Polish proverbs

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Polish proverbs are short expressions of popular wisdom from all Polish speaking parts of the world.

A[edit]

  • Ani kura za darmo nie gdacze.
  • Za dziękuję nic się nie kupuje. (See in the Z section)
    • English equivalent: Nothing for nothing.
    • Your "Thank you" is fine but it will not help me pay my bills.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 799. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Anielskie usta a szatanskie serce.
    • English equivalent: A honey tongue and a heart of gall.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 108. ISBN 0415160502. 

B[edit]

  • Bez potrzeby wymówka, gotowe oskarżenie.
    • English equivalent: A guilty conscience needs no accuser.
    • "People who know they have done wrong reveal their guilt by the things they say or the way they interpret what other people say."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 112. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "243". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 227. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. 
  • Biada bez dzieci, biada i z dziećmi.
    • English equivalent: Children are uncertain comforts but certain cares.
    • "Children are bound to cause their parents anxiety, and may or may not also bring them joy."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 40. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 2 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 654. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Bierze wilk i liczone owce.
    • English equivalent: Cats eat what hussies spare.
    • "What a person tries to keep back through meanness is just as likely to be wasted anyway."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Pickering, David (1997). "X". Cassell Dictionary of Proverbs. Continuum International Publishing Group, Limited. p. X. ISBN 978-0-304-35020-9. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 641. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Bóg nie opuści, kto nań się spuści.
    • English equivalent: He who serves God has a good master.
    • "Religious ideas, supposedly private matters between man and god, are in practice always political ideas."
    • Christopher Hitchens, The Monarchy: A Critique of Britain's Favourite Fetish (1990), Chatto Counterblasts
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 873. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Bóg trójcę lubi.
    • English equivalent: All good things are three.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 80. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Bogaty rzadko sprawiedliwy albo sam, albo jego przodek.
    • English equivalent: No one gets rich quickly if he is honest.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 963. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Bogu świeczkę, a diabłu ogarek.
    • English equivalent: A fair face and a foul heart.
    • Meaning: Through appeasement, one tries to be friends with opposite sides. One tries to stay neutral when both sides argue/fight/quarrel.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 35. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Bogu ufaj, a ręki przykładaj.
  • Bóg pomaga temu, który sam rozwiązuje własne problemy.
    • English equivalent: God helps those who help themselves.
    • "When in trouble first of all every one himself should do his best to improve his condition."
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "X". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 150. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 732. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Broda nie czyni filozofa.
    • English equivalent: If the beard were all, the goat might preach.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 117. ISBN 0415160502. 

C[edit]

  • Chociaż w ciasnocie, ale w zgodzie.
    • English equivalent: The more the merrier.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1094. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Ciekawość to pierwszy stopień do piekła. "
    • English equivalent: Curiosity killed the cat.
    • "And Lot's wife, of course, was told not to look back where all those people and their homes had been. But she did look back, and I love her for that, because it was so human. So she was turned into a pillar of salt. So it goes."
    • Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five (1969)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 684. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Cierpieć z drugimi lżej.
    • Meaning: Shared misfortune has lesser impact on each individual involved.
    • English equivalent: Misery loves company.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 187. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Co było, nie wróci.
    • Translation: What was, won't come back.
  • Co lekko przyszło, lekko pójdzie.
  • Łatwo przyszło, łatwo poszło.
    • English equivalent: Easy come, easy go.
    • Meaning: Something good that enters your life easily, will also often leave quickly.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 762. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Co mnie dziś, tobie jutro.
    • English equivalent: Today me, tomorrow thee.
    • "We make fun of those we're most scared of becoming."
    • Neil Strauss, Emergency: This Book Will Save Your Life (2009)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1038. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Co z jabłoni spadnie, niedaleko upadnie.
  • Niedaleko spada jabłko od jabłoni.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 488. ISBN 0415096243. 
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Coś posiał – zbieraj
  • Kto sieje wiatr, zbiera burzę.
  • Tak się wyśpisz, jak sobie pościelesz.
    • Translation: What you reap is what you sow.
    • Meaning: It is only you who can blame or praise yourself for your ups and downs in life.
    • Strauss (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 394. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Cudze ręce lekkie, ale niespore.
    • Translation: Someone else's hands are light, but not big.
    • English equivalent: For what thou canst do thyself, rely not on another.
    • Latin equivalent: Ne quid expectes amicos, quod tute agere possis.
      • Translation: Expect nothing from friends, do what you can do yourself.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 600. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Cudze wady rychlej niż swoje obaczamy.
    • Meaning: Somebody else's faults and misdeeds are so much easier to spot that our own.
    • English equivalent: Forget other faults remembering your own; Forgive and forget.
    • Critical remark: English equivalent "Forgive and forget" does not reflect the meaning of the Polish proverb.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 838. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Czasowi ludzie służą.
    • English equivalent: Gnaw the bone which is fallen to thy lot.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 865. ISBN 0415096243. 

D[edit]

  • Daj krowie w żłobie, to ona da tobie.
    • English equivalent: It's by the head that the cow gives the milk.
    • "It is not enough to be industrious; so are the ants. What are you industrious about?"
    • Henry David Thoreau, letter to Harrison Blake (16 November 1857).
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1039. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Dar za dar, słowa za słowa.
    • English equivalent: You must meet roughness with roughness.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1111. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Dla chcącego nic trudnego.
    • English equivalent: If there is a will, there is a way.
    • Source needed
  • Do tanga trzeba dwojga.
    • English equivalent: It takes two to tango.
    • '"The reason that there are so few good conversationalists is that most people are thinking about what they are going to say and not about what the others are saying."
    • François de La Rochefoucauld, Réflexions diverses, IV: De la conversation. (1731)
    • Furiassi, C. The Anglicization of European Lexis, John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  • Dobra psu i mucha.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1079. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Doczeka się sierpa pokrzywa.
  • Kto pod kim dołki kopie, ten sam w nie wpada.
    • He who digs a pit for others, will fall in it himself.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 651. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Domowe psy, choć się kąsają, wilka ujrzawszy nań się rzucają.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 729. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Dobra wola za uczynek stoi.
    • English equivalent: Take the will for the deed.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 881. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Dobre daleko słychać, a złe jeszcze dalej.
    • Meaning: Good deeds are remembered but bad ones are etched in our memory.
    • Translation: Ingratitude is the world's reward.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 55. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Dobry początek to połowa roboty.
    • English equivalent: A good beginning makes a good ending; Well begun is half done.
    • "Starting properly ensures the speedy completion of a process. A – beginning is often blocked by one or more obstacles (potential barriers) the removal of which may ensure the smooth course of the process."
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 228. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 24. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Dobrymi chęciami jest piekło wybrukowane.
    • English equivalent: The road to hell is paved with good intentions.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 257. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Doktorze, sam się wylecz!
  • Dziecko, pijany i głupi zawsze prawdę powie.
    • English equivalent: Children, fools and drunken men tell the truth.
    • "Children and fools have no inhibition, and alcohol consumed removes the inhibition against telling the truth that occasionally one would like to keep secret."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 272. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

G[edit]

  • Gdy idziesz zabijać muchę, nie zabieraj ze sobą armaty.
    • Translation: When out to kill a (house) fly, don't roll out a cannon to accomplish it.
    • Meaning: Adjust your means to your goals. Don't overreact there where less drastic action(s) will suffice.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 723. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Gdzie nie można przeskoczyć, tam trzeba podleźć.
    • English equivalent: Skill is better than strength.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 681. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Gdzie pana kochają, tam i jego pieska głaszczą.
    • Critical remark: This is not a Polish proverb. It is merely an interpretation of the English proverb written in Polish.
    • English equivalent: Love me, love my dog.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 953. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Głaszcz ty kotowi skórę, a on ogon wzgórę.
    • "The more you stroke the cat , the more he raises his tail."
    • English equivalent: The more you stroke the cat's tail, the more he raises his back.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1184. ISBN 0415096243. 

  • Głos ludu, głos Boga.
    • English equivalent: The voice of the people is the voice of god.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1164. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Gotowe zdrowie, kto chorobie powie.
    • English equivalent: A problem shared is a problem halved.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 100. ISBN 0415160502. 

H[edit]

  • Historia się powtarza.
  • Historia lubi się powtarzać.
    • English equivalent: History repeats itself.
    • "In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life — It goes on."
    • Robert Frost, as quoted in The Harper Book of Quotations (1993) edited by Robert I. Fitzhenry, p. 261.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 977. ISBN 0415096243. 

I[edit]

  • I cyprysy maja swoje kaprysy.
    • English equivalentː Every fool is pleased with his own folly.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "147". Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 139. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. 

J[edit]

  • Jacy rodzice, takie dzieci.
    • English equivalent: As the old cock crows, so crows the young.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 138. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Jak dają, to bierz.
    • English equivalent: When the pig is proffered, hold up the poke.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1226. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Jak sobie pościelesz, tak się wyśpisz.
    • English equivalent: As ye sow, so shall ye reap.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 143. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Jaka matka, taka Katka.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • "Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daiky."
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Jaką miarką mierzysz, taką ci odmierzą.
    • English equivalent: What goes around comes around.
    • Meaning: Whatever criteria you use to evaluate others, exactly the same treatment awaits you.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1219. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Jaka płaca, taka praca.
    • Meaning: Higher wages yield better results.
    • English equivalent: You get what you pay for.
    • Similar proverb: Jaka praca, taka płaca.
      • Meaning: Antonym of the above proverb; you are paid well, if you work well.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 494. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Jaki do jedzenia, taki do roboty.
    • English equivalent: Quick at meat, quick at work.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1150. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Jaki ojciec, taki syn.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • "Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily."
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Jakie przyczyny, takie też skutki.
    • Another proverb in Polish reflecting the same meaning: "Nie ma dymu bez ognia."
      • Translation: Where there is smoke, there is fire.
    • English equivalent: Every why has its wherefore.
    • "Everything has an underlying reason."
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 80. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 22 September 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 765. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Jakie pytanie, taka odpowiedź.
    • English equivalent: Just as one calls into the forest, so it echoes back.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 139. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Kto chce wygrać gąsiora, trzeba ważyć kaczora.
    • English equivalent: Set a herring to catch a whale.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1134. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Jeża nie dotykaj, bo ukłuje.
    • English equivalent: Do not play with edged tools.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 716. ISBN 0415096243. 

K[edit]

  • Kłamcy dobrej pamięci i dowcipu prędkiego potrzeba.
    • English equivalent: A liar should have a good memory.
    • "Liars must remember the untruths they have told, to avoid contradicting themselves at some later date."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 167. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "274". Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 257. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. Retrieved on 24 November 2013. 
  • Kogo Pan Bóg stworzy, tego nie umorzy.
    • English equivalent: Each day brings it own bread.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 757. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Komu nie ma rady, temu nie ma pomocy.
    • English equivalent: He that will not be counseled cannot be helped.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 964. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kozła doić próżno.
    • English equivalent: You can't milk a bull.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1040. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Ksiądz prałat tłumaczy, a żyje inaczej.
    • English equivalent: Preachers say: do as I say, not as i do.
    • ** Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 706. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kto łaskę pańską szacuje, coś w sobie niepewnego czuje.
    • English equivalent: A king's favour is no inheritance.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 24. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Kto czeka, ten się doczeka.
    • English equivalent. He that can have patience can have what he will.
    • "If it is humanly possible, consider it within your reach."
    • Antonius, Marcus (180 BC). On Essays and Meditations. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 87. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Kto dwa zające goni, żadnego nie złapie.
    • English equivalent: Grasp all, lose all
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 886. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kto ma żytko, ma wszystko.
    • English equivalent: Plough deep while sluggards sleep, and you will have corn to sell and keep.
    • "A master in the art of living draws no sharp distinction between his work and his play; his labour and his leisure; his mind and his body; his education and his recreation. He hardly knows which is which."
    • L. P. Jacks, Education through Recreation (1932), p. 1.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1001. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kto nie idzie naprzód, ten się cofa.
    • English equivalent: He who does not advance goes backwards.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 445. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kto nie ma w głowie, musi mieć w nogach.
    • English equivalent: Who falls short in the head must be long in the heels.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "149". Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 140. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. 
  • Kto prawdzie dzwoni, taki na guz goni.
    • English equivalent: All truths are not to be told.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 282. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kto rano wstaje, temu Pan Bóg daje.
    • German: Morgenstund hat Gold im Mund.
    • English equivalent: Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.
    • Meaning: "A lifestyle that involves neither staying up late nor sleeping late is good for body and mind and leads to financial success."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 70. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 5 September 2013. 
    • Mianowskiego, Kasa (1894). Ksiega przyslów: przypowieści i wrażeń przyslowiowych polskich Ksiega przyslów: przypowieści i wrażeń przyslowiowych polskich, Samuel Adalberg. Druk E. Skiwskiego. p. 614. 
  • Kto się pańską łaską chwali, cemsi(sic) nejistym(sic) się żali.Template:Awkward
    • English equivalent: A king's favour is no inheritance.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 24. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Kogo Bóg chce skarać, wtedy mu rozum odejmie.
    • English equivalent: Whom God will destroy, he first make mad.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 841. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Nie kupuj kota w worku.
    • English equivalent: Let the buyer have a thousand eyes for the seller wants only one.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1101. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kropla drąży kamień.
    • English equivalent: Constant dropping wears the stone.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 187. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Kto się ożeni, to się odmieni.
    • English equivalent: Marry and grow tame.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1085. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kuj żelazo, póki gorące.
    • German translation: Das Eisen schmieden, solange es heiss ist.
    • English equivalent: Strike while the iron is hot.
    • Mianowskiego, Kasa (1894). Ksiega przyslów: przypowieści i wrażeń przyslowiowych polskich Ksiega przyslów: przypowieści i wrażeń przyslowiowych polskich, Samuel Adalberg. Druk E. Skiwskiego. p. 546. 

L[edit]

  • Łakomy wszystkim zły, sobie najgorszy.
    • English equivalent: The covetous man is good to none and worst to himself.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 83. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Lekarstwo podczas, cięższe niż choroba.Template:Awkward
    • English equivalent: The remedy is often worse than the disease.
    • "Action taken to put something right is often more unpleasant or damaging than the original problem."
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 232. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. entry 646. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Lepiej nie dosolić, nie przesolić.
    • Translation: Better not to add salt than oversalt.
    • English equivalent: Better underdone than overdone.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 589. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Lepiej pózno, niż wcale.
    • Translation: Delayed is preferable to never.
    • English equivalent: Better late than never.
    • Meaning: "It is better that somebody arrives or something happens later than expected or desired, than not at all."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 25. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 30 June 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 584. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Lepiej umrzeć stojąc niż żyć na kolanach.
    • Translation: It is better to die standing than to live on your knees.
    • English equivalent: "Death before dishonour."
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 164. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Lepsze jedno dziś, niż dwoje jutro.
    • Translation: Better one today, than two tomorrow.
    • English equivalent: One today is worth two tomorrows.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1137. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Lepsze jest wrogiem dobrego.'
    • English equivalent: "Better is the enemy of good."
    • Meaning: The aim for perfection or mastery might slow down progress.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 166. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Lepsze imię dobre niźli bogactwa hojne.
    • English equivalent: A good name is the best of all treasures.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 58. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Lepszy grosz dany niż złoty obiecany.
    • English equivalent: Better an egg today than a hen tomorrow.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 75. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Lepszy własny chleb niż pożyczona bułka.
    • English equivalent: Dry bread at home is better than roast meat abroad.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 754. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Lepsza rozwaga niż odwaga.
    • English equivalent: Discretion is the better part of valor.
    • "Confront your enemies, avoid them while you can."
    • Englishman in New York (198X)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 703. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Lepsze zdrowie niż pieniądze.
    • English equivalent: Good health is above wealth.
    • "What shall it profit a man if he gains the whole world and loses his health?"
    • Dale Carnegie, How to Stop Worrying and Start Living (1948)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Lepszy wróbel w garści niż gołąb na dachu
    • Translation: A sparrow in the hand is better than a pigeon on the roof.
    • English equivalent: A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
    • Grębski, Marek (2008). Sukces na egzaminie. Sklep WSiP 10 % rabatu. p. 14. ISBN 8302089346. 
  • Ludzi słuchaj, a swój rozum miej.
    • Translation: Listen to people, but keep your own wits.
    • English equivalent: Though thou hast ever so many counsellors, yet do not forsake the counsel of thy own soul.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1044. ISBN 0415096243. 

M[edit]

  • Mowa wiatr, a pismo grunt.
    • English equivalent: Paper is forbearing.
    • "Paper, they say, does not blush, but I assure you it’s not true and that it’s blushing just as I am now, all over. "
    • Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov (1879–1880)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1160. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Mowa pospolita, pospolicie prawdziwa.
    • English equivalent: Common fame is seldom to blame.
    • "EVIL. That which one believes of others. It is a sin to believe evil of others, but it is seldom a mistake."
    • H. L. Mencken, A Book of Burlesques (1924), p. 203.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 662. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Myśl długo, czyń prędko.
    • English equivalent: A closed mouth catches no flies.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 751. ISBN 0415096243. 

N[edit]

  • Na grubą gałąź trzeba grubego klina.
    • English equivalent: ”You must meet roughness with roughness.”
    • Example: If someone treats you poorly, you should treat him equally poorly.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 12. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Na kulawym koniu daleko nie zajedziesz.
    • English equivalent: Take heed of enemies reconciled and of meat twice boiled.
    • Meaning: Your former enemies might cunningly take revenge on you just out of spite. Trust not a reconciled enemy more than an open foe.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 25. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Nie chwal dnia przed zachodem słońca.
    • Translation: Don't praise the day before sunset.
    • Meaning: Don't celebrate until you are absolutely sure there is a reason to do so.
    • Kamiński, Marek (2008). Razem na Bieguny. Sklep WSiP 10 % rabatu. p. 176. ISBN 8391100960. 
  • Nie ma reguły bez wyjątku.
    • English equivalent: There is no rule without an exception.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1174. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Nie od pracy, ale od złej doli głowa boli.
    • English equivalent: Fretting cares make grey hairs.
    • Meaning: Worrying is a negative activity that can age you prematurely.
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 631. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Nie trzeba dowierzać.
    • English equivalent: Diffidence is the right eye of prudence.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 701. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Nie wierz słowom, a czynom.
    • Translation: Bear witness to facts, not words.
    • English equivalent: No need of words, trust deeds.
    • Meaning: "Actions may be, and indeed sometimes are deceptive in a measure though not as much so as words; and accordingly are received in general as more full and satisfactory proofs of the real disposition and character of persons than verbal expressions."
    • Source for meaning: Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 10. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 91. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Nad możność nikogo nie pociagają.
    • English equivalent: Do as you may, if you can't do as you could.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 707. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Niech się najbardziej wysmuknie sowa, przecie nie dojdzie sokoła.
    • English equivalent: Judge not a man and things at first sight.
    • "No good Book, or good thing of any sort, shows its best face at first."
    • Thomas Carlyle, Essays, "Novalis" (1829)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 713. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Niecnotliwa zazdrość, chyba w niebie jej nie masz.
    • English equivalent: Envy takes no holiday.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 767. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Niedaleko pada jabłko od jabłoni.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Nie potrzeba ognia do ognia przydawać.
    • English equivalent: Don't add fuel to the fire.
    • Meaning: One should not make a bad situation even worse by an improper remark.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 338. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Nie przyszła góra do Mahometa, Mahomet przyszedł do góry.
    • English equivalent: If the mountain will not come to Mohammed, Mohammed must go to the mountain.
    • Meaning: "If you cannot get what you want, you must adapt yourself to the circumstances or adopt a different approach."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 135. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1006. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Nie pytaj starego, pytaj bywałego.
    • Translation: Do not ask the old – ask the experienced.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 808. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Na pochyłe drzewo wszystkie kozy skaczą.
    • Translation: All goats jump onto leaning trees.
    • Meaning: If you leave yourself open to abuse, others will abuse you.
    • English equivalent: If you turn yourself into a doormat, everyone will walk over you.
    • Kamiński, Marek (2003). Uniwersalny słownik języka polskiego, Stanisław Dubisz. Wydawn. Naukowe PWN. p. 716. ISBN 8301138580. 
  • Nic nowego pod słońcem.
    • English equivalent: Nothing is new (under the sun).
    • Meaning: Absolutely everything has been done before.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1114. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Nie dziel skóry na niedźwiedziu.
    • Translation: Don't share the skin while it's still on the bear.
    • Adamska-Sałaciak, Arleta (2003). Nowy słownik Fundacji Kościuszkowskiej polsko-angielski - The new Kosciuszko Foundation dictionary Polish-English, Volym 2. Kościuszko Foundation. p. 514. ISBN 832420007X. 
  • Nie mów „hop”, póki nie przeskoczysz.
    • Translation: Don't say 'up', before you have jumped.
    • English equivalent: Walk the walk, then talk the talk.
    • "I always pass on good advice. It is the only thing to do with it. It is never of any use to oneself."
    • Oscar Wilde, The Good Husband (1895)
    • Drabik, Lidia (2006). Słownik idiomów polskich PWN. Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN. p. 321. ISBN 8301148322. 
  • Nie trzeba dowierzać.
    • English equivalent: Diffidence is the right eye of prudence.
    • Meaning: When forming a belief be doubtful; no one is always right, after all.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 701. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Nie trzeba dowierzać.
    • English equivalent: Distrust is the mother of safety.
    • Meaning: Trust no one except yourself, and don't trust yourself entirely either. Trust, but verify.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 699. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Nie wszystko złoto, co się świeci.
    • English equivalent: All that glitters is not gold.
    • Meaning: An attractive appearance may be deceptive. It may cover or hide a much less favourable content.
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 114. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 77. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Nim słońce wzejdzie, rosa oczy wygryzie.
    • English equivalent: While the grass grows the steed starves.
    • Meaning: Dreams or expectations may be realized too late.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1228. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Nowa miotła dobrze zamiata.
    • English equivalent: "New brooms sweep clean."
    • Meaning: Newcomers are the most ambitious.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1103. ISBN 0415096243. 

