Results

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Results are the final consequences of a sequence of actions or events expressed qualitatively or quantitatively. Possible results include advantage, disadvantage, gain, injury, loss, value and victory. There may be a range of possible outcomes associated with an event depending on the point of view, historical distance or relevance. Reaching no result can mean that actions are inefficient, ineffective, meaningless or flawed.

CONTENT: A-D, E-H, I-L, M-P, Q-T, U-Z, See also, External links

Quotes[edit]

Quotes arranged alphabetical by author

A-D[edit]

  • Quando aliquid prohibetur, prohibetur et omne per quod devenitur ad illud.
    • Translation: When anything is forbidden, everything which leads to the same result is also forbidden.
    • Author unknown; reported by Junius as a Latin legal maxim in The letters of Junius: Stat Nominis Umbra (1801), p. 444. Translation reported in Sir William Gurney Benham, A Book of Quotations, Proverbs and Household Words (1907), p. 647.
  • From hence, let fierce contending nations know,
    What dire effects from civil discord flow.
  • As you sow y' are like to reap.
  • The thorns which I have reap'd are of the tree
    I planted—they have torn me—and I bleed!
    I should have known what fruit would spring from such a seed.
  • Tantas veces va el cantarillo à la fuente.
    • The pitcher goes so often to the fountain (that it gets broken).
    • Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote, I. 30. Tant va li poz au puis qu'il brise. Quoted by Gautier de Coinci. Early 13th century. in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 670.
  • Al freir de los huevos lo vera.
    • It will be seen in the frying of the eggs.
    • Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote, 1. 37. in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 670.
  • Ut sementem feceris, ita metes.
    • As thou sowest, so shalt thou reap.
    • Cicero, De Oratore, II. 65. in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 670.
  • O! lady, we receive but what we give,
    And in our life alone doth nature live;
    Ours is her wedding-garment, ours her shroud!
  • It is the common fate of the indolent to see their rights become a prey to the active. The condition upon which God hath given liberty to man is eternal vigilance, which condition if he break, servitude is at once the consequence of his crime, and the punishment of his guilt.
    • John Philpot Curran, "Speech Upon the Right of Election" (1790), published in Thomas Osborne Davis, ed., The Speeches of the Right Honorable John Philpot Curran (1871), p. 105.
  • From little spark may burst a mighty flame.
    • Dante Alighieri, Paradise, Canto I, line 34. in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 670.

E-H[edit]

  • Consequences are unpitying. Our deeds carry their terrible consequences, quite apart from any fluctuations that went before—consequences that are hardly ever confined to ourselves.
    • George Eliot, Adam Bede, Chapter XVI. in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 670.
  • A bad ending follows a bad beginning.
    • Euripides, Frag. Melanip. (Stobœus.), in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 670.
  • So comes a reck'ning when the banquet's o'er,
    The dreadful reck'ning, and men smile no more.
    • John Gay, What D'ye Call't? Act II, scene 4. in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 670.
  • That from small fires comes oft no small mishap.
    • George Herbert, The Temple, Artillierie. in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 670.
  • They have sown the wind, and they shall reap the whirlwind.
    • Hosea, VIII. 7. in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 670.
  • As to the logical consequences of this conviction of mine, I may be permitted to remark that logical consequences are the scarecrows of fools and the beacons of wise men.
    • Thomas Henry Huxley, On the Hypothesis that Animals Are Automata; published in The Fortnightly Review (November 1, 1874), Number XCV, p. 577.

I-L[edit]

  • All this is not the result of accident. It has a philosophical cause. Without the Constitution and the Union, we could not have attained the result; but even these, are not the primary cause of our great prosperity.
    • Abraham Lincoln Fragment on the Constitution and the Union (c. January, 1861); quoted in Roy P. Basler, ed., The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4 (New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1953), p. 168-169.

M-P[edit]

  • By their fruits ye shall know them.
    • Matthew, VII. 20. in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 670.
  • What dire offence from am'rous causes springs,
    What mighty contests rise from trivial things.
    • Alexander Pope, The Rape of the Lock (1712), Canto I. "Contests" is "quarrels" in first ed. Same idea in Erasmus, Adagia. Claudianus, In Rufinum, II. 49.
  • Whoso diggeth a pit shall fall therein.
    • Proverbs, XXVI. 27. in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 670.

Q-T[edit]

  • If a man will make a purchase of a chance, he must abide by the consequences.
  • Contentions fierce,
    Ardent, and dire, spring from no petty cause.
    • Walter Scott, Peveril of the Peak, Chapter XL. in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 670.
  • Is not this a lamentable thing, that of the skin of an innocent lamb should be made parchment? that parchment, being scribbled o'er, should undo a man?
  • Every unpunished delinquency has a family of delinquencies.
    • Herbert Spencer, Sociology. in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 670.

U-Z[edit]

  • The evening shows the day, and death crowns life.
    • John Webster, A Monumental Column, last line. in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 670.
  • The Fates are just: they give us but our own;
    Nemesis ripens what our hands have sown.
  • The blood will follow where the knife is driven,
    The flesh will quiver where the pincers tear.
    • Edward Young, The Revenge, Act V. in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 670.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

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