Slovenian proverbs

From Wikiquote
Jump to: navigation, search

Slovenian proverbs are short expressions of popular wisdom from Slovenia and other parts of the world where Slovenian is spoken.

D[edit]

  • Dober pocitek je pol dela.
    • English equivalent: Well begun, is half done.
    • "Starting properly ensures the speedy completion of a process. A – beginning is often blocked by one or more obstacles (potential barriers) the removal of which may ensure the smooth course of the process."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 228. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Dvema gospodarjema ne moreš služiti.
    • English equivalent: Nobody can serve two masters.
    • "One cannot serve two conflicting causes simultaneously. If this is attempted neither will be served properly."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 283. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

K[edit]

  • Kdor ne dela, je brez jela.
    • English equivalent: He that will not work, shall not eat.
    • "Without due effort one is not entitled to the fruits of the work."
    • Source for proverb and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 256. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

J[edit]

  • kmar mlade ne vedó, jim stare provedó.
    • English equivalent: As the old cock crows, so crows the young.
    • "Children generally follow the example of their parents, but imitate their faults more surely than their virtues."
    • Proverbs of All Nations. W. Kent & Company (late D. Bogue). 1859. p. 27. 
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 138. ISBN 0415160502. 

K[edit]

  • Kakršna mati, taka hči.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • "Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily."
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Kakršen oče, tak sin.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • "Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 170. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Kamna, ki se obrača, se ne prime mah.
    • English equivalent: A rolling stone gathers no moss.
    • "There are a Set of People that before they are well fettled in one Habitation, dip into another so that they never arrive at a way of living."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Divers Proverbs, Nathan Bailey, 1721 [1]
    • Source for proverbs and meaning:Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "14". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 100. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Kdor drugemu jamo koplje sam vanjo pade.
    • English equivalent: Who digs a trap for others ends up in it himself.
    • Pogačnik, Faganel (2000). Zbornik o Janezu Svetokriškem: prispevki s simpozija v Vipavskem Križu, 22.-24. aprila 1999. Slovenska akademija znanosti in umetnosti. p. 344. ISBN 1. 
  • Kdor prej pride prej melje.
    • English equivalent: First come, first served.
    • "Those who arrive or apply earliest are most likely to get what they want from a limited supply of things, such as tickets, discounted goods or refreshments."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 88. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Ljubljanski zvon. Knjigarna Tiskovne Zadruge R.Z.Z.O.Z.. 1929. p. 30. 
  • Kdor redko sejé, bo redko žel.
    • English equivalent: What you reap is what you sow.
    • Strauss (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 394. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Krava pri gobcu molze.
    • Translation: The cow is milked at the muzzle.
    • English equivalent: It's by the head that the cow gives the milk.
    • "It is not enough to be hard working; so are the ants. What are you hard working about?"
    • Henry David Thoreau, letter to Harrison Blake (16 November 1857).
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1039. ISBN 0415096243. 

L[edit]

  • Lepa beseda lepo mesto najde.
    • English equivalent: Politeness costs little and yields much.
    • Chapman (1999). Pet jezikov ljubezni. Tuma. p. 48. 
  • Laž ima kratke noge.
    • English equivalent: A lie has short legs.
    • Herbaj, Lapornik, Savkovič, Balmazovič, (Celje). (2002). Lažima kratke noge. Osnovna šola Hudinja. 

M[edit]

  • Molk je znak priznanja.
    • English equivalent: Silence gives consent.
    • "Those who do not reply to a request or accusation, or who raise no objection to something said or done, are assumed to have acquiesced."
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 244. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "94". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 430. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

N[edit]

  • Ni treba prilivati olja v ogenj.
    • English equivalent: Don't add fuel to the fire.
    • "We should not make a bad situation even worse by an improper remark."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 338. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

O[edit]

  • Otro, norci in pijanci govore resnico.
    • English equivalent: Children, fools and drunken men tell the truth.
    • "Children and fools have no inhibition, and alcohol consumed removes the inhibition against telling the truth that occasionally one would like to keep secret."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 272. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

P[edit]

  • Prijatelja spoznaš v nesreĉi.
    • English equivalent: A friend is known in adversity, like gold is known in fire.
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 159. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

V[edit]

  • Več glav več ve.
    • English equivalent: Many eyes see more than one.
    • "More people know more than one does. The information of several people exceeds that of one, so listening to the advice of others may prove advantageous."
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "8". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 72. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Kovač, Hribar (2005). Večglav večve: informacijski kažipot. Knjižnica Jožeta Udoviča. 
  • Velike ribe male žro.
    • English equivalent: Men are like fish; the great ones devour the small.
    • "Small organizations or insignificant people tend to be swallowed up or destroyed by those that are greater and more powerful."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 1 July 2013. 
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 420. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Vsak je svoje sreče kovač.
    • English equivalent: Every man is the smith of his own fortune.
    • "In shaping one's own fortune one should not rely on the help of others, as they are also concerned mainly about their own matters."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 388. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Vsaka jabolka padejo blizu stebla.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • "Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

Z[edit]

  • Z enim udarcem ne podreš hrasta.
    • English equivalent: Little strokes fell great oaks.
    • "A difficult task, e. g. removing a person/group from a strong position, or changing established ideas cannot be done quickly. It can be achieved gradually, by small steps, a little at a time."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 252. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.