O[edit]

  • Obiecianki - cacanki.
    • English equivalent: Eggs and oaths are soon broken.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 765. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Od przybytku głowa nie boli.
    • English equivalent: A store is no sore; Keep a thing seven years and you'll find a use for it.
    • Meaning: "An object that seems useless now may be just what you need at some future time, so do not discard it."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 159. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Roman Zawlinśki (1979). Poradnik językowy. Państwowe Wydawn Naukowe. 
  • Od wymysłów jeszcze nikt nie umarł.
    • English equivalent: Hard words break no bones.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 17. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Odmiana słodzi rzeczy.
    • English equivalent: Variety is the spice of life.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 89. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Okazja łysa z tyłu, z przodu ją brać trzeba.
    • English equivalent: Opportunity knocks only once.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 400. ISBN 0415096243. 

P[edit]

  • Pieniądze szczęścia nie dają.
    • English equivalent: Wealth rarely brings happiness.
    • "Animals are happy so long as they have health and enough to eat. Human beings, one feels, ought to be, but in the modern world they are not, at least in a great majority of cases. If you are unhappy yourself, you will probably be prepared to admit that you are not exceptional in this. If you are happy, ask yourself how many of your friends are so. And when you have reviewed your friends, teach yourself the art of reading faces; make yourself receptive to the moods of those whom you meet in the course of an ordinary day. A mark in every face I meet, Marks of weakness, marks of woe, says Blake. Though the kinds are different, you will find that unhappiness meets you everywhere. Let us suppose that you are in New York, in New York, the most typically modern of great cities. Stand in a busy street during working hours, or on a main thoroughfare at a week-end, or at a dance of an evening; empty your mind of your own ego, and let the personalities of the strangers about you take possession of you one after another. You will find that each of these different crowds has its own trouble. In the work-hour crowd you will see anxiety, excessive concentration, dyspepsia, lack of interest in anything but the struggle, incapacity for play, unconsciousness of their fellow creatures. On a main road at the week-end you will see men and women, all 'comfortably off, and some very rich, engaged in the pursuit of pleasure. This pursuit is conducted by all at a uniform pace, that of the slowest car in the procession; it is impossible to see the road for the cars, or the scenery, since looking aside would cause an accident; all the occupants of all the cars are absorbed in the desire to pass other cars, which they cannot do on account of the crowd; if their minds wander from this preoccupation, as will happen occasionally to those who are not themselves driving, unutterable boredom seizes upon them and stamps their features with trivial discontent. Once in a way a car-load of coloured people will show genuine enjoyment, but will cause indignation by erratic behaviour, and ultimately get into the hands of the police owing to an accident: enjoyment in holiday time is illegal.
      Or, again, watch people at a gay evening. All come determined to be happy, with the kind of grim resolve with which one determines not to make a fuss at the dentist's. It is held that drink and petting are the gateways to joy, so people get drunk quickly, and try not to notice how much their partners disgust them. After a sufficient amount of drink, men begin to weep, and to lament how unworthy they are, morally, of the devotion of their mothers. All that alcohol does for them is to liberate the sense of sin, which reason suppresses in saner moments .
      The causes of these various kinds of unhappiness lie partly in the social system, partly in individual psychology -- which, of course, is itself to a considerable extent a product of the social system. I have written before about the changes in the social system required to promote happiness. Concerning the abolition of war, of economic exploitation, of education in cruelty and fear, it is not my intention to speak in this volume. To discover a system for the avoidance of war is a vital need for our civilisation; but no such system has a chance while men are so unhappy that mutual extermination seems to them less dreadful than continued endurance of the light of day. To prevent the perpetuation of poverty is necessary if the benefits of machine production are to accrue in any degree to those most in need of them; but what is the use of making everybody rich if the rich themselves are miserable? Education in cruelty and fear is bad, but no other kind can be given by those who are themselves the slaves of these passions. These considerations lead us to the problem of the individual: what can a man or woman, here and now, in the midst of our nostalgic society, do to achieve happiness for himself or herself? In discussing this problem, I shall confine my attention to those who are not subject to any extreme cause of outward misery. I shall assume a sufficient income to secure food and shelter, sufficient health to make ordinary bodily activities possible. I shall not consider the great catastrophes such as loss of all one's children, or public disgrace. There are things to be said about such matters, and they are important things, but they belong to a different order from the things that I wish to say. My purpose is to suggest a cure for the ordinary day-to-day unhappiness from which most people in civilised countries suffer, and which is all the more unbearable because, having no obvious external cause, it appears inescapable. I believe this unhappiness to be very largely due to mistaken views of the world, mistaken 'ethics, mistaken habits of life, leading to destruction of that natural zest and appetite for possible things upon which all happiness, whether of men or animals, ultimately depends. These are matters which lie within the power of the individual, and I propose to suggest the changes by which his happiness, given average good fortune, may be achieved. Perhaps the best introduction to the philosophy which I wish to advocate will be a few words of autobiography. I was not born happy. As a child, my favourite hymn was: 'Weary of earth and laden with my sin'. At the age of five, I reflected that, if I should live to be seventy, I had only endured, so far, a fourteenth part of my whole life, and I felt the long-spread-out boredom ahead of me to be almost unendurable. In adolescence, I