Nixon Waterman

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Nixon Waterman (12 November 1859, Newark, Kendall County, Illinois1 September 1944, Canton, Norfolk County, Massachusetts) was a newspaper writer, poet and Chautauqua lecturer, who rose to prominence in the 1890s.

Quotes[edit]

  • No man can feel himself alone
    The while he bravely stands
    Between the best friends ever known
    His two good, honest hands.
    • Interludes, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).
  • Though life is made up of mere bubbles,
    'T is better than many aver,
    For while we've a whole lot of troubles,
    The most of them never occur.
    • Shreds and Patches, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919). Compare: "What we anticipate seldom occurs; what we least expected generally happens", Benjamin Disraeli, Henrietta Temple (1837), Book 2, chapter 4; "I say the very things that make the greatest Stir / An' the most interestin' things, are things that did n't occur", Sam Walter Foss, Things that did n't occur.
  • A rose to the living is more
    Than sumptuous wreaths to the dead.
    • A Rose to the Living, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).
  • If I knew you and you knew me—
    If both of us could clearly see,
    And with an inner sight divine
    The meaning of your heart and mine
    I'm sure that we would differ less
    And clasp our hands in friendliness:
    Our thoughts would pleasantly agree,
    If I knew you and you knew me.
    • In a Merry Mood, poem.

External links[edit]

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