Neglect

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Neglect or negligence is the disregarding or paying of little attention to something, particularly when this involved the failure to care for or attend to something due to oversight or carelessness. In law, negligence that leads to an injury may be compensable.

Sourced[edit]

  • A wise and salutary neglect.
    • Edmund Burke, Speech on the Conciliation of America (1775), Volume II, p. 117.
  • Give me a look, give me a face,
    That makes simplicity a grace:
    Robes loosely flowing, hair as free;
    Such sweet neglect more taketh me
    Than all the adulteries of art;
    They strike mine eyes, but not my heart.
    • Ben Jonson, The Silent Woman (1609), Act I, scene 1.
  • I consider a good reputation is a great part of the human happiness. Some people, if they are very, very rich can permit themselves certain negligence to their reputations.
    • Aristotle Onassis, quoted in Peter Evans, Ari: Life and Times of Aristotle Socrates Onassis, (1978), (p. 73 in the 1986 Summit Books edition).
  • His noble negligences teach
    What others' toils despair to reach.
  • There is a great Man living in this country — a composer. He has solved the problem how to preserve one's self and to learn. He responds to negligence by contempt. He is not forced to accept praise or blame. His name is Ives.
  • The negligence of Nature wide and wild,
    Where, undisguised by mimic art, she spreads
    Unbounded beauty to the roving eye.

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