hated life and was continually on the verge of suicide, from which, however, I was restrained by the desire to know more mathematics. Now, on the contrary, I enjoy life; I might almost say that with every year that passes I enjoy it more. This is due partly to having discovered what were the things that I most desired and having gradually acquired many of these things. Partly it is due to having successfully dismissed certain objects of desire - such as the acquisition of indubitable knowledge about something or other - as essentially unattainable. But very largely it is due to a diminishing preoccupation with myself. Like others who had a Puritan education, I had the habit of meditating on my sins, follies, and shortcomings. I seemed to myself - no doubt justly - a miserable specimen. Gradually I learned to be indifferent to myself and my deficiencies; I came to centre my attention increasingly upon external objects: the state of the world, various branches of knowledge, individuals for whom I felt affection. External interests, it is true, bring each its own possibility of pain: the world may be plunged in war, knowledge in some direction may be hard to achieve, friends may die. But pains of these kinds do not destroy the essential quality of life, as do those that spring from disgust with self. And every external interest inspires some activity which, so long as the interest remains alive, is a complete preventive of ennui. Interest in oneself, on the contrary, leads to no activity of a progressive kind. It may lead to the keeping of a diary, to getting psycho-analysed, or perhaps to becoming a monk. But the monk will not be happy until the routine of the monastery has made him forget his own soul. The happiness which he attributes to religion he could have obtained from becoming a crossing-sweeper, provided he were compelled to remain one. External discipline is the only road to happiness for those unfortunates whose self-absorption is too profound to be cured in any other way.Self-absorption is of various kinds. We may take the sinner, the narcissist, and the megalomaniac as three very common types. When I speak of "the sinner," I do not mean the man who commits sins: sins are committed by every one or no one, according to our definition of the word. I mean the man who is absorbed in the consciousness of sin. This man is perpetually incurring his own disapproval, which, if he is religious, he interprets as the disapproval of God. He has an image of himself as he thinks he ought to be, which is in continual conflict with his knowledge of himself as he is. If, in his conscious thought, he has long since discarded the maxims that he was taught at his mother's knee, his sense of sin may be buried deep in his unconscious, and only emerge when he is drunk or asleep. Nevertheless it may suffice to take the savor out of everything. At bottom he still accepts all the prohibitions he was taught in infancy. Swearing is wicked; drinking is wicked; ordinary business shrewdness is wicked; above all, sex is wicked. He does not, of course, abstain from any of these pleasures, but they are all poisoned for him by the feeling that they degrade him. The one pleasure that he desires with his whole soul is that of being approvingly caressed by his mother, which he can remember having experienced in childhood. This pleasure being no longer open to him, he feels that nothing matters; since he must sin, he decides to sin deeply. When he falls in love, he looks for maternal tenderness, but cannot accept it, because, owing to the mother-image, he feels no respect for any woman with whom he has sexual relations. Then, in his disappointment, he becomes cruel, repents of his cruelty, and starts afresh on the dreary round of imagined sin and real remorse. This is the psychology of very many apparently hard-boiled reprobates. What drives them astray is devotion to an unattainable object (mother or mother-substitute) together with the inculcation, in early years, of a ridiculous ethical code. Liberation from the tyranny of early beliefs and affections is the first step towards happiness for these victims of maternal 'virtue'. Narcissism is, in a sense, the converse of an habitual sense of sin; it consists in the habit of admiring oneself and wishing to be admired. Up to a point it is, of course, normal, and not to be deplored; it is only in its excesses that it becomes a grave evil. In many women, especially rich society women, the capacity for feeling love is completely dried up, and is replaced by a powerful desire that' all men should love them. When a woman of this kind is sure that a man loves her, she has no further use for him. The same thing occurs, though less frequently, with men; the classic example is the hero of that remarkable novel "Liaisons Dangereuses " which describes the love affairs of French aristocrats just before the Revolution. When vanity is carried to this height, there is no genuine interest in any other person, and therefore no real satisfaction to be obtained from love. Other interests fail even more disastrously. A narcissist, for example, inspired by the homage paid to great painters, may become an art student; but, as painting is for him a mere means to an end, the technique never becomes interesting, and no subject can be seen except in relation to self. The result is failure and disappointment, with ridicule instead of the expected adulation. The same thing applies to those novelists whose novels always have themselves idealized as heroines. All serious success in work depends upon some genuine interest in the material with which the work is concerned. The tragedy of one successful politician after another is the gradual substitution of narcissism for an interest in the community and the measures for which he stands. The man who is only interested in himself is not admirable, and is not felt to be so. Consequently the man whose sole concern with the world is that it shall admire him is not likely to achieve his object. But even if he does, he will not be completely happy, since human instinct is never completely self-centered, and the narcissist is limiting himself artificially just as truly as is the man dominated by a sense of sin. The primitive man might be proud of being a good hunter, but he also enjoyed the activity of the chase. Vanity, when it passes beyond a point, kills pleasure in every activity for its own sake, and thus leads inevitably to listlessness and boredom. Often its source is diffidence, and its cure lies in the growth of self-respect. But this is only to be gained by successful activity inspired by objective interests. The megalomaniac differs from the narcissist by the fact that he wishes to be powerful rather than charming, and seeks to be feared rather than loved. To this type belong many lunatics and most of the great men in