Locksley Hall

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"Locksley Hall" is a poem written by Alfred Tennyson in 1835 and published in his 1842 volume of Poems. Though one of his masterworks, it is less well-known than his other literature. While narrating the emotions of a weary soldier come to his childhood home, the fictional Locksley Hall, it also furnished interesting predictions about a future world government.

Quotes[edit]

I remember one that perish'd: sweetly did she speak and move:
Such a one do I remember, whom to look at was to love.
  • Comrades, leave me here a little, while as yet 'tis early morn:
    Leave me here, and when you want me, sound upon the bugle horn.
  • In the Spring a livelier iris changes on the burnish'd dove;
    In the Spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love.
    • Line 19.
  • Love took up the harp of Life, and smote on all the chords with might;
    Smote the chord of Self, that, trembling, passed in music out of sight.
    • Line 33.
  • He will hold thee, when his passion shall have spent its novel force,
    Something better than his dog, a little dearer than his horse.
    • Line 49.
  • Never, tho' my mortal summers to such length of years should come
    As the many-winter'd crow that leads the clanging rookery home.
  • I remember one that perish'd: sweetly did she speak and move:
    Such a one do I remember, whom to look at was to love.
  • Comfort? comfort scorn'd of devils! this is truth the poet sings,
    That a sorrow's crown of sorrow is remembering happier things.
    • Line 75.
  • Like a dog, he hunts in dreams, and thou art staring at the wall,
    Where the dying night-lamp flickers, and the shadows rise and fall.
    • Line 79.
  • O, I see thee old and formal, fitted to thy petty part,
    With a little hoard of maxims preaching down a daughter's heart.
    • Line 94.
  • What is that which I should turn to, lighting upon days like these?
    Every door is barred with gold, and opens but to golden keys.

    Every gate is thronged with suitors, all the markets overflow.
    I have but an angry fancy: what is that which I should do?

    I had been content to perish, falling on the foeman's ground,
    When the ranks are rolled in vapour, and the winds are laid with sound.

    But the jingling of the guinea helps the hurt that Honour feels,
    And the nations do but murmur, snarling at each other's heels.

    • Line 105.
For I dipped into the future, far as human eye could see,
Saw the Vision of the world, and all the wonder that would be...
  • Make me feel the wild pulsation that I felt before the strife,
    When I heard my days before me, and the tumult of my life
    ;
    Yearning for the large excitement that the coming years would yield,
    Eager-hearted as a boy when first he leaves his father's field
I doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs, And the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.
  • Men, my brothers, men the workers, ever reaping something new:
    That which they have done but earnest of the things that they shall do:

    For I dipped into the future, far as human eye could see,
    Saw the Vision of the world, and all the wonder that would be;

    Saw the heavens fill with commerce, argosies of magic sails,
    Pilots of the purple twilight, dropping down with costly bales
    ;

    Heard the heavens fill with shouting, and there rained a ghastly dew
    From the nations' airy navies grappling in the central blue;

    Far along the world-wide whisper of the south-wind rushing warm,
    With the standards of the peoples plunging through the thunderstorm;

    Till the war-drum throbbed no longer, and the battle-flags were furled
    In the Parliament of man, the Federation of the world.

    There the common sense of most shall hold a fretful realm in awe,
    And the kindly earth shall slumber, lapped in universal law.

    • Line 117.
  • So I triumphed ere my passion sweeping through me left me dry,
    Left with the palsied heart, and left me with the jaundiced eye
    ;

    Eye, to which all order festers, all things here are out of joint:
    Science moves, but slowly slowly, creeping on from point to point:

    Slowly comes a hungry people, as a lion creeping nigher,
    Glares at one that nods and winks behind a slowly-dying fire.

    Yet I doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs,
    And the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.

    • Line 137.
Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers, and I linger on the shore,
And the individual withers, and the world is more and more.
  • Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers, and I linger on the shore,
    And the individual withers, and the world is more and more.
    • Line 141.
  • Woman is the lesser man, and all thy passions, match'd with mine,
    Are as moonlight unto sunlight, and as water unto wine —
  • There the passions cramp'd no longer shall have scope and breathing-space;
    I will take some savage woman, she shall rear my dusky race.
    • Line 168.
  • Mated with a squalid savage — what to me were sun or clime?
    I the heir of all the ages, in the foremost files of time —
    • Line 178.
  • Not in vain the distance beacons. Forward, forward let us range.
    Let the great world spin for ever down the ringing grooves of change.
    • Line 182.
  • Thro' the shadow of the globe we sweep into the younger day:
    Better fifty years of Europe than a cycle of Cathay.
    • Line 184.
  • Comes a vapour from the margin, blackening over heath and holt,
    Cramming all the blast before it, in its breast a thunderbolt.

    Let it fall on Locksley Hall, with rain or hail, or fire or snow;
    For the mighty wind arises, roaring seaward, and I go.

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