Thomas Fuller (writer)

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Always tell the Truth: where it is not loved, it is respected and feared.
For the earlier author of The Worthies of England, see Thomas Fuller

Thomas Fuller (24 June 165417 September 1734) was an English physician, writer and adage collector.

Introductio ad prudentiam: Part II (1727)[edit]

  • Good Reader, I suspect I may have written some Things twice ; if not the same in Words, yet in Sense, which I desire you to pass by favourably ; forasmuch as you may well think, it was as difficult and dull a Thing for me, in so great a Number of independent Sentences, to find out the Repetitions, as it would be in a vast Heap of different Coins and Medals, confusedly thrown together, to pick out here and there one that bore the same and like Inscription, with some other among them. Besides the Pains, such a Search would cost me more Time, than I can afford it ; for my Glass of Life running now low, I must not suffer one Sand to fall in waste, nor spend one Minute in picking of Straws. And moreover, my aged Eyes being grown weak and dim, I fear they will become quite dark, by much perusing and poring ; or at least so far, so as to render me unable to perfect several Papers now lying by me, which I would willingly make a Present of to you.
    • Excerpt from Introductio ad prudentiam: Part II, To the Reader (Prefatory Remarks)
  • 1772. Let thy Vices die before thee.
  • 1800. Make not a Jest of another Man's Infirmity. Remember thy own.
  • 1814. Always tell the Truth : where it is not loved, it is respected and feared.
  • 1817. Keep thy eyes wide open before Marriage ; and half shut afterward.
  • 1887. Think thyself happy if thou hast one true Friend ; never think of finding another.
  • 1943. If thou canst not find Tranquility in thyself ; 'twill be to little Purpose to seek it anywhere else.
  • 1953. Learn the art of Silence ; the wise Man that holds his Tongue, says more than the Fool who speaks.
  • 1964. If thou wilt have no Difference with thy Friends ; sell them not Horses, nor Goods ; and buy nothing of them.
  • 1978. If thou art wise, thou knowest thy own Ignorance ; and thou art ignorant if thou knowest not thy self.
  • 2001. Find out thy own Mistakes, and Failings, in order to amend them. A Disease known is half cured.
  • 2021. Avoid knowing more than thou needest : Secrets are troublesome Burthens to such as are not interested in them.
  • 2023. Assist the afflicted with something real, if thou canst ; As for Tears they are but Water, what good can they do?
  • 2043. He that advised thee not to let the Sun set in thine anger, did not command thee to trust a deceiving Enemy next Morning.
  • 2048. Report not an ill Thing that thou thy self knowest not, but by the Report of a Man, who may lie or aggravate the Matter.
  • 2057. Drive away and never endure Tale-bearers : Whoever entertains thee with the Faults of others, designs to serve thee in the same Kind.
  • 2168. 'Tis better for thee to be wise and not seem so, than to seem wise and not be so : Yet Men, for the most Part, desire and endeavor the contrary.
  • 2320. Trust not an Enemy, because thou hast done him good Offices : for Men are naturally more prone to revenge Injuries, than to requite Kindnesses.
  • 2325. Squander not away thy life in Pastimes : There’s but little need to drive away Time, which is ever flying away so swiftly of itself ; and when once gone is gone for ever.
  • 2330. Live not to thyself alone ; but have it in Mind, that we are all Members of one Body : and it is as natural to help one another, as for the Hands to help the Feet ; and the Eyes the Hands.
  • 2446. The Word Friend is a common Name, and appropriated by most People ; but believe me, thou wilt scarce ever find a Man that gives solid Proof of a true, unfeigned, and uninterested Friendship.
  • 2454. If any one giveth thee excessive Praises more than can handsomely belong to thee, thou art to think of him, that he taketh thee for vain and credulous, and easy to be deceived, and effectually a Fool.
  • 2462. Thou canst scarcely be truly wise till thou hast been deceived. Thy own Errors will teach thee more Prudence, than the grave Precepts, and even Examples of others.
  • 2463. If thou canst but live free from Debt and Want, 'tis not absolutely necessary to care for more : for all the rest, truly speaking, is but Vanity, and for the most part Vexation too.
  • 2489. Thou art not Master of what thou hast spoken, but mayest dispose of what thou hast not spoken as thou pleasest, and canst say it, or not say it, as thou wilt.
  • 2545. Never defame or accuse any, except thou beest sure and certain of the Fact, and canst speak home to the Purpose : for undoubtful Accusations leave a Stain behind them ; and after prove indelible Injuries to the party accused.
  • 2555. When thou shewest Respect to any one, see that thy Submissions be proportionable to the Homage thou owest him. There is Stupidity and Pride in doing too little ; but in over acting of it, there is Abjection and Hypocrisy.