history. Love of power, like vanity, is a strong element in normal human nature, and as such is to be accepted; it becomes deplorable only when it is excessive or associated with an insufficient sense of reality. Where this occurs, it makes a man unhappy or foolish, if not both. The lunatic who thinks he is a crowned head may be, in a sense, happy, but his happiness is not of a kind that any sane person would envy. Alexander the Great was psychologically of the same type as the lunatic, though he possessed the talent to achieve the lunatic's dream. He could not, however, achieve his own dream, which enlarged its scope as his achievement grew. When it became clear that he was the greatest conqueror known to fame, he decided that he was a god. Was he a happy man? His drunkenness, his furious rages, his indifference to women, and his claim to divinity, suggest that he was not. There is no ultimate satisfaction in the cultivation of one element of human nature at the expense of all the others, nor in viewing all the world as raw material for the magnificence of one's own ego. Usually the megalomaniac, whether insane or nominally sane, is the product of some excessive humiliation. Napoleon suffered at school from inferiority to his schoolfellows, who were rich aristocrats, while he was a penurious scholarship boy. When he allowed the return of the émigrés, he had the satisfaction of seeing his former schoolfellows , bowing down before him. 'What bliss! Yet it led to the wish to obtain a similar satisfaction at the expense of the Czar, and this led to Saint Helena. Since no man can be omnipotent, a life dominated wholly by love of power can hardly fail, sooner or later, to meet with obstacles that cannot be overcome. The knowledge that this is so can be prevented from obtruding on consciousness only by some form of lunacy, though if a man is sufficiently great he can imprison or execute those who point this out to him. Repressions in the political and in the psychoanalytic senses thus go hand in hand. And wherever psychoanalytic repression in any marked form takes place, there is no genuine happiness. Power kept within its proper bounds may add greatly to happiness, but as the sole end of life it leads to disaster, inwardly if not outwardly. The psychological causes of unhappiness, it is clear, are many and various. But all have something in common. The typical unhappy man is one who, having been deprived in youth of some normal satisfaction, has come to value this one kind of satisfaction more than any other, and has therefore given to his life a one-sided direction, together with a quite undue emphasis upon the achievement as opposed to the activities connected with it. There is, however, a further development which is very common in the present day. A man may feel so completely thwarted that he seeks no form of satisfaction, but only distraction and oblivion. He then becomes a devotee of 'pleasure'. That is to say he seeks to make life bearable by becoming less alive. Drunkenness, for example, is temporary suicide; the happiness that it brings is merely negative, a momentary cessation of unhappiness. The narcissist and the megalomaniac believe that happiness is possible, though they may adopt mistaken means of achieving it; but the man who seeks intoxication, in whatever form, has given up hope except in oblivion. In his case, the first thing to be done is to persuade him that happiness is desirable. Men who are unhappy, like men who sleep badly, are always proud of the fact. Perhaps their pride is like that of the fox who had lost his tail; if so, the way to cure it is to point out to them how they can grow a new tail. Very few men, I believe, will deliberately choose unhappiness if they see a way of being happy. I do not deny that such men exist, but they are not sufficiently numerous to be important. I shall therefore assume that the reader would rather be happy than unhappy. Whether I can help him to realise this wish, I do not know; but at any rate the attempt can do no harm."
    • Bertrand Russell, The Conquest of Happiness (1930)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 671. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Piosnka najprzyjemniejsza każdemu, gdy go chwalą.
    • English equivalent: There is no sound more pleasing than one's owns praises.
    • Meaning: Truthful praise costs little and yields very much.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 319. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Po to są pieniądze, aby je wydawać.
    • English equivalent: Money is there to be spent.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1013. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Poznać błazna i bez dzwonków.
    • Translation: A fool does not need any bells.
    • English equivalent: A tongue of a fool carves a piece of his heart to all that sit near him.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 136. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Postawić wszystsko na jedną kartę.
    • English equivalent: Don't put all your eggs in the same basket.
    • Meaning: "Spread your risks or investments so that if one enterprise fails you will not lose everything."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 63. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 18 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 715. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Prawda nie głaszcze.
    • English equivalent: Not all truths are proper to be told.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1111. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Prawda w winie.
    • English equivalent: In wine there is truth.
    • Latin equivalent: In vino veritas.
    • Meaning: Alcohol consumed removes the inhibition against telling the truth that occasionally one would like to keep secret.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 272. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Kto buja wysoko, bywa próżny.
    • English equivalent: It is not the cow that shouts the loudest that gives the most milk (French).
    • Meaning: It is not he who advertises for himself the most that can achieve the greatest results.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1169. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Prosta droga najkrótsza.
    • Translation: Fortune favours the bold.
    • Strauss (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 394. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Punktualność jest grzecznością królów.
    • English equivalent: Punctuality is the virtue of princes.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1142. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Pychy niedobry koniec bywa.
    • Translation: Pride comes before fall.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1149. ISBN 0415096243. 

