Raimondo Montecuccoli

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Count Raimondo Montecúccoli

Raimondo, Count of Montecúccoli or Montecucculi (21 February 1608 or 160916 October 1680) was an Italian military general who also served as general for the Austrians, and was also a prince of the Holy Roman Empire and Neapolitan Duke of Melfi.

Sourced[edit]

Memorie (Ed. Colonia, 1704)[edit]

  • Chi può viver senza mangiare, esca in campagna senza le vittovaglie necessarie.
    • P. 51.
    • Translation: He who can live without eating may safely embark on a campaign without the necessary commissariat.
    • Translation reported in Harbottle's Dictionary of quotations French and Italian (1904), p. 270.
  • Qual meraviglia . . . richiesto tal uno delle cose necessarie alia guerra, egli rispondesse, tre esser quelle : Danaro, danaro, danaro!
    • P. 54.
    • Translation: What wonder that a certain person, being asked what were the things necessary for war, should reply that there were three, to wit, money, money and money.
    • Translation reported in Harbottle's Dictionary of quotations French and Italian (1904), p. 309.
  • Nissuno stato pubblico può godersi la quieta, nè ribattere l’injurie, nè diffendere le leggi, la religione e la libertà senza arme.
    • P. 55.
    • Translation: No State can enjoy tranquillity, nor repel hostile attacks, nor defend its laws, its religion and its liberty, unless it be armed.
    • Translation reported in Harbottle's Dictionary of quotations French and Italian (1904), p. 370.
  • Trattar le cose con molti, risolverle con pochi, o da se solo.
    • P. 83.
    • Translation: Discuss your plans with many, decide on them with few, or by yourself.
    • Translation reported in Harbottle's Dictionary of quotations French and Italian (1904), p. 428.
  • L’arte che imita la natura, opera per gradi, e non a salti.
    • P. 344.
    • Translation: Art, which imitates nature, works by steps, and not by leaps.
    • Translation reported in Harbottle's Dictionary of quotations French and Italian (1904), p. 333.
  • È la lancia la regina dell’ armi a cavallo.
    • P. 364.
    • Translation: The lance is the queen of cavalry weapons.
    • Translation reported in Harbottle's Dictionary of quotations French and Italian (1904), p. 293.
  • L’ozio è somite del vizio, e della virtute negozio.
    • P. 387.
    • Translation: Sloth is the pinnacle of vice, and of virtue, activity.
    • Translation reported in Harbottle's Dictionary of quotations French and Italian (1904), p. 337.

External links[edit]

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