  • 2579. If thou findest thou canst not suffer the Impertinencies, Follies, and ill Usages of the World, withdraw from it ; but first be sure thou canst bear with thyself.
  • 2591. If I leave thee a moderate Fortune, as my Father left me, and thou provest wise and virtuous, it will be sufficient. It's none of the least of God's Favours, that Wealth comes not trolling in upon us ; for many of us should have been worse, if our Estates had been better.
    • These precepts were first collected as advice for Fuller's son John.
    • Compare Poor Richard's Almanack (1751) : Many a Man would have been worse, if his Estate had been better.
  • 2593. A prudent and discreet Silence will be sometimes more to thy Advantage, than the most witty expression, or even the best contrived Sincerity. A Man often repents that he has spoken, but seldom that he has held his Tongue.
  • 2597. Keep thy Judgment to thyself. Why should others know what thou art? or paraphrase upon thy Opinion? Herein thou hast the Advantage of changing thy Mind when thou art mistaken, and yet continue ( for ought others know ) in the same Mind.
  • 2609. Never think that the Things thou wantest will cure thee of thy Discontents ; for they will enlarge thy Desires, and make the Wounds wider. The Way to think we have enough, is not to desire to have too much.
  • 2683. Have a Care of him that is slow to anger, for like as green Wood which is long in kindling, continueth hot longer than the dry, if it have once taken Fire : So that Man, who is not easily moved is more hard to be pacify'd, than he that is quickly provoked.
  • 2732. Thou knowest not thy own Strength for want of trying it, and upon that Account thinkest thyself really unable to do many Things which Experience would convince thee, thou hast more Ability to effect, than thou hast Will to attempt.
  • 2742. Shew not thyself joyful and pleased at the Misfortunes of any Man, tho' thou hatest him ; It argues a mischevious Mind, and that thou hadst a Desire to have done it thyself, if thou hadst had Power or Opportunity to thy Will.
  • 2762. In Matters of Slander, thou oughtest to suspend thy Judgment, and examine the Thing ; and not, as the common Custom is, persuade thyself, that common Report is sufficient warrant for the Truth of the Matters. Popular Opinion is the greatest Lie in the World.
  • 2763. Avoid Men that are Hot and Quarrelsome ; they will affront thee for nothing, and urge Things beyond Reason and Measure. They will bring thee into Troubles, which thou wilt not easily get out of. Keeping Company with such is living with Wolves, Bears, and Tygers.
  • 2826. Provoke not even a patient Man too far ; extreme Sufferance when it comes to dissolve, breaks out into the most severe Revenge ; for taking Fire at last, Anger and Fury being combined into one, discharge their utmost Force at the first Blast. Irarumque omnes effundit habenas.
    • Latin fragment from Vergil's Aeneid, Book XII, line 499 : ‘He threw away all restraint on his anger.’
  • 2858. By Trifles and unheeded common Things of Life, thou may'st discover Mens Qualities, Tempers, and Inclinations, better than by their greater Actions : Because in Matters of Importance they strain themselves, but in lesser Things they heedlessly follow the Current of their own Natures.
  • 2915. Suffer a Friend to reprove thee, and thank him heartily for it : 'Tis a Happiness for a Man that he can be reproved when he does amiss, and be recalled when he runs wrong. Princes are deprived of that Benefit : for they converse familiarly but with very few Persons, and those make it their only Business to humour them.
  • 2986. See that thou be alway a doing of something, and be ever ashamed to catch thyself idle : The idle man is content to anticipate Death, by being out of Motion ; but high Souls, like the Heaven they come from, move continually, and are uncapable of Rest, until they rest there.
  • 3036. As he that doth not eat when he should, may have no Stomach when he is weak, but presently vomits up his Food again ; so if thou studiest not the Art of Patience, and preparest not thy mind before-hand, and takest not in Grounds of Consolation, till thou art in Troubles, and hast need of great Comfort, thou wilt find thy Soul very impatient of Remedies, and 'twill be irksome to thee but even to read such Things as should quiet thee.
  • 3064. Be not always hot, and hasty in managing thy Affairs. Prudent Pauses forward Business : There is sometimes more Skill shewed by a Physician in not Prescribing, than in Prescribing. And there is no better Remedy for some Diseases, than to let them alone : for unseasonable meddling with them, may hinder their proceeding to a Crisis, and at long Run they will mend of themselves.
  • 3072. Thou may'st extract an Antidote out of a Viper, and Good out of an Enemy. An Enemy will tell thee more truly of thy Imperfections, than the best of Friends will adventure to do, or ourselves (being partial to ourselves)will be able to discern : And this may be apply'd as precious Balm, to heal the Wounds our Folly, or Oversight have given our Reputation, by guarding our Actions for the future. And this is far better, than to be flattered into Pride, and Carelessness.