R[edit]

  • Rannego wstania, rannej siejby i rannego ożenienia jeszcze nikt nie żałował.
    • English equivalent: Who has not served cannot command.
    • Meaning: One must have been controlled in the same situation one wishes to properly control others.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 758. ISBN 0415096243. 

S[edit]

  • Serce nie kłamie.
    • English equivalent: The heart sees farther than the head.
    • English equivalent: Trust your instincts.
    • Julia Louis-Dreyfus, How She Broke the Seinfeld Curse, Redbook Magazine (2010)
  • Słowa myśl pochłaniają, słowa myśli kłamią.
    • English equivalent: Men talk only to conceal the mind.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1088. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Słyszy czujny, choć śpi.
    • English equivalent: An ounce of patience is worth a pound of brains.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 415. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Szanuj honor od młodu.
    • Translation: Old habits die hard.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1122. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Śpiesz się powoli.
    • English equivalent: More speed less haste.
    • Latin equivalent: Festina lente.
    • Wydawnictwo Naukowe, Państwowe (2000). Inny słownik języka polskiego PWN, Volume 2. Wydawn. Nauk. PWN. p. 228. ISBN 8301128267. 
  • Stara miłość nie rdzewieje.
    • English equivalent: True love never grows old.
    • Jordan, Penny (1996). Stara miłość nie rdzewieje. Harlequin Enterprises. pp. 156. ISBN 8370708919. 
  • Starość, nie radość.
    • English equivalent: Age and poverty are ill to bear.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 177. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Szewc bez butów chodzi.
    • English equivalent: The shoemaker goes barefoot.
    • Meaning: "Working hard for others one may neglect one's own needs or the needs of those closest to him."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 65. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 661. ISBN 0415096243. 

T[edit]

  • Ten się drapie, kogo swędzi.
    • English equivalent: If the shoe fits, wear it.
    • "Your most unhappy customers are your greatest source of learning."
    • Bill Gates, Business @ The Speed of Thought (1999)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 998. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Ten się śmieje, kto się śmieje ostatni
    • English equivalent: he who laughs last, laughs longest.
    • Maciej Dominiczak (2013). Księga Przysłów. 
  • Tonący brzytwy się chwyta
    • English equivalent: A drowning man plucks at a straw.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 33. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Trudno naturę odmienić.
    • English equivalent: What is bred in the bone will not go out of the flesh.
    • "What is innate is not to be eradicated by force of education or self discipline: these may modify the outward manifestations of a man's nature, but not transmute the nature itself."
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations. W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue). p. X. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 985. ISBN 0415096243. 

U[edit]

  • Uwaga! Stary pies szczeka.
    • English equivalent: An old dog barks not in vain.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 55. ISBN 0415160502. Template:Verify source

W[edit]

  • Wchodząc między wrony, krakaj jak i one.
  • Kiedy wszedłeś między wrony, musisz krakać jak i one
    • Translation: When among the crows, caw as the crows do.
    • English Equivalent: When in Rome, do as the Romans do.
    • Kojder, Andrzej (2002). Klimaty korupcji. Centrum im. Adama Smitha & Wydawn. Naukowe Semper. p. 80. ISBN 8386885432. 
  • Więcej ludzi utonęło w kieliszku niż w morzu.
    • English equivalent: Wine has drowned more than the sea.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 864. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Więcej słuchaj, a mniej mów - zawsze szkodzi zbytek słów.
    • English equivalent: Keep your mouth shut and your ears open.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 160. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Wielcy złodzieje małych wieszają.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1086. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Wolno bogatemu biednie żyć.
    • English equivalent: His own desire leads every man.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 977. ISBN 0415096243. 

Z[edit]

  • Z deszczu pod rynnę
    • Word-for-word translation: From rain and under the gutter.
    • English equivalent: Out of the frying pan and into the fire.
    • Meaning: Action to improve situation had made it not better but worse.
    • Kakietek (1999). Phraseological dictionary Polish-English. Energeia. p. 55. ISBN 8385118705. 
  • Z niczego, nic nie będzie.
    • English equivalent: From nothing, nothing will be
    • Meaning: If you don't do anything, nothing will come to you.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 238. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Za dziękuję nic się nie kupuje.
    • Meaning: Your "Thank you" is fine but it will not help me pay my bills. Saying "Thank you" to someone sounds louder if reinforced with money.
    • English equivalent: ?
  • Złej baletnicy przeszkadza rąbek u spódnicy
    • Translation: A bad dancer blames the hem of her skirt.
    • English equivalent: A bad workman always blames his tools.
    • Wydawnictwo Naukowe, Państwowe (2002). Inny słownik języka polskiego PWN, Volym 2. Wydawn. Nauk. PWN. p. 337. ISBN 8301128267. 
  • Żaden w swej sprawie sędzią być nie może.
    • English equivalent: No one can be the judge in his own case.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1038. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Złego początku, zły koniec.
    • English equivalent: A bad beginning makes a bad ending.
    • Meaning: "It is as impossible that a system radically erroneous, once commenced, should end well, as it is that a mathematical problem, commenced wrong, should come out right."
    • Source for meaning: William Henry Porter (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 202. 
    • Emanuel Strauss (1994). "1". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 1. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. 

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