Paul Craig Roberts

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Paul Craig Roberts (born April 3, 1939) is an economist and a nationally syndicated columnist for Creators Syndicate. He served as an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury in the Reagan Administration. He is a former editor and columnist for the Wall Street Journal, Business Week and Scripps Howard News Service.

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  • When America's creditors consider our behavior they see total fiscal irresponsibility. They see a deluded country that acts as if it is a privilege for foreigners to lend to it, and a deluded country that believes that foreigners will continue to accumulate US debt until the end of time.

    The fact of the matter is that the US is bankrupt.

  • The US owes the world. The US "superpower" cannot even finance its own domestic operations, much less its gratuitous wars except via the kindness of foreigners to lend it money that cannot be repaid.

    The US will never repay the loans. The American economy has been devastated by offshoring, by foreign competition, and by the importation of foreigners on work visas, while it holds to a free trade ideology that benefits corporate fat cats and shareholders at the expense of American labor. The dollar is failing in its role as reserve currency and will soon be abandoned.

    When the dollar ceases to be the reserve currency, the US will no longer be able to pay its bills by borrowing more from foreigners.

    • "A Bankrupt Superpower," CounterPunch (2008-03-18)
  • The US is not a superpower. The US is a financially dependent country that foreign lenders can close down at will.

    Washington still hasn’t learned this. American hubris can lead the administration and Congress into a bailout solution that the rest of the world, which has to finance it, might not accept.

  • If we add state capitalism to the Bush administration’s success in eroding both the US Constitution and the power of Congress, we may be witnessing the final death of accountable constitutional government.
    • "The Bitter Fruits of Deregulation," CounterPunch (2008-09-24)

External links[edit]

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