Quotes about Elvis Presley (M–Z)

From Wikiquote
Jump to navigation Jump to search
The last names, or names by which people are best known and whose quotes are included below are arranged alphabetically, for ease of referenceː

M[edit]

  • I used to mime music-making to records before I started formal piano lessons around age nine, but it was seeing Elvis Presley perform on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1957 that really got me excited about playing music. I was totally in love with both Elvis and Bo Diddley, but that wasn't allowed in my house. I wanted to be a guitar player, but they wouldn't allow a guitar in the house. I had to play classical music on the piano, so it took a long time to get somewhere. Eventually, my dad bought me an alto saxophone and I fell into playing sax but before long, rock ‘n’ roll struck as part of the British Invasion, and I reverted to the keyboard.
    • Willie Macalder, Canadian musician, in an article on his induction in the Edmonton Blues Hall of Fame, as published by the Edmonton Journal on May 24, 2018
  • Others get a kick out of Elvis, a passing phase so I recommend the Government feed the souls of men with the music of Beethoven and Dvorak. I never realized that I was so far out of date until I saw this artist on a CBC television production. Heaven help us if that is the way our generation is going...
    • William Ross Macdonald, Senator and the then Leader of the Government in the Senate, commenting, on the record and in January 23 of 1957, about Elvis popularity.
  • But it is Presley's singing, halfway between a western and a rock 'n' roll style, that has sent teenagers into a trance; they like his wailing in a popular song like "Blue Moon" or such western tunes as "I'll Never Let You Go", but they go crazy over the earthy, lusty mood of such rock 'n' roll numbers as "Money Honey"; and the reason is simple enough: Presley sings with a beat; and you can be certain that there'll always be music with a beat and that, whether you like it or not, there will always be an Elvis Presley.
    • Helen MacNamara, Canadian Music writer and book author, writing on Presley's future impact, as published on the June 9, 1956 issue of "Saturday Night Magazine"
  • France's Elvis brought a part of America into our national pantheon. And all of us in France have something of Johnny Hallyday in us.
    • Emmanuel Macron, President of France, on the death of Johnny Hallyday, as published in the Evening Standard on 6 December, 2017.
  • He is probably more famous than anyome who has ever been famous
  • Oh, they can kiss my ass,” she says of critics who might accuse her of borrowing other cultures’ fixtures. It's a topic she seems interested to discuss. “I’m not appropriating anything. I’m inspired and I’m referencing other cultures. That is my right as an artist. They said Elvis Presley stole African-American culture. That’s our job as artists, to turn the world upside down and make everyone feel bewildered and have to rethink everything.”
    • Madonna, in an article by Michael Jacobs entitled "To hell and back, Madonna lives to tell", as published by the Huffington Post on 13 March, 2015.
  • In 1957, I came home from school one day and my mother said she read in the newspaper that Elvis was going to play the arena right near my high school. She didn't want me to go see Elvis. But years later, when the Electric Factory Concerts I then headed booked Elvis at the Spectrum, in 1971, she was the first to ask me for tickets...
    • Larry Magid, founder of Electric Factory Concerts in an interview with Amplify, published in their online edition of October 12, 2017.
  • When Ed made his weekly call to the Trendex ratings service, he confirmed what he had suspected: Allen's show with Elvis had soundly beaten his, garnering a 20.2 rating with a 55.3% share (about 40 million viewers), compared with his own show's 14.8 rating and 39.7 % share (roughly 19 million). Within the week, he called Presley's manager, Colonel Tom Parker. It was time to make a deal. Colonel Parker, knowing he had Ed where he wanted him, extracted a whopping $50,000 for three appearances, far more than any previous Sullivan guest. On September 9, 1956, the camera would pull up at times to show only his upper torso. Yet the limited camera angle didn't dampen the effect —if anything, his facial expression, the abandon on his face, was more potent than even his gyrating hips. This was untamed beatific energy, the definition of charisma, a bolt of white-hot energy. The all-girl cheering section sounded like it was on the verge of storming the stage. Never before had so much female sexual desire been broadcast into so many American living rooms. The evening was a decisive ratings triumph, garnering a 43.7 Trendex rating, an 82.6% share, translating to some sixty million people, or about a third of the country— the largest television audience to date. Indeed, Elvis' performance of “Hound Dog” that night would be one of a small handful of moments that defined the decade.
