    • Translation: A fox may change its skin but never its character. - Suetonius
    • English equivalent A leopard won't change its spots.
    • Lautenbach, Ernst (2002). Latein-Deutsch: Zitaten-Lexikon: Quellennachweise. LIT Verlag Münster. p. 425. ISBN 3825856526. 

W[edit]

  • We receive nothing with so much reluctance as advice.
    • Note: Specified as a Roman proverb in the source.
    • English equivalent: Advice most needed is the least heeded.
    • Stone (2006). Routledge Dictionary of World Proverbs. Taylor \& Francis. p. 8. 

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • O'Shea, Stephen (2000). The Perfect Heresy: The Revolutionary Life and Death of the Medieval Cathars. ISBN 0-8027-1350-5.
  • Jenny's First Year Latin

Notes[edit]

  1. Classical and foreign quotations, William Francis Henry King, 1889, p. 40, quote #300
  2. Larry D. Benson, ed. The Riverside Chaucer. 3rd ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1987. p. 939, n. 3164.
  3. a b Robert Nares, A Glossary, p. 781.
  4. Michael Apostolius, Paroemiae [Proverbs]. Ed. Daniel Heinsius. Leiden, 1619. p. 187
  5. Erasmus III iii 61, translated in William Watson Barker, ed. The Adages of Erasmus, p. 272
  6. Richard Brathwaite, The English Gentleman 1630, p. 237.

External links[edit]