  • 3082. To what Purpose shouldest thou seek great Things for thyself in the World? or having obtained them, prize them at any considerable Rate? or value thyself upon them? seeing thou knowest not, but this Night thy Soul may be required of thee, when thou shalt be divested of them all. 'Twould be as vain and unreasonable, as for a Traveler, that is to stay at his Inn but for a night, to take great Thought and Pains about furnishing and adorning his Chamber, which the next Morning he must leave to the next Comer.
  • 3135. Every one is for denying, extenuating, or throwing the Blame on others, and never will confess a Fault, and take it upon himself ; but this, instead of getting it excused and pardoned aggravates it, and makes it worse, and angers the Party concerned, and so it doth Mischief instead of Good. I advise therefore (unless it be a furious, unforgiving Person, and the Thing be a Crime that must not be owned) frankly to own it, to shew how thou wast brought into it, and wish thou hadst not done it. It's likely this ingenuous dealing and throwing thyself upon his Kindness, may work upon his good Nature, and so the storm may pass off without more Mischief ; but this must be managed artfully in a middle Way between Sneaking and Arrogancy.

Gnomologia (1732)[edit]

  • All of us forget more than we remember, and therefore it hath been my constant Custom to note down and record whatever I thought of myself, or receiv'd from Men, or Books worth preserving. Among other things, I wrote out Apothegms, Maxims, Proverbs, acute Expressions, vulgar Sayings, &c. And having at length collected more than ever any Englishman has before me, I have ventur'd to send them forth, to try their Fortune among the People.
    • Excerpt from Gnomologia, To the Reader (Prefatory Remarks)
  • 62. A Crowd is not Company.
  • 92. A Father is a Treasure, a Brother a Comfort ; but a Friend is both.
  • 98. A Fool and his Money are soon parted.
  • 108. A Fool’s Tongue is long enough to cut his own Throat.
  • 120. A Friend to all, is a Friend to none.
  • 146. A good Example is the best Sermon.
  • 172. A good Reputation is a fair Estate.
  • 241. A light Purse makes a heavy Heart.
  • 270. A Man among Children will be long a Child, a Child among Men will be soon a Man.
  • 271. A Man apt to promise, is apt to forget.
  • 283. A Man in Passion rides a Horse that runs away with him.
  • 284. A Man knows his Companion in a long Journey and a little Inn.
  • 294. A Man may lead his Horse to Water, but cannot make him drink.
  • 300. A Man may say too much even upon the best of Subjects.
  • 310. A Man surprized is half beaten.
  • 331. A Mouse in Time may shear a Cable asunder.
  • 342. A Penny sav'd is Two-pence got.
  • 350. A Pin a Day is a Groat a Year.
  • 407. A small Leak will sink a great Ship.
  • 504. All between the Cradle and the Coffin is uncertain.
  • 507. All Cats are alike grey in the Night.
  • 509. All complain of want of Memory, but none of want of Judgment.
  • 539. All Men think their Enemies ill Men.
  • 542. All Saint without, all Devil within.
  • 547. All Temptations are founded either in Hope or Fear.
  • 560. All things are difficult, before they are easy.
  • 569. All Women are good ; viz. good for something, or good for nothing.
  • 598. An empty Sack cannot stand upright.
  • 613. An Hour may destroy what an Age was a building.
  • 620. An idle Person is the Devil's Playfellow.
  • 639. An Oak is not fell'd at one Chop.
  • 673. As demure as if Butter would not melt in his Mouth.
  • 685. As good eat the Devil as the Broth he's boil'd in.
  • 733. As the best Wine makes the sharpest Vinegar, so the deepest Love turns to the deadliest Hatred.
  • 743. As Virtue is its own Reward, so Vice is its own Punishment.
  • 754. Absence cools moderate Passions, but inflames violent ones.
  • 757. Abused Patience turns to Fury.
  • 803. Antiquity cannot privilege an Error, nor Novelty prejudice a Truth.
  • 804. Antiquity is not always a Mark of Verity.
  • 812. Argument seldom convinces any one contrary to his Inclinations.
  • 830. Bacchus hath drown'd more Men than Neptune.
  • 840. Barefoot must not go among Thorns.
  • 849. Be as you would seem to be.
  • 860. Better abridge petty Charges, than stoop to petty Gettings.
    • Compare Poor Richard's Almanack (1738) : 'Tis less discredit to abridge petty charges, than to stoop to petty Gettings.
  • 872. Better be alone than in bad Company.
