Panaji

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The Baroque Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception Church is located overlooking the main square known as Praça da Igreja.

Panaji (Konkani: पणजी Panaje, pronounced [pɔɳɟĩ], [pɵɳɟiː] ( listen), Portuguese: Pangim, usually known in English as Panjim) is the capital of the Indian state of Goa.

Sources[edit]

Slung along the banks of the wide Mandovi River, Panaji (also still widely known by its former Portuguese name Panjim), Goa’s small and spritely state capital since 1843, boasts its own laid-back brand of originality...
Historical Mandovi area of Panaji
  • Slung along the banks of the wide Mandovi River, Panaji (also still widely known by its former Portuguese name Panjim), Goa’s small and spritely state capital since 1843, boasts its own laid-back brand of originality. Purpose-built neat and tidy by its former Portuguese colonisers, the city’s inhabitants have adapted its European-flavoured legacy to suit their affluent and easygoing needs.
  • Historical accounts of this place date back to Kadamba King Shasthadeva (1007-1050). An inscription of the Kadamba King Vijayaditya I, dated 7 February 1107 refers to Panajim as Pahajani Khali. Another interpretation of the name is that Panji or Ponji is said to mean the “land that never gets flooded”. Yet another interpretation is that it is a variation of Pancha Yma Afsumgary or five wonderful castles where the Muslim King Ismail Adil Shah and his wives used to live. The name was later changed to Panjim by the Portuguese and when Old Goa collapsed in the 19th century, Panjim was elevated to the status of a city on 22 March 1843 and was renamed “Nova Goa”. After Liberation in 1961 it was known as “Panaji”.
  • Panjim was originally a neglected ward of Taleigão village. The only conspicuous construction was the 15th century castle built by Adil Shah on the left bank of the Mandovi. Viceroy Dom Manuel de Saldanha de Albuquerque, of Ega, remodelled the old castle and a palace was built which was later used as the Government Secretariat.
    • City Corporation, in "Panaji and its history Corporation of the City of Panaji".
  • Among Goa’s cities, Panaji is great place simply to wander with the old quarters, Fontainhas and Sao Tome still bearing a distinctive Portuguese influence.
  • Much of the area on which Panaji stands was originally marshland...in around 1500 came under the control of Muslim leader Yusuf Adil Shah who built a fortress to guard the entrance to the Mandovi, which was later known as Idalcoa’s palace under Portuguese rule.
    • Paul Harding, in “Goa (2003)”, p. 110
  • Afonso de Albuquerque took the fort in 1510 and reinforced it initially after occupation and again in November after reoccupation... It is said that he was in such a hurry to complete the strengthen the fortifications before the next Muslim attack that even his officers were pressed into manual labour. **Paul Harding, in “Goa (2003)”,
    • Paul Harding, in “Goa (2003)”, p. 110
  • The small church built, around 1540 (where the present huge church Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception stands), was the first stop for the Portuguese sailors celebrating their safe arrival in India.
    • Paul Harding, in “Goa (2003)”, p. 110
  • In 19th century, as Panjim developed, in 1834 it became known as Nova Goa...and in 1843 it was recognized by the Portuguese government as capital of Goa.
    • Paul Harding, in “Goa (2003)”, P.111
  • Panjim loses much by close inspection.
    • Sir Richard Burton, in the 19th century on the poor and neglected status of development, in, “Goa (2003)”, in “Goa (2003)”, P.111
  • After Goa’s independence the city was renamed Panaji...a new flashy assembly complex was built, on a hill to its north in 2000.
    • Paul Harding, in “Goa (2003)”, P.111
  • Archaeologically, the St Inez Roman mooring stone with a distinct carving of Neptune reveals a story of booming Roman trade voyages touching Panaji port. Panaji was always respected as a relatively safe port and a hilly, wooded place with natural springs, lakes which supplied fresh water to the ocean going ships. The Portuguese did try to create a miniature Lisbon when they raised the city of Panaji to capital status in 1843 but while doing this they maintained a fine balance between open and developed spaces, land and water and created tree-lined avenues where only swamps existed.

