Anton Webern

From Wikiquote
(Redirected from Webern)
Jump to: navigation, search
Anton Webern

Anton von Webern (3 December 188315 September 1945) was an Austrian composer of atonal music.


Sourced[edit]

  • Music is natural law as related to the sense of hearing.
    • The Path to the New Music
  • Except for the violin pieces and a few of my orchestra pieces, all of my works from the Passacaglia on relate to the death of my mother.
    • Letter to Alban Berg. Hayes, Malcolm. 1995. Anton von Webern, p.71
  • The historical achievement of Hitler, the extermination of Marxism, will be celebrated by posterity (including the French, the English and all the exploiters of crimes against Germany) no less gratefully than the great deeds of the greatest Germans. If only a man were born to music, who would finally exterminate the musical Marxists: for this it would be necessary for the masses to become better acquainted with this inherently elusive art—but this is, and must remain, a contradiction in terms. "Art" and the masses have never belonged together: so where would one never find the quantity of musical "brownshirts" necessarily to chase away the musical Marxists? I have already provided the weapons; but the music, the true German music of the greats, is in no way understood by the masses who are supposed to bear weapons.
    • Taruskin, Richard. 2009. "The Dark Side of the Moon". In his The Danger of Music and Other Anti-Utopian Essays. p.211-212

About Anton Webern[edit]

  • Doomed to total failure in a deaf world of ignorance and indifference, he inexorably kept on cutting out his diamonds, his dazzling diamonds, of whose mines he had a perfect knowledge.
  • "[the impression of the first time I heard Webern's music in a concert performance] was the same as I was to experience a few years later when I first laid eyes on a Mondriaan canvas...: those things, of which I had acquired an extremely intimate knowledge, came across as crude and unfinished when seen in reality"
    • Karel Goeyvaerts, quoted in: 1994. "Paris: Darmstadt 1947-1956: Excerpt from the Autobiographical Portrait", translated by Patrick Daly, Peter Vosch, and Roger Janssens. p.39

External links[edit]

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:
Commons
Wikimedia Commons has media related to: