Thomas Lansing Masson

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Thomas Lansing Masson

Thomas Lansing Masson (1866–1934) was an American editor and author.

Quotes[edit]

  • Happiness is the feeling we experience when we are too busy to be miserable.
    • Tom Masson in: The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine, Vol. 61 (1901). p. 319
  • The love game is never called off on account of darkness.
    • In: Arbutus Yearbook, Indiana University., 1912, p. 249; Quoted in: Ralph Louis Woods (1967) The modern handbook of humor. p. 277
  • Hamlet is the tragedy of tackling a family problem too soon after college
    • In: Arbutus Yearbook, Indiana University., 1912, p. 255
  • Think of what would happen to us in America if there were no humorists; life would be one long Congressional record.
    • Thomas Lansing Masson (1922) Our American Humorists. p. ix ; Quoted in: Today's Health, (1957), p. 52
  • “Be yourself” is about the worst advice you can give some people.
    • Thomas L. Masson, The Book of Today, (1923), as cited in: Clifton Fadiman (1955) The American treasury, 1455-1955. p. 791
  • No brain is stronger than its weakest think.
    • Thomas L. Masson, Laughs (1926), p. 167.
  • Prohibition may be a disputed theory, but none can complain that it doesn't hold water.
    • Thomas Lansing Masson (1927) Tom Masson's Book of Wit & Humor. p. 1
  • If you want to be a flaming youth, you must have money to burn.
    • Thomas Lansing Masson (1927) Tom Masson's Book of Wit & Humor. p. 1
  • Think of what would happen to us in America if there were no humorists; life would be one long Congressional record.
    • Tom Masson, quoted in: Today's Health, (1957), p. 52

Quotes about Tom Masson[edit]

  • Readers of Tom Masson's charming little stories, light essays and graceful verse, would hardly suspect the author of being a constant student of the philosophy of Kant, Schopenhauer and Plato; yet a philosopher Mr. Masson certainly is, and the depth of his philosophy is proven by this gem from his recent volume, A Corner in Women:
"Motto for a Married Man.
"Be sure you are right, then keep it to yourself."
Mr. Masson has been a married man these fourteen years and more. Yet that be is far from being a cynical married man is shown by the graceful dedication of the volume referred to:
"This book is dedicated to three friends:
"To Cupid, who came to stay with me.
"To the Wolf, who sniffed at my door and honored me with his absence.
"And to the Stork, who brought me what I most desired."
Mr. Masson was born in Essex, Connecticut, in 1866. He has had a wide and varied experience as a traveler, business man and newspaper writer, and since 1893 has been the editor of Life.
  • From: Good Housekeeping, Vol. 47, (1908), p. 125

External links[edit]

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