October 4

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Quotes of the day from previous years:

2004
As for myself, I always willingly acknowledge my own self as the principal cause of every good and of every evil which may befall me; therefore I have always found myself capable of being my own pupil, and ready to love my teacher. ~ Giacomo Casanova
2005
If we do discover a complete theory, it should in time be understandable in broad principle by everyone, not just a few scientists. Then we shall all, philosophers, scientists, and just ordinary people, be able to take part in the discussion of the question of why it is that we and the universe exist. If we find the answer to that, it would be the ultimate triumph of human reason — for then we would know the mind of God. ~ Stephen Hawking
2006
A comedian does funny things. A good comedian does things funny. ~ Buster Keaton (born 4 October 1895)
2007
Personally I do not resort to force — not even the force of law — to advance moral reforms. I prefer education, argument, persuasion, and above all the influence of example — of fashion. ~ Rutherford B. Hayes (born 4 October 1822)
2008
The quicker humanity advances, the more important it is to be the one who deals the first blow. ~ Ernst Kaltenbrunner (born 4 October 1903)
2009
The real difficulty is with the vast wealth and power in the hands of the few and the unscrupulous who represent or control capital. Hundreds of laws of Congress and the state legislatures are in the interest of these men and against the interests of workingmen. These need to be exposed and repealed. All laws on corporations, on taxation, on trusts, wills, descent, and the like, need examination and extensive change. This is a government of the people, by the people, and for the people no longer. It is a government of corporations, by corporations, and for corporations. — How is this? ~ Rutherford B. Hayes
2010
Disunion and civil war are at hand; and yet I fear disunion and war less than compromise. We can recover from them. The free States alone, if we must go on alone, will make a glorious nation. ~ Rutherford B. Hayes
2011
The unrestricted competition so commonly advocated does not leave us the survival of the fittest. The unscrupulous succeed best in accumulating wealth.. ~ Rutherford B. Hayes
2012
For honest merit to succeed amid the tricks and intrigues which are now so lamentably common, I know is difficult; but the honor of success is increased by the obstacles which are to be surmounted. Let me triumph as a man or not at all.
~ Rutherford B. Hayes ~
2013
General education is the best preventive of the evils now most dreaded. In the civilized countries of the world, the question is how to distribute most generally and equally the property of the world. As a rule, where education is most general the distribution of property is most general.... As knowledge spreads, wealth spreads. To diffuse knowledge is to diffuse wealth. To give all an equal chance to acquire knowledge is the best and surest way to give all an equal chance to acquire property.
~ Rutherford B. Hayes ~
2014
Buster survives tornados, waterfalls, avalanches of boulders, and falls from great heights, and never pauses to take a bow: He has his eye on his goal. And his movies, seen as a group, are like a sustained act of optimism in the face of adversity; surprising, how without asking, he earns our admiration and tenderness.
Because he was funny, because he wore a porkpie hat, Keaton's physical skills are often undervalued … no silent star did more dangerous stunts than Buster Keaton. Instead of using doubles, he himself doubled for his actors, doing their stunts as well as his own.
~ Roger Ebert ~
2015 
Rank or add further suggestions…

Ranking system:

4 : Excellent - should definitely be used.
3 : Very Good - strong desire to see it used.
2 : Good - some desire to see it used.
1 : Acceptable - but with no particular desire to see it used.
0 : Not acceptable - not appropriate for use as a quote of the day.


Suggestions[edit]

There is no human law or law of God or national law that states that any healthy being has to permit the snake to eat the mouse - but on the other hand, it is perfectly justified to defend the mouse. ~ Ernst Kaltenbrunner (born October 4)

