Neal A. Maxwell

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Neal Ash Maxwell (1926-07-06 – 2004-07-21) Elder Neal A. Maxwell served as a member of the Council of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from July 23, 1981 to July 21, 2004. He served as a member of the Presidency of the First Quorum of the Seventy from 1976 to 1981, and as an Assistant to the Twelve from 1974 to 1976.

Sourced[edit]

  • Indeed, one of the most cruel games anyone can play with self is the "not yet" game—hoping to sin just a bit more before ceasing; to enjoy the praise of the world a little longer before turning away from the applause; to win just once more in the wearying sweepstakes of materialism; to be chaste, but not yet; to be good neighbors, but not now. One can play upon the harp-strings of hesitations and reservations just so long, and then one faces that special moment—a moment when what has been sensed, mutely, suddenly finds voice and cries out with tears, "Lord, I believe; help thou mine unbelief." (Mark 9:24)
    • Why Not Now?, Ensign, Nov. 1974, p. 12 ([1])
  • I have on my office wall a wise and useful reminder by Anne Morrow Lindbergh concerning one of the realities of life. She wrote, "My life cannot implement in action the demands of all the people to whom my heart responds." That's good counsel for us all, not as an excuse to forgo duty, but as a sage point about pace and the need for quality in relationships.
    • Deposition of a Disciple, 1976, Deseret Book Co. (Salt Lake City), p. 5
  • The good life is the best preparation for bad times.
    • Wherefore Ye Must Press Forward, 1977, Deseret Book Co. (Salt Lake City), p. 32
  • A few little flowers will spring up briefly in the dry gulley through which torrents of water pass occasionally. But it is steady streams that bring thick and needed crops. In the agriculture of the soul that has to do with nurturing attributes, flash floods are no substitute for regular irrigation."
    • Notwithstanding My Weakness, 1981, Deseret Book Co. (Salt Lake City, Utah), pg. 7
  • Being popular can become narcotic. We can come to crave it and to need the frequent "fixes" brought by the world’s praise and caresses of recognition. A turned head bows much less easily.
    Popularity is dangerous especially because it focuses us on ourselves rather than keeping us attentive to the needs of others. We become preoccupied with self and with being noticed, letting those in real need "pass by" us, and we "notice them not" (Morm. 8:39). It is a sad fact, therefore, that popularity gets in the way of our keeping both of the two great commandments!" (See Matt. 22:36–40.)
    • Popularity and Principle, Ensign, Mar. 1995, p. 12 Ensign
  • Mostly, brothers and sisters, we become the victims of our own wrong desires. Moreover, we live in an age when many simply refuse to feel responsible for themselves. Thus, a crystal-clear understanding of the doctrines pertaining to desire is so vital because of the spreading effluent oozing out of so many unjustified excuses by so many. This is like a sludge which is sweeping society along toward "the gulf of misery and endless wo" (Hel. 5:12). Feeding that same flow is the selfish philosophy of "no fault," which is replacing the meek and apologetic "my fault." We listen with eager ear to hear genuine pleas for forgiveness instead of the ritualistic "Sorry. I hope I can forgive myself."
    • According to the Desire of [Our] Hearts, Ensign, Nov. 1996, p. 21 Ensign

External links[edit]

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The Neal A. Maxwell Institute (http://farms.byu.edu/)