    • James Maguire, in Chapter 12 of his book "Impresario: The Life and Times of Ed Sullivan, published by Billboard in 2006.
  • In his Grammy-winning 1986 song "Graceland," Paul Simon reveals his thoughts during a road trip to the home of Elvis Presley in Memphis. In the lyrics, Simon states, “For reasons I cannot explain there’s some part of me wants to see Graceland.” Even though I can't list myself as a dedicated fan, I have always appreciated his tremendous talent and the major impact he had on the world of entertainment. Not only his musical talent crossed many genres, but there's no question that he is one of the cultural icons of the 20th century. So once there, we were impressed by the mansion itself, which continues to have the feel of the 1960s-style residence Elvis developed and loved so much. The original 10,266-square-foot Colonial Revival style mansion was built in 1939 for a Memphis socialite and her husband. The expansive surrounding property includes the “Meditation Garden,” containing the graves of the singer, his parents Vernon and Gladys and his grandmother Minnie Presley. So, do we recommend the Graceland experience? The answer is yes, as the house, property and family cemetery are all definitely worth seeing.
    • Jeff Maguire, writing for Inside Ottawa Walley, in an article entitled "Graceland pilgrimage fulfilled longtime wish", as published in their March 27, 2019 edition.
  • Yes, I've known him for his music and films, and indeed he is one of my favourites
    • King Mahendra of Nepal's answer on whether Elvis was one of his favourites, as told after meeting him on the set of "G.I. Blues" and as reported in a May 11, 1960 story by the Los Angeles Times writer Walter Ames.
  • Performing a few more classics like "Crossroads" and "Vincent" from his "American Pie" album, he takes a break between songs to talk about setting off from his hometown for the first time to pursue his music in California and witnessing the the MGM Studio auctions in the late 60's. Moving on, he took a step back in time to "And I Love You So", from his debut album, Tapestry, released in 1970. The song became an instant classic at its release, and was covered by many of the greats including "my favorite", McLean revealed, "Elvis Presley", who recorded it and used it in 125 of his live performances from 1975 until his death in 1977.
    • Shawn Costa, reviewing for Mass Live a performance by singer songwriter Don McLean in Hartfort, CT on October 15, 2016
  • My next book is about how the U.S. Army tried to ‘transform’ itself to meet the challenges of the atomic bomb, as well as the American experiment with a large peacetime, short-service citizen-soldier force and conscription. The idea that someone as famous and controversial as Elvis Presley could be drafted and become a symbol of the U.S. military and the nation's commitment to the defense of the free world fascinates me. His exemplary military service was well chosen, for that young man quietly accepted the call to duty, raised his hand and took the oath, wore the uniform and performed soldierly tasks as well as he had cavorted on the stage before adoring teenyboppers. Thus, after years of unremitting effort, the all-volunteer force that many call “the best Army this or any other nation has ever fielded” has come to face new enemies, new challenges with, if not sublime confidence, at least sturdy resolution. In considering the long hard period of transformation, one ponders the profound commentary of Elvis Presley's first sergeant: “By submitting to the draft and entering the Army as an ordinary private, Elvis accepted the discipline of an institution that had come to play a vital role in transforming men from assorted backgrounds into soldiers and Americans. A condensed version of those lines might stand as a pretty good inscription on the Pelvis’ tombstone.
    • Review of Military historian Brian McAllister Linn book, "Elvis Army, Cold War GIs and the atomic battlefield" (Harvard University Press), as published in the Roanoke Times, on 23 September 2016.
  • In "Clambake", Elvis was going to do a scene in a bar with Shelley Fabares, and in the back these waiters were wearing —you know, the tasseled cup hats and also wearing vests with gold trim and stuff, so I went and put one of those on, as a joke, and then they put a moustache on me. So I'm cleaning up a table, and Elvis is about 5 or 10 feet away from where I'm cleaning, and as he's talking to her, I'm knocking over glasses and finally they said, “Cut!” And he didn't look around —he just kind of shrugged— but I did it purposely three times in a row, and on the third time he turned around and said, ““What the hell are you doing over there? Well, anyways, I did the next take right, and you can spot me back there. He used to called me “Double Trouble,” actually because they did a movie where he was playing cousins and he had to play a blonde, so his Memphis Mafia kept teasing him: “You look like that guy on The Big Valley! So we used to play tricks on each other all the time. He’d be on stage at the International Hotel in Las Vegas, and I’d come off the other side from where he’s leaning down and singing, and I’d get some scarves and bring ’em out, and he’d hear this roaring over there from the other side of the stage, and he’d see me and go, “What the hell are you doing over there?” We'd do stuff like that all the time. We had a good time and yeah, well, Elvis and I were friends. It's too bad he died so young.