  • 4 because the underdog will always be protected by law and this is a great description of that defense, beautifully and morally personified by the snake and the mouse. Zarbon 05:50, 18 April 2008 (UTC)
    • SOURCE: The Nuremberg Interviews By Leon Goldensohn, Robert Gellately - Page 151
  • 1 Kalki 21:55, 3 October 2009 (UTC) * 2 Kalki 19:14, 2 October 2008 (UTC) the quote itself is acceptable, but I am not sure of the context in which Kaltenrunner is using this assertion, and feel uneasy giving it anything more than a 1 until I know more about this.
    • The assertion is a response to someone asking him whether mankind stands up for itself, and his response to that is that mankind stands up for the underdog, and interprets the phrase beautifully with the mouse and snake as a personification. - Zarbon 22:56, 3 October 2009 (UTC)
I remain disinclined to rank this any higher than I currently have, which is the highest you have ranked any other suggestion on this date, most of which I consider to have far more merit. I actually used your previous suggestion by Kaltenbrunner last year, despite my severe distaste for him. In relation to some of the points of this quote, I would say that sometimes the underdogs are worthy in many ways which make them worth supporting, or at least wishing well, but sometimes the underdog is rightfully the underdog, and remains so, especially when there is plainly a will to to unjustly oppress others, deceive them or confuse them.
I don't actually rely on even the best of "over-dogs" being continually magnanimous, or even fair, but sometimes it is far better that some of the less than perfect ones remain so, than that they be in any way defeated or replaced by some of the severely deluded and demented underdogs who lust to be as brutal as they desire to be. ~ Kalki 00:55, 4 October 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 23:14, 3 October 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 I am all for it as long as the talk is only of something looking "justified" or not -- wallow in sentimentality for all I care. But I am against Law entering the issue. N6n 14:45, 15 September 2010 (UTC)

The President of the United States of necessity owes his election to office to the suffrage and zealous labors of a political party, the members of which cherish with ardor and regard as of essential importance the principles of their party organization; but he should strive to be always mindful of the fact that he serves his party best who serves the country best. ~ Rutherford B. Hayes (born October 4, 1822)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 08:49, 3 October 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 17:42, 22 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 19:14, 2 October 2008 (UTC) with a strong lean toward 4.
  • 3 //Gbern3 (talk) 03:28, 16 August 2013 (UTC)

Unjust attacks on public men do them more good than unmerited praise. ~ Rutherford B. Hayes

  • 3 InvisibleSun 08:49, 3 October 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 00:14, 4 October 2007 (UTC) with a strong lean toward 4.
  • 1 Zarbon 17:42, 22 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 //Gbern3 (talk) 03:28, 16 August 2013 (UTC) I don't get it.

One of the tests of the civilization of people is the treatment of its criminals. ~ Rutherford B. Hayes

  • 3 InvisibleSun 08:49, 3 October 2007 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 00:14, 4 October 2007 (UTC) with a lean toward 4.
  • 1 Zarbon 17:42, 22 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 //Gbern3 (talk) 03:28, 16 August 2013 (UTC)

Every age has its temptations, its weaknesses, its dangers. Ours is in the line of the snobbish and the sordid. ~ Rutherford B. Hayes

  • 3 Kalki 21:55, 3 October 2009 (UTC) with a lean toward 4.
  • 1 Zarbon 22:56, 3 October 2009 (UTC)
  • 1 //Gbern3 (talk) 03:28, 16 August 2013 (UTC)

The melancholy thing in our public life is the insane desire to get higher. ~ Rutherford B. Hayes

  • 3 Kalki 21:55, 3 October 2009 (UTC) with a lean toward 4.
  • 1 Zarbon 22:56, 3 October 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 //Gbern3 (talk) 03:28, 16 August 2013 (UTC)

I have a talent for silence and brevity. I can keep silent when it seems best to do so, and when I speak I can, and do usually, quit when I am done. This talent, or these two talents, I have cultivated. Silence and concise, brief speaking have got me some laurels, and, I suspect, lost me some. No odds. Do what is natural to you, and you are sure to get all the recognition you are entitled to. ~ Rutherford B. Hayes

  • 3 Kalki 21:55, 3 October 2009 (UTC) with a lean toward 4.
  • 1 Zarbon 22:56, 3 October 2009 (UTC)
  • 3 N6n 14:45, 15 September 2010 (UTC)
  • 2 //Gbern3 (talk) 03:28, 16 August 2013 (UTC)

Buster Keaton … will be around forever, because it's unlikely that human beings will ever go out-of-date the way special effects do.
~ Anthony Puccinelli ~

Watch his mind as it contemplates a hostile universe whose violent whims Buster understands, withstands and, miraculously, tames. Watch his camera taking his picture (Keaton directed or supervised all his best films); it is as cool as the star it captured in its glass... The medium was still in its infancy; comics were pioneering the craft of making people laugh at moving images. Keaton, it turns out, knew it all — intuitively.
~ Richard Corliss ~