Max Ernst

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Max Ernst had his first contact with the sensible world, when he came out of the egg which his mother had laid in an eagle's nest and which the bird had brooded for seven years.
Art has nothing to do with taste, art is not there to be "tasted".

Max Ernst (2 April 18911 April 1976) was a German painter and sculptor who worked in the styles of Dadaism, Surrealism, and Abstract Expressionism.

Quotes[edit]

  • A series of powers are at work within the great stream of Expressionism who have no outward similarity to one another but a common direction of thrust, namely the intention to give expression to things of the psyche [Seelisches] through form alone.
    • In a newspaper review of "Rhenish Expressionists" in Bonn (1913), as quoted in Expressionism (2004) by Norbert Wolf
  • The 2nd of April (1891) at 9:45 a.m. Max Ernst had his first contact with the sensible world, when he came out of the egg which his mother had laid in an eagle's nest and which the bird had brooded for seven years.
    • "Some Data on the Youth of M. E., As Told by Himself" in the View (April 1942); also quoted in Max Ernst and Alchemy (2001) by M. E. Warlick, p. 10
  • Max Ernst died the 1st of August 1914. He resuscitated the 11th of November 1918 as a young man aspiring to become a magician and to find the myth of his time.
    • "Some Data on the Youth of M. E., As Told by Himself" in the View (April 1942); also quoted in Max Ernst and Alchemy (2001) by M. E. Warlick, p. 17
  • Art has nothing to do with taste, art is not there to be "tasted". Yet a certain mayor believes that art exists to be "judged", and the most modern art to be "judged from a business point of view". That such an original thought could emerge from a mayor's brain! What the mayor wants is exactly what the critics of the large and small dailies actually do. They set out to judge art. That is a very pleasant occupation, because no matter how wrong a judgment may be, you never have to revise it. The art judges talk about "ability" and complain that the "younger generation" has lost this ability. Sometimes their complaints are even seriously intended. But, gentlemen, do you really know what that is — ability? No, you don't.
    • As quoted in Max Ernst : Sculptures (1996) by Max Ernst, Jürgen Pech, and Ida Gianelli, p. 11

External links[edit]

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