    • Lee Majors, in an interview with A.V. Club on Nov 28, 2016
  • Elvis took risks by being a pioneer in his adaptation of black culture. He received huge stick for perpetuating what some of his Southern brethren were referring to as “degenerate nigger music” and the threat it posed to the social order by the fact that blacks and whites were digging his music whether listening to it on the radio or live at (segregated) venues. Much has been made of the way in which he conducted his private life, but this had a lot to do with his living within a kind of fame that few humans could comprehend. So many people often remember how well mannered and humble he appeared to be in his interactions. He may not be ‘The King’ to all but his impact on the course of music history cannot be denied and should not be denigrated.
    • Deyinka Makinde, UK writer, in an article entitled Elvis: Ruminations on Elvis Presley and Black America and published in Acadmia.edu in August of 2004.
  • I always thought that singers have what I call the Elvis Presley syndrome — they think they're Elvis Presley. But they're not Elvis Presley.
    • Yngwie Malmsteen, Swedish guitar player extraordinaire, citing one of the reasons he finally got tired of playing lead guitar for numerous other singers and, thus, in his latest album, decided to sing himself, as published by Blabbermouth on October 18, 2018.
  • Ever since I was a kid, I was just glued to the record player. I would save allowances to buy Elvis records every week and still remember when I first heard "It's Now or Never". I thought that was the greatest rock 'n' roll record I ever heard. It just blew my mind. But it blew my mind even more when my mom showed me it was actually an Italian aria. O Sole Mio, remains a part of my performance repertoire to this day. It was like, 'There you go. There is a connection with all of this music.' It all started from there."
    • Raul Malo, US singer and songwriter of Cuban extraction explaining to Walter Tunis how he became a music aficionado, as published on November 27 at Lex.go.co
  • Other than Sinatra, there are only a handful of people who meant as much to the world of film as they did to the world of music, Bing Crosby, Doris Day and Elvis Presley
    • Leonard Maltin, US film critic and historian, as noted in the preface to the book included with the "Frank Sinatra in Hollywood box set".
  • Since emerging in 2003, Chen has become China's highest-profile fashion photographers. Her work regularly appears on the covers of the Chinese editions of Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, and Elle. She is known for her bold, vibrant style that merges Chinese tradition with high fashion; Gender reversal is a central theme in Chen's work, as seen in a series of portraits, where Chen cast the Chinese actress Fan Bingbing, as various pop culture icons, namely Marilyn Monroe, Che Guevara, Superman, Bruce Lee, and Elvis Presley.
    • About Chen Man, China's top visual artist, as published on February 21, 2018 in Broad Tones in an article entitled "China, Captured: How Chen Man Redefined Fashion"
  • The audience listened attentively as Eric Meola told about the one that got away – a sore spot for every professional photographer. It was catching up with Bruce Springsteen in an airport the day Elvis Presley died. Meola recounted how as he approached, he saw Bruce sitting on some luggage reading a newspaper with the headline proclaiming the end of Elvis. Bruce put the paper down and noticed Meola coming and at that point the moment was gone. "I wasn't about to ask him to recreate it", he said.
    • Michael Mancuso, for True NJ, reporting on how Meola and several other photographers recalled their working for Bruce Springsteen, following a panel discussion held at Princeton University's McCosh Hall, on March 3, 2017.
  • Be like Elvis, go man go
    • Princess Zenani Mandela-Dlamini's words of encouragement to her father, written in an envelope containing a letter sent by her to her father during his time in solitary confinement at Robben Island Prison, as published in the 2018 book entitled 'The Prison Letters of Nelson Mandela'
  • The music of Elvis Presley is very lively and popular, and I am glad to know that you are as fond of his music as I am, too.