  • 892. Better eat Salt with Philosophers of Greece, than eat Sugar with Courtezans of Italy.
    • Compare Poor Richard's Almanack (1740) : Thou hadst better eat salt with the Philosophers of Greece, than sugar with the Courtiers of Italy.
  • 903. Better have an old Man to humour, than a young Rake to break your Heart.
  • 911. Better late than never.
  • 950. Beauty is but Skin deep ; within is Filth and Putrefaction.
  • 959. Bees that have Honey in their Mouths, have Stings in their Tails.
  • 961. Beggars and Borrowers must be no Chusers.
  • 977. Beware of no Man more than thy self.
  • 1006. Boldness in Business is the first, second, and third thing.
  • 1048. Call your Husband Cuckold in Jest and he'll ne'er suspect you.
  • 1090. Cheat me in the Price, but not in the Goods.
  • 1092. Children and Fools tell Truth.
  • 1125. Command your Wealth, else that will command you.
  • 1131. Company in Misery makes it light.
  • 1134. Comparisons are odious.
  • 1154. Content is the Philosopher’s Stone, that turns all it touches into Gold.
    • Compare Poor Richard's Almanack (1758) : Content is the Philosopher’s Stone, that turns all it touches into Gold.
  • 1185. Count not your Chickens before they be hatch'd.
  • 1200. Craft must have Clothes ; but Truth loves to go naked.
  • 1223. Custom is the Guide of the Ignorant.
  • 1226. Custom without Reason, is but an ancient Error.
  • 1345. Drunkenness turns a Man out of himself, and leaves a Beast in his room.
  • 1370. Enough's as good as a Feast.
  • 1412. Every Cock is proud on his own Dunghill.
  • 1415. Every Dog has its Day ; and every Man his Hour.
  • 1486. Faint Heart ne'er won fair Lady.
  • 1536. Fine Cloaths wear soonest out of Fashion.
  • 1537. Fine Cloth is never out of Fashion.
  • 1544. Fish and Guests smell at three Days old.
  • 1577. Fools make Feasts, and wise Men eat them.
  • 1579. Fools may invent Fashions, that wise Men will wear.
    • Similarly in French: Les fous inventent les modes et les sages les suivent.
  • 1590. For Fashion's sake, as Dogs go to Church.
  • 1596. For want of a Nail the Shoe is lost ; for want of a Shoe the Horse is lost ; for want of a Horse the Man is lost.
    • Compare Poor Richard's Almanack (1752) : For Want of a Nail the Shoe is lost; for want of a Shoe, the Horse is Lost; for want of a Horse the Rider is lost. ; also Poor Richard's Almanack (1758) : For Want of a Nail the Shoe was lost; for want of a Shoe, the Horse was Lost; and for want of a Horse the Rider was lost, being overtaken and slain by the Enemy, all for want of Care about a Horse-shoe Nail.
  • 1597. For whom does the blind Man's Wife paint her self?
  • 1599. Fortune favours Fools.
  • 1657. Give him but Rope enough, and he'll hang himself.
  • 1659. Give not Pearls to the Hogs.
  • 1675. God help the Rich ; the Poor can beg.
  • 1688. God sends Meat, and the Devil sends Cooks.
    • Compare Poor Richard's Almanack (1735) : Bad Commentators spoil the best of books, So God sends meat (they say) the devil cooks.
  • 1752. Great and Good are seldom the same Man.
  • 1781. Half a Loaf is better than no Bread.
  • 1805. Hatred is blind, as well as Love.
  • 1936. He is not laughed at, that laughs at himself first.
  • 1961. He knows which Side of his Bread is butter'd.
  • 2018. He set my House afire, only to roast his Eggs.
  • 2033. He talks in the Bear-Garden Tongue.
  • 2084. He that does not speak Truth to me, does not believe me when I speak Truth.
  • 2085. He that does you a very ill Turn, will never forgive you.
  • 2144. He that has no Fools, Knaves nor Beggars in his Family, was begot by a Flash of Lightning.
  • 2155. He that hath a Head of Wax, must not walk in the Sun.
  • 2194. He that is too proud to ask, is too good to receive.
  • 2216. He that lies down with the Dogs, must rise with the fleas.
  • 2222. He that lives on Hope, has but a slender diet.
  • 2232. He that makes himself an Ass, must not take it ill, if Men ride him.
  • 2245. He that payeth beforehand, shall have his Work ill done.
  • 2248. He that plants Trees, loves others besides himself.
  • 2289. He that scattereth Thorns, must not go Barefoot.
  • 2308. He that spares the Bad, injures the Good.
  • 2350. He that will not be counselled, cannot be helped.