Urban development[edit]

Shaikh Ali Ahmed and Dr. B. Shankar: A historical city known for its rich culture, architecture and built heritage situated on the bank of Mandovi estuary, Panaji is the important centre in terms of Indo-Portuguese cultural heritage, having a number of natural, built, tangible and intangible sites and monuments.
  • A historical city known for its rich culture, architecture and built heritage situated on the bank of Mandovi estuary, Panaji is the important centre in terms of Indo-Portuguese cultural heritage, having a number of natural, built, tangible and intangible sites and monuments.
    • Shaikh Ali Ahmed and Dr. B. Shankar, in “Challenges of Planning for Heritage Areas in Panaji City (Jan Feb 2012)”, p. 546
  • The unique cultural atmosphere is the result of the long absorbed 450 years of Portuguese rule. The influence has left a deep impact on the local traditions in all spheres and has formed a distinct cultural identity of the people. St. Francis Xavier was an instrument to carry with him the gospel of Jesus but more than that he also carried a way of life of people, their ethos and a rich culture.
    • Shaikh Ali Ahmed and Dr. B. Shankar, in “Challenges of Planning for Heritage Areas in Panaji City (Jan Feb 2012)”, p. 546
  • The city of Panaji is on the verge of getting developed from being part of fishing village of Taleigao in 1510 to a developed city in Goa. The evolution of the city has marked the achievement with the rise of many high rise buildings as a benchmark.
    • Shaikh Ali Ahmed and Dr. B. Shankar, in “Challenges of Planning for Heritage Areas in Panaji City (Jan Feb 2012)”, p. 548
The Fontainhas area continues to be a focal point for Heritage tourists and travellers with a taste of past glories. Interest in Panaji’s heritage buildings is worldwide. There are still clusters of quaint old houses in particular on one street...
  • The Fontainhas area continues to be a focal point for Heritage tourists and travellers with a taste of past glories. Interest in Panaji’s heritage buildings is worldwide. There are still clusters of quaint old houses in particular on one street in Portais and around St. Sebastian Chapel...
    • Shaikh Ali Ahmed and Dr. B. Shankar, in “Challenges of Planning for Heritage Areas in Panaji City (Jan Feb 2012)”, p. 549
  • Episodic flooding in Panaji even during low tides is directly linked to rapid urbanization and consequent damage to existing drainage systems.
    • Nandkumar M Kamat, in “Planning for Panaji-Myths and Truth-V (27 October 2013)”
  • Panaji is to be developed as a city that is environmentally and economically sustainable, a city that is a mixture of heritage and modernity, a city that cares for its citizen, a city that cares for its tourist, a city that maintains it culture, a city that provide high quality infrastructure services and facilities, a well managed clean, green and safe city that provides and better present and bright future to its people.

Architectural Monuments[edit]

The city’s architecture is the surest sign that Goa evolved independently of the rest of India...
Statue of Aba de Faria...the strange and compelling statue of man bearing down upon a supine female form...
  • The city’s architecture is the surest sign that Goa evolved independently of the rest of India. In the small old quarters of Fontainhas and Sao Tomé, winding alleyways are lined with Portuguese-style houses, boasting distinctive red-tiled roofs, wooden window shutters and rickety balconies decorated with bright pots of petunias.
  • Secretariat building dating from the sixteenth century, colonial era building originally the palace of the original ruler Adil Shah, which was the Viceroy’s official residence in 1759, now houses less exciting government offices.
    • Amy Karafin, Anirban Mahapatra, in South India, p. 194
  • Chapel of Saint Sebastian, has crucifix first brought to Panaji in 1812 from Old Goa after the Inquisition was suppressed. It is considered an unusual piece since Christ’s eyes are open – rather than shut as is customary - and legend has it that this was done to instill fear in the hearts of those being brought before the dreaded Inquisitors.
    • Amy Karafin, Anirban Mahapatra, in “South India”, p. 195
  • ...the strange and compelling statue of man bearing down upon a supine female form depcits one of Goa’s most famous home grown talents, Abbe Faria, an eighteenth century Goan priest, father of ‘hypnotism’ and friend of Napolean in full melodramatic throes.
    • Amy Karafin, Anirban Mahapatra, in “South India”, p. 194
  • With a madcap carnival during Lent, a growing number of ‘lifestyle’ stores catering to the well heeled traveler, and a friendly, easy going river side vibe, it is great place for explorations of Goa’s historic hinterland or simply a day trip back from the beach.
    • Sarina Singh, in “Lonely Planet India (15 September 2010)”, p. 864

External links[edit]

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