    • Nelson Mandela's comment in a handwritten letter dated March 1971, sent to his oldest daughter the now Princess Zenani Mandela-Dlamini from Robben Island Prison and as published in the 2018 book entitled 'The Prison Letters of Nelson Mandela'
  • It was a little painful for me to get involved in the 1968 Special. There were two choreographers already hired by NBC, Claude Thompson and Jaime Rogers and although I had danced for Elvis, I wasn't one of their dancers, nor they knew who I was. But either Elvis, director Steve Binder or Joe Esposito suggested I be allowed to dance, so they assigned me to Jaime's dancers. After an embarrasing start, after all, each choreographer prefers to use their own dancers, things were better for me. I was in a scene which Jaime directed but the NBC censors cut, the bordello scene. Now, on the side Lance Legault and I worked with Elvis on some the dancing sequences and we would sometimes give him advice. He was an amazing listener, and one of the best natural dance movers that I ever worked with. He could do everything, an ability to just feel it from the inside out. But the one thing that stood out in my mind on the set was when I was called over to where the guys all hung out, taking a break. And he was talking, seated while giving a donation to a group of nuns that were on the set. And I am thinking to myself, OK, this man makes a very good living, I would assume but he was taking his five minute break to talk to each one of these nuns, and find out where they were all from. And I was just standing there listening. And that meant so much to me. It was unbelievable experience to watch him give like that. To give money is one thing, but to give of his time, and to give of his soul and to care about where all of these nuns came from, that was just such a highlight and memory for me.
    • Anita Mann Five time Emmy Award recipient, choreographer, dancer and actress, speaking for the Television Academy Foundation on her contribution to Elvis feeling more relaxed on the dancing sequences during the shooting of the 1968 TV special
  • It wag a lead pipe cinch that at the first masquerade party around these parts, some guests were sure to come as Dodger baseball players. Sure enough Harry James, Betty Grable and Mrs. Monte Proser did it first at the "howling" Halloween shindig hosted by Sy Devore and Sol Meadows. Debbie Reynolds was a clown and Eddie Fisher a "teenage" werewolf. Marie McDonald, had no trouble looking like a gorgeous princess on the arm of Harry Karl, her private life prince. Joanne Bradshaw came as "backless" Vikki Dougan. Nat "King" Cole showed up as Elvis Presley, although the original was present. No people in the world love getting dressed up in costume more than actors who spend their lives getting dressed up in a costume for a living, so a large time was had by all.
    • Dorothy Manners, assistant to Louella Parsons, and writing on her behalf about the scene at Sy Davore's Hallowing Party, and published by the King syndication newspapers on November 4, 1957,
  • This was the plan: we would take a holy and sacred picture of Elvis Presley, to the very summit of the earth; once there, we would place it with sincere reverence amongst the chimerical shimmering palaces of ice and snow and then, accompanied by some weird Zen magic, we would light joss sticks, dance about making screechy kung-fu noises, get off our faces, and that would be it: Planet Earth saved. Simple.”
    • Graphic artist Mark Manning, in his book Bad Wisdom, published in 1996.
  • Elvis Presley swam under musical waters where country ballads, New Orleans trumpets and urban and rural blues converged. In the US South, music was not a passtime, rather a way of life, a contradiction which fascinated and transcended the day to day hardships, congregation and the devil's music. Elvis' genious was to absorb it all, then propell the so called rock and roll amalgam into open space, while simultaneouly becoming its only true King
    • Diego A. Manrique, Spanish Music historian, as excerpted from in his book, ‘Mitología, ritos y leyendas del rock’ as published in Alanytics, on 24 November 2021
  • It is difficult to imagine two more dissimilar personalities than Elvis Presley and Mahatma Gandhi. And yet the words of Elvis Presley are strangely close to Gandhi's thinking when he said that he dreamt of an India where he would be able to wipe the last tears of the last child, words reminiscent to what Elvis once said and I quote "I figure all any kid needs is hope and the feeling that he or she belongs. If I could do or say anything that would give some kid that feeling, I would believe I had contributed something to the world"
    • Lalit Mansingh, Indian Ambassador to the US and former Foreign Minister, in his speech as a special guest at the Gandhi Exhibit Inaugural Gala presented by the Indian Community Fund for Greater Memphis, which followed an inauguration ceremony for the exhibit at the National Civil Rights Museum installed for the 35th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King's death, as published at the Commercial Appeal on August 5, 2003.