  • 2420. He wrongs not an old Man, who steals his Supper from him.
  • 2437. He's a Friend to none, that is a Friend to all.
  • 2445. He's a Slave, that cannot command himself.
  • 2523. Home is home, be it never so homely.
  • 2534. Honesty is the best Policy.
  • 2541. Hope is a good Breakfast, but a bad Supper.
  • 2542. Hope is as cheap as Despair.
  • 2569. Hunger is the best Sauce.
  • 2571. Hunger scarce kills any ; but Gluttony and Drunkenness, Multitudes.
  • 2580. Hypocrisy is a Sort of Homage, that Vice pays to Virtue.
  • 2592. I can't be your Friend, and your Flatterer too.
  • 2629. I took him for a Worm ; but he prov'd a Serpent.
  • 2649. I will not touch her with a Pair of Tongs.
  • 2666. If Afflictions refine some, they consume others.
  • 2707. If the Mountain will not come to Mahomet, Mahomet must go to the Mountain.
  • 2759. If you have no Enemies, it’s a sign Fortune has forgot you.
  • 2782. If you run after two Hares, you will catch neither.
  • 2788. If you sleep till Noon, you have no right to complain that the Days are short.
  • 2801. If you would know the value of a Ducat, try to borrow one.
  • 2863. It is a long Lane that never turns.
  • 2911. It is as natural to die, as to be born.
  • 2916. It is better to have a Hen to Morrow, than an Egg to Day.
  • 2942. It is good to have two Strings to one's Bow.
  • 2968. It is in vain to mislike the current Fashion.
  • 2982. It is my own Fault, if I am deceived by the same Man twice.
  • 2994. It is not a sign of Humility to declaim against Pride.
  • 3006. It is often easier to make new, than to cobble up the old.
  • 3017. It is sooner said than done.
  • 3031. It is Wit to pick a Lock, and steal a Horse ; but it is Wisdom to let it alone.
  • 3051. Jack of all Trades is of no Trade.
  • 3054. Idle Fellows are the Devil's Playfellows.
  • 3061. Idleness makes the Wit rust.
  • 3104. Insolence is Pride, with her Mask pulled off.
  • 3162. Learning makes a good Man better, and an ill Man worse.
  • 3168. Leave no Dirt, you’ll find no Dirt.
  • 3179. Let him fry in his own Grease.
  • 3214. Light-heel'd Mothers make leaden-heel'd Daughters.
  • 3263. Live, and let live.
  • 3270. Long life hath long Misery.
  • 3273. Look not a given Horse in the Mouth.
  • 3292. Love me, love my Dog.
  • 3299. Love thy Neighbor ; but cut not up thy Hedge for him.
  • 3306. Maidens should be seen, and not heard.
  • 3313. Make a Virtue of Necessity.
  • 3314. Make Hay, while the Sun shines.
  • 3325. Make the best of a bad Bargain.
  • 3330. Man begins to die before he is born.
  • 3340. Many can bear Adversity, but few Contempt.
  • 3347. Many Hands make light Work.
  • 3358. Many talk like Philosophers, and live like Fools.
  • 3362. Many Things fall out between the Cup and the Lip.
  • 3366. Many would be Cowards if they had Courage enough.
  • 3367. Many would have been worse, if their Estates had been better.
  • 3381. Measure thrice, and cut once.
  • 3387. Men apt to promise, are apt to forget.
  • 3389. Men are more prone to revengeInjuries, than to requite Kindnesses.
  • 3395. Men hate those they have hurt.
  • 3400. Men never think their Fortune too great, nor their Wit too little.
  • 3403. Men seek less to be instructed than applauded.
  • 3444. Money, like Dung, does no Good till ’tis spread.
  • 3454. More Flies are taken with a Drop of Honey than a Tun of Vinegar.
  • 3461. More than enough is too much.
  • 3515. Necessity dispenseth with Decorum.
  • 3523. Neither Fish, nor Flesh, nor good red Herring.
  • 3533. New Brooms sweep clean.
  • 3540. Nice Eaters seldom meet with a good Dinner.
  • 3570. No Fool like the old Fool.
  • 3623. No Resolutions of Repentance hereafter can be sincere.
  • 3628. No Smoak without some Fire.
  • 3655. None knows the Weight of another's Burthen.
  • 3657. None so deaf, as he that will not hear.
  • 3660. Nothing costs so much as what is given us.
  • 3668. Nothing is ill, that ends well.
  • 3671. Nothing is ours, but Time.
  • 3678. Nothing venture, nothing have.
  • 3685. Not to oversee Workmen, is to leave them your Purse open.
  • 3710. Old Custom, without Truth, is but an old Errour.
