Talk:Arthur Cecil Pigou

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I would agree with bolding to pick out a particularly famous phrase in a long passage. Otherwise, I find it is just confusing by giving the impression that some parts of the quote are more important than others when this is not the case.--Ole.Holm 20:56, 4 November 2009 (UTC)

In these quotes which I added or extended I bolded the portions that seemed to be most notable expressions of ideas, but included the other parts for context.
The only quote on this page originally was an unsourced quote:
The error of optimism dies in the crisis, but in dying it gives birth to an error of pessimism. This new error is born, not an infant, but a giant.
To prevent its likely nomination for deletion, I sourced it and extended this to :
Prosperity ends in a crisis. The error of optimism dies in the crisis, but in dying it gives birth to an error of pessimism. This new error is born, not an infant, but a giant; for an industrial boom has necessarily been a period of strong emotional excitement, and an excited man passes from one form of excitement to another more rapidly than he passes to quiescence. Under the new error, business is unduly depressed.
I bolded the first portion as the most significant and noted part of that statement, as one that seems widely quoted, and added a few others, in which I perceived there to be several notable statements, amidst others less impressive but which provided valuable context. I might well have only added the bolded portions of these quotes, but much prefer to give so much context as seems adequate for proper reference to the general subjects discussed. From the earliest days of wikiquote I have promoted bolding of such passages as are most quoted or seem most notable, as I particularly dislike large tracts of undifferentiated text in a quote compendium. ~ Kalki 22:51, 4 November 2009 (UTC)