Theatre

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Theatre (Greek "theatron"), enjoys the distinction of two spellings: in British English, "theatre" and in American English, "theater". There is no technical distinction between the meanings of the two spellings, however most theatre artists prefer the English spelling because it creates a historical nod to the ancient Greek term theatron. Some also use the American spelling to designate a theatre building and the English term to reference the art itself, as in the "art of theatre." Theatre is that branch of the performing arts concerned with the creation of stories or narratives for (or with) an audience using combinations of acting, speech, gesture, music, dance, object manipulation, sound and spectacle — indeed, any one or more elements of the other performing arts. In addition to standard narrative dialogue style, theatre takes such forms as opera, musicals, ballet, mime, kabuki, classical Indian dance, Chinese opera, mummers' plays, and pantomime.

Sourced[edit]

  • By increasing the size of the keyhole, today's playwrights are in danger of doing away with the door.
    • Peter Ustinov, Christian Science Monitor, (1962) - reported in Colin Jarman (1993). The Book of Poisonous Quotes. McGraw-Hill Professional, p. 104. ISBN 0809236818.
  • The theatre is a place where one has time for the problems of people to whom one would show the door if they came to one's office for a job.
    • Quoted in "Tennessee Williams" in Profiles (1990) by Kenneth Tynan (first published as a magazine article in February 1956)

Attributed[edit]

  • A play is fiction - and fiction is fact distilled into truth.
    • Edward Albee, reported in James Beasley Simpson (1998). Simpson's contemporary quotations: The Most Notable Quotes Since 1950. Houghton Mifflin, p. 398. ISBN 0395430852.
  • If you want to help the American theater, don't be an actress, be an audience.
  • If you have a message, call western union.
    • The earliest known print attribution is to Moss Hart in Van Wert (Ohio) Times Bulletin (26 August 1954) as cited in Fred Shapiro, The Yale Book of Quotations (2006). Widely attributed to Samuel Goldwyn, but denied by his biographer, A. Scott Berg, in Goldwyn: A Biography (1998).
  • The theater is a great equalizer: it is the only place where the poor can look down on the rich.
  • A playwright is a lay preacher peddling the ideas of his time in popular form.
  • Acting is merely the art of keeping a large number of people from coughing.
    • Ralph Richardson, reported in Ashton Applewhite; Tripp Evans, Andrew Frothingham (2003). And I Quote: The Definitive Collection of Quotes, Sayings, and Jokes for the Contemporary Speechmaker. Macmillan, p. 283. ISBN 0312307446.
  • Know your lines and don't bump into the furniture.
    • Spencer Tracy, reported in Ashton Applewhite; Tripp Evans, Andrew Frothingham (2003). And I Quote: The Definitive Collection of Quotes, Sayings, and Jokes for the Contemporary Speechmaker. Macmillan, p. 283. ISBN 0312307446.

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