  • 3733. Once in Use, and ever after a Custom.
  • 3736. One barking Dog, sets all the Street a barking.
  • 3739. One Bird in the Hand, is worth two in the Bush.
  • 3758. One half of the World wonders how the other lives.
  • 3769. One may as much miss the Mark, by aiming too high, as too low.
  • 3779. One may say too much, even upon the best Subject.
  • 3834. Out of Sight ; out of Mind.
  • 3835. Out of the Frying-pan into the Fire.
  • 3859. Patience provok'd turns to Fury.
  • 3866. Penny-wise, and Pound-foolish.
  • 3881. Plants too often removed will not thrive.
    • Compare Poor Richard's Almanack (1737) : I never saw an oft-transplanted tree, nor yet an oft-removed family, that throve so well as those that settled be.
  • 3890. Point not at other's Spots with a foul Finger.
  • 3895. Poor men seek meat for their Stomach ; rich Men Stomach for their Meat.
    • Compare Poor Richard's Almanack (1735) : The poor man must walk to get meat for his stomach, the rich man to get a stomach to his meat.
  • 3902. Possession is eleven Points in the Law.
  • 3908. Poverty is not a Shame ; but the being asham'd of it, is.
  • 3918. Praise makes good Men better, and bad Men worse.
  • 3941. Pride is as loud a Beggar as Want ; and a great deal more saucy.
  • 3968. Proud Men can't bear with Pride in others.
  • 4002. Rashness is not Valour.
  • 4040. Riches abuse them, who know not how to use them.
  • 4057. Rolling Stones gather no Moss.
  • 4059. Rome was not built in a Day.
  • 4070. Sauce for a Goose, is Sauce for a Gander.
  • 4084. Search not a Wound too deep, lest thou make a new one.
  • 4106. Set a Thief to catch a Thief.
  • 4154. Short and Sweet.
  • 4163. Silent Men, like still Waters, are deep and dangerous.
  • 4165. Silence gives Consent.
  • 4192. Small Pitchers have wide Ears.
  • 4229. Soon ripe, soon rotten.
  • 4238. Spare the Rod, and spoil the Child.
  • 4243. Speak the Truth, and shame the Devil.
  • 4266. Strike, while the Iron is hot.
  • 4301. Tailors and Writers must mind the Fashion.
  • 4304. Take an Hair of the same Dog that bit you.
  • 4322. Teach your Grannum to suck Eggs.
  • 4368. That Patient is not like to recover, that makes the Doctor his Heir.
  • 4369. That penny's well spent, that saves a Groat.
  • 4374. That War only is just, which is necessary.
  • 4380. That which is one Man’s Meat, is another Man’s Poison.
  • 4384. That, which proves too much, proves nothing.
  • 4389. That, which you sow, you must reap.
  • 4436. The burnt Child dreads the Fire.
  • 4440. The Cart before the Horse.
  • 4490. The Drunkard continually assaults his own Life.
  • 4493. The Earth produces all Things, and receives all again.
  • 4495. The Ebb will fetch off, what the Tide brings in.
  • 4503. The eternal Talker neither hears nor learns.
  • 4517. The King's Cheese goes half away in Pareings.
    • Compare Poor Richard's Almanack (1735) : The King's cheese is half wasted in parings, but no matter, 'tis made of the people's milk.
  • 4522. The Fly, that playeth too long in the Candle, singeth her Wings at last.
  • 4537. The Fool is busy in everyone's Business but his own.
  • 4540. The Fool wanders, the wise Man travels.
  • 4545. The Fox may grow grey, but never good.
  • 4633. The longest Day must have an End.
  • 4649. The Memory of a Benefit soon vanisheth ; but the Remembrance of an Injury sticketh fast in the Heart.
  • 4655. The Moon is made of green Cheese.
  • 4657. The more Cooks, the worse Broth.
  • 4667. The more, the merrier ; the fewer, the better Cheer.
  • 4671. The most exquisite Folly is made of Wisdom too fine spun.
  • 4678. The Mountains have brought forth a Mouse.
  • 4693. The older a Fool is, the worse he is.
  • 4702. The Passions are like Fire and Water ; good Servants, but bad Masters.
  • 4706. The Pitcher, that goes often to the Well, comes home broken at last.
  • 4718. The present Fashion is always handsome.
  • 4723. The Proof of a Pudding is in the eating.
  • 4735. The Rich never want for Kindred.
  • 4749. The Sluggard makes his Night till Noon.
  • 4769. The Sting of a Reproach is the Truth of it.
  • 4776. The Sun is never the worse for shining on a Dunghill.
  • 4781. The sweetest Wine makes the sharpest Vinegar.
