Apple Inc.

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Here's to the crazy ones.

The misfits.
The rebels.
The troublemakers....

Apple Inc. is an American consumer electronics corporation headquartered in Cupertino, California, formerly known as Apple Computer Inc. it was founded in 1976 by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak.

Quotes[edit]

The people who are crazy enough to think
they can change the world, are the ones who do.
In the future, it won't be an act of faith. The hard part of what we're up against now is that people ask you about specifics and you can't tell them. A hundred years ago, if somebody had asked Alexander Graham Bell, "What are you going to be able to do with a telephone?" he wouldn't have been able to tell him the ways the telephone would affect the world. He didn't know that people would use the telephone to call up and find out what movies were playing that night or to order some groceries or call a relative on the other side of the globe. But remember that first the public telegraph was inaugurated, in 1844. It was an amazing breakthrough in communications. You could actually send messages from New York to San Francisco in an afternoon. People talked about putting a telegraph on every desk in America to improve productivity. But it wouldn't have worked. It required that people learn this whole sequence of strange incantations, Morse code, dots and dashes, to use the telegraph. It took about 40 hours to learn. The majority of people would never learn how to use it. So, fortunately, in the 1870s, Bell filed the patents for the telephone. It performed basically the same function as the telegraph, but people already knew how to use it. Also, the neatest thing about it was that besides allowing you to communicate with just words, it allowed you to sing. ~ Steve Jobs
Microsoft has had two goals. One was to copy the Mac and the other was to copy Lotus' success in the spreadsheet. And over the course of the last 10 years, Microsoft accomplished both of those goals. And now they are completely lost.
They were able to copy the Mac because the Mac was frozen in time. The Mac didn't change much for the last 10 years. It changed maybe 10 percent. It was a sitting duck. It's amazing that it took Microsoft 10 years to copy something that was a sitting duck. Apple, unfortunately, doesn't deserve too much sympathy. They invested hundreds and hundreds of millions of dollars into R&D, but very little came out They produced almost no new innovation since the original Mac itself. ~ Steve Jobs
  • Here's to the crazy ones.

    The misfits.
    The rebels.
    The troublemakers.

    The round pegs in the square holes.
    The ones who see things differently.
    They're not fond of rules.
    And they have no respect for the status quo.

    You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them.
    About the only thing you can't do is ignore them.

    Because they change things.
    They push the human race forward.

    While some see them as the crazy ones, we see genius.

    Because the people who are crazy enough to think
    they can change the world, are the ones who do.

  • Well, looks like you've got lots of stuff to do, before you do any stuff
  • 'It Just Works' Apple WWDC (2011)
  • Here’s to those who have always seen things differently.
    The ones who follow a vision, not a path.
    Where others percieve first as valuable,
    you value the first thing that actually matters.
    While others are distracted by the new,
    you focus on the significance of a whole new take.
    Even before you could see how, you never doubted
    we would change things.
    And then we did.
    Together.
    Again and again, and again, and again…
    Relentless optimism is what moves the world forward.
    So, keep seeing things differently.
    Keep thrusting there is always another way, a better way, a bigger way.
    One that lifts up humanity.
    Breaks down our barriers.
    And heals the landscape.
    You are the difference between the world as it was
    and the better place it will become.
    And different is the one thing about us,
    that will always be the same.

Quotes about Apple[edit]

Quotes about Apple Inc. and its products, sorted alphabetically by author or source
  • Apple is a business. And we’ve somehow attached this emotion [of love, devotion, and a sense of higher purpose] to a business which is just there to make money for its shareholders. That’s all it is, nothing more. Creating that association is probably one of Steve’s greatest accomplishments.
    • Andy Grignon, iPhone senior manager from 2005 to 2007, as interviewed in Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machinea documentary film directed by Alex Gibney
  • Microsoft has had two goals. One was to copy the Mac and the other was to copy Lotus' success in the spreadsheet. And over the course of the last 10 years, Microsoft accomplished both of those goals. And now they are completely lost.
    They were able to copy the Mac because the Mac was frozen in time. The Mac didn't change much for the last 10 years. It changed maybe 10 percent. It was a sitting duck. It's amazing that it took Microsoft 10 years to copy something that was a sitting duck. Apple, unfortunately, doesn't deserve too much sympathy. They invested hundreds and hundreds of millions of dollars into R&D, but very little came out They produced almost no new innovation since the original Mac itself.
  • Playboy: Then for now, aren't you asking home-computer buyers to invest $3000 in what is essentially an act of faith?
Jobs: In the future, it won't be an act of faith. The hard part of what we're up against now is that people ask you about specifics and you can't tell them. A hundred years ago, if somebody had asked Alexander Graham Bell, "What are you going to be able to do with a telephone?" he wouldn't have been able to tell him the ways the telephone would affect the world. He didn't know that people would use the telephone to call up and find out what movies were playing that night or to order some groceries or call a relative on the other side of the globe. But remember that first the public telegraph was inaugurated, in 1844. It was an amazing breakthrough in communications. You could actually send messages from New York to San Francisco in an afternoon. People talked about putting a telegraph on every desk in America to improve productivity. But it wouldn't have worked. It required that people learn this whole sequence of strange incantations, Morse code, dots and dashes, to use the telegraph. It took about 40 hours to learn. The majority of people would never learn how to use it. So, fortunately, in the 1870s, Bell filed the patents for the telephone. It performed basically the same function as the telegraph, but people already knew how to use it. Also, the neatest thing about it was that besides allowing you to communicate with just words, it allowed you to sing.
Playboy: Meaning what?
Jobs: It allowed you to intone your words with meaning beyond the simple linguistics. And we're in the same situation today. Some people are saying that we ought to put an IBM PC on every desk in America to improve productivity. It won't work. The special incantations you have to learn this time are "slash q-zs" and things like that. The manual for WordStar, the most popular word-processing program, is 400 pages thick. To write a novel, you have to read a novel—one that reads like a mystery to most people. They're not going to learn slash q-z any more than they're going to learn Morse code. That is what Macintosh is all about. It's the first "telephone" of our industry. And, besides that, the neatest thing about it, to me, is that the Macintosh lets you sing the way the telephone did. You don't simply communicate words, you have special print styles and the ability to draw and add pictures to express yourself.
  • Jobs: Most people have no concept of how an automatic transmission works, yet they know how to drive a car. You don't have to study physics to understand the laws of motion to drive a car. You don't have to understand any of this stuff to use Macintosh.
  • With the exception of the Macintosh, whose users have found many creative ways to avoid being restrained (or insulted) by the decision that they would find more than one mouse button confusing, the new generation of machines has not freed its users from the keyboard-heavy user interfaces that preceded them.
  • A frustration I have is that a lot of people increasingly seem to equate an advertising business model with somehow being out of alignment with your customers, ... I think it’s the most ridiculous concept. What, you think because you’re paying Apple that you’re somehow in alignment with them? If you were in alignment with them, then they’d make their products a lot cheaper!
    • Mark Zuckerberg, in “Inside Facebook's Plan to Wire the World” by Lev Grossman, Time (2014)

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

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