  • 4788. The Thief is sorry he is to be hanged, but not that he is a Thief.
  • 4795. The Tongue breaketh the Bone, tho' it hath none it self.
    • Compare Poor Richard's Almanack (1740) : Man's tongue is soft, and bone doth lack; Yet a stroke therewith may break a man's back.
  • 4797. The Tongue is not Steel, yet it cuts sorely.
  • 4823. The weakest go to the Wall.
  • 4833. The wise Man draws more Advantage from his Enemies, than a Fool from his Friends.
    • Compare Poor Richard's Almanack (1749) : The wise Man draws more Advantage from his Enemies, than the Fool from his Friends.
  • 4848. The worse the Passage, the more welcome the Port.
  • 4851. The worst Spoke in a Cart breaks first.
  • 4853. The Wrath of Brothers, is fierce and devilish.
  • 4858. There are more old Drunkards, than old Physicians.
  • 4864. There are no Coxcombs so troublesome, as those that have some Wit.
  • 4867. There cannot be a more intolerable Thing than a fortunate Fool.
  • 4872. There is a Bone for you to pick.
  • 4874. There is a deal of Difference between Love and Gratefulness.
  • 4889. There is but bad Choice , where the whole Stock is bad.
  • 4900. There is more pleasure in loving, than in being belov'd.
  • 4908. There is no disputing of Tastes, Appetites and Fancies.
  • 4912. There is no Man so bad, but has a secret Respect for the good.
  • 4915. There is no Piety in keeping an unjust Promise.
  • 4925. There is no usual Rule without an exception.
  • 4934. There is nothing more precious than Time, and nothing more prodigally wasted.
  • 4942. There must be two at least to a Quarrel.
  • 4948. They agree like Bells ; they want nothing but hanging.
  • 4970. They say so, is half a Lie.
  • 5000. This, or any Moment may be your last.
  • 5003. Tho' all Men were made of one Metal, yet they were not cast all in the same Mould.
  • 5014. Tho' the Sun shines, take your Cloak.
  • 5037. Three are too many to keep a Secret, and too few to be merry.
  • 5038. Three may keep Counsel, if two be away.
  • 5040. Thrift is the Philosopher's Stone.
  • 5049. Time and Tide tarry for no Man.
  • 5051. Time devours all things.
  • 5068. 'Tis better to suffer Wrong, than to do it.
  • 5085. 'Tis harder to unlearn than learn.
  • 5091. 'Tis Money, that begets Money.
  • 5115. 'Tis Self-Conceit, that makes Opinion obstinate.
  • 5118. 'Tis the early Bird, that catches the Worm.
  • 5120. 'Tis the last Feather, that breaks the Horse’s Back.
  • 5138. To believe a Business impossible, is the Way to make it so.
  • 5142. To cast Oyl into the Fire, is not the Way to quench it.
  • 5184. To him, that you tell your Secret, you resign your Liberty.
  • 5185. To hit the Nail on the Head.
  • 5187. To hold one's Nose to the Grind-stone.
  • 5188. To hold with the Hare, and run with the Hounds.
  • 5192. To kill two Birds with one Stone.
  • 5196. To leave no Stone unturn'd.
  • 5204. To make a Mountain of a Mole-hill.
  • 5210. To nourish a Viper in one's Bosom
  • 5214. To pay one in ones own Coin.
  • 5222. To run the Wild-Goose Chace.
  • 5225. To seek a Needle in a Bottle of Hay.
  • 5235. To strain at a Knat, and swallow a Camel.
  • 5241. To take from the right Hand, and give to the Left.
  • 5243. To talk without thinking is to shoot without aiming.
  • 5263. Too much Familiarity breeds Contempt.
  • 5272. Travel makes a wise Man better, but a Fool worse.
  • 5278. Troy was not took in a Day.
  • 5286. Trust him no further than you can throw him.
  • 5291. Trust thy self only, and another shall not betray thee.
  • 5305. Truth loves to go naked.
  • 5306. Truth makes the Devil blush.
  • 5324. Two Dogs fight for a Bone, and a third runs away with it.
  • 5335. Two things a Man should never be angry at ; what he can help, and what he cannot help.
  • 5344. Valour would fight, but Discretion would run away.
  • 5354. Vice is its own Punishment, and sometimes its own Cure.
  • 5371. Virtue hath such Charms, that even the Vicious inwardly reverence it.
  • 5414. Want of Care does us more Damage than want of Knowledge.
  • 5423. Waste makes Want.
  • 5426. We are apt to believe what we wish for.
  • 5430. We are more mindful of Injuries than Benefits.
  • 5442. We have all forgot more, than we remember.
  • 5451. We never know the Worth of Water, till the Well is dry.
  • 5454. We seldom find out that we are flattered.
  • 5465. Weeds are apt to grow faster than good Herbs.
  • 5466. Weeds want no sowing.
  • 5481. What cannot be alter'd, must be borne, not blam’d.
  • 5485. What costs little, is less esteemed.
  • 5499. What is the Use of Patience, if we cannot find it when we want it?
  • 5515. What's sowed in Youth, will be reaped in Age.
  • 5516. Whatsoever Time does, it undoes.
  • 5519. What the Eye sees not, the Heart rues not.
  • 5536. When a Man is set upon his own Ruin, 'tis in vain to reason with him.
  • 5542. When a Thing is done, Advice comes too late.
  • 5545. When all is gone, Repentance comes too late.
  • 5572. When the Cat's gone, the Mice grow sawcy.
  • 5689. While there is Life, there is Hope.
  • 5698. Who draws his Sword against his Prince, must throw away the Scabbard.
  • 5711. Who more busy than they that have least to do?
  • 5718. Who shall keep the Keepers?
  • 5733. Whosoever engages in many Pursuits, rarely suceeds in one.
  • 5738. Wickedness is its own Punishment, and many Times its own Cure.
  • 5744. Wine hath drowned more Men than the Sea.
  • 5749. Wine shews what a Man is.
  • 5779. Wise Men learn by other Men's Harms ; Fools, by their own.
  • 5798. With-hold not thy Money, where there is Need ; and waste it not, where there is none.
  • 5802. Wolves may lose their Teeth, but not their Nature.
  • 5810. Women’s Work is never done.
  • 5813. Words are but Wind ; but seeing is believing.
  • 5878. You cannot make Velvet out of a Sow's Ear.
  • 5881. You can't eat your Cake, and have it too.
  • 5930. You lay on your Butter, as with a Trowel.
  • 5949. You may know by a Handful the whole Sack.
  • 5967. You must not hope to reap Wheat, where you sow'd none.
  • 5968. You must plow with such Oxen as you have.
  • 5979. You pour Water into a Sieve.
  • 6001. You starve in a Cook's Shop.
  • 6050. Your Head's so hot, that your Brains bubble over.
  • 6067. Zeal is by no Means the same with Fury and Rage.
  • 6075. When you are Anvil, hold you still ;
    When you are Hammer, strike your Fill.
    • Compare Poor Richard's Almanack (1758) : When you're an Anvil, hold you still, When you're a Hammer, strike your Fill.
  • 6080. Early to go to Bed, and early to rise,
    Will make a Man Healthy, Wealthy and Wise.
  • 6082. Enough’s as good as a Feast,
    To one that’s not a Beast.
  • 6089. To borrow upon Usury, bringeth on Beggary.
  • 6099. Help, Hands ;
    For I have no Lands.
  • 6103. A Friend in Need
    Is a Friend in Deed.
  • 6124. What cannot be cured,
    Must be endured.
  • 6126. April-showers
    Bring May-flowers.
  • 6129. Who buys,
    Had need of an hundred Eyes ;
    But one's enough,
    For him that sells the Stuff.
  • 6131. When the Cat is away,
    The Mice may play.
  • 6164. To the Wise
    A Word may suffice.
  • 6172. Who so blind as he,
    That will not see?
  • 6185. Marry in Haste, and Repent at Leisure ;
    It's good to marry late, or never.
  • 6258. Follow Love, and it will flee ;
    Flee Love, and it will follow thee.
  • 6265.
    Happy’s the wooing,
    That’s not long a doing.
  • 6291. A Stitch in Time
    May save nine.
  • 6294. Well begun
    Is half done.
  • 6295. Birds of a Feather
    Flock together.
  • 6303. He that speaks the Thing he should not,
    Shall hear the Thing he would not.
  • 6318. Many a Little
    Make a Mickle.
  • 6319.
    Little Stroaks
    Fell great Oaks.
  • 6320. Man proposes ;
    God disposes.
  • 6335. Graft good Fruit all,
    Or graft not at all.
  • 6360. Without Pains,
    No Gains.
  • 6372. All Work, and no Play,
    Makes Jack a dull boy.
  • 6384. He that would please all, and himself too,
    Undertakes what none could ever do.
  • 6401. The Love of a Woman, and a Bottle of Wine,
    Are sweet for a Season; but last a short Time.
  • 6472. Nothing more smooth than Glass, yet nothing more brittle ;
    Nothing more fine than Wit, yet nothing more fickle.
  • 6493. A light Purse
    Is a heavy Curse.
  • 6495. An Ounce of Wit that's bought,
    Is worth a Pound that's taught.

External links[edit]

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