  • Actually I wouldn't be here in jail if not for those people you call family. They are the ones who put me here. I didn̪'t want to be seen, just be left alone in the desert. But they said, he is our star. I would have gone ahead and let you bleed an Elvis Presley, you could have HIM for your little dreams, not me. I lived in Elvis Presley’s house, man. He ran me out of the yard. I got mad at him, I was going to throw some rocks at him. I never liked him even a little bit, but everybody else always kow-towed to him because he was rich and everything. To me, I don’t give a fuck how rich you are, I’ll just bust you up anyway.
  • I never met him, although I saw his show in Las Vegas, and the great feeling I had after listening to his version of "Somos Novios" ("Its impossible") was always so well known in music circles that the other day I received the main master, in acetate form, from a friend who just passed away. It's without a doubt my most valuable treasure.
    • Armando Manzanero, Mexican singer songwriter's opinion on Elvis and of his having recorded one of his songs "Its impossible", as related in NP25TV 2015
  • While Archbishop Justin Welby has denied statements about Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s secret wedding that took place three days before their publicized royal wedding in 2018, pictures have proven otherwise, showing Welby dressed as Elvis in the secret ceremony, with a quiff that represented the famous rock singer’s hair, sideburns, and shades. Archbishop Welby also held and strummed a red guitar in tribute of Meghan’s love for the late Elvis Presley.
  • He was ahead of his time because he had such deep feelings and had the privilege of deep feelings because he was deeply loved by his mother, Gladys. He was able to appreciate profound beauty in sounds and he started a musical revolution. In fact, they say all revolutions start from love.
    • Imelda Marcos, former First Lady of the Philippines, as published in www.graceland.com
  • If any individual of our time can be said to have changed the world, Elvis Presley is the one. In his wake more than music is different. Nothing and no one looks or sounds the same. His music was the most liberating event of our era because it taught us new possibilities of feeling and perception, new modes of action and appearance, and because it reminded us not only of his greatness, but of our own potential. As to his comeback in 1968, it was the finest music of his life. If ever there was music that bleeds, this was it.The second edition of my book came out after Elvis died, and I was asked to put the whole Elvis chapter in the past tense, and I said no. The reason was that Elvis' presence was so powerful, I felt he's always in the present tense. When you listen to anything that says Elvis Presley to you, whoever you are, whether it's "Long Black Limousine" or "Jailhouse Rock" or "Milkcow Blues Boogie" or "Any Day Now" — I could go on forever — but the physical presence is so strong that death walks away. There's an obscene Elvis outtake of "Stranger in My Hometown". Elvis is singing and suddenly it becomes completely autobiographical, and he explodes — he says "I'm gonna start driving my motherfucking truck again. All them cocksuckers stopped being friendly, but you can't keep a hard prick down." He just goes off, yet it's completely musical, not just breaking down and screaming. He's right there. Every one of his greatest performances is in a way unfinished, because the emotion in them is so rich and so strained, in the best way, trying so hard to say what you mean emotionally, though you can never say everything, so as you listen, you add to that, you're engaged, you're taking part in the dialogue. So that will always be the present tense.
    • Greil Marcus, discussing the 40th anniversary of his book "Mystery Train" in a retrospective interview with Rob Sheffield of RollingStone published in the magazine's online edition on October 19, 2015.
  • Elvis made more girls cry than anyone so the reference ( to flip the script there with a song about making boys cry), was irresistible. It was important that the song could represent empowerment without being divisive, because that's how Elvis was. In fact, I didn't know a lot about him until I visited Graceland recently. Beyond his music, I'm moved by how much he cared for people. I've been telling my friends and fans some of the things I learned about it, and I'm excited that some of them are discovering him for the first time because of my video for ‘Boy Cry.’””
    • Country artist Tegan Marie, in an article published by Forbes on June 29, 2018.
  • Critiques of the Ed Sullivan program assumed that the Presley appeal was strictly telegenic—not vocal. His vocal style, in fact, was every bit as mobile as his hips. Since most of the journalists on the Elvis beat denied him any artistry, his two-and-a-third-octave range was never mentioned and the music itself was rarely analyzed.
    • Author Karal Ann Marling, as noted in her 1996 book, "As Seen on TV: The Visual Culture of Everyday Life in the 1950s (Harvard University Press).
  • i) The biggest thing Elvis had was the command he had on stage, how he could control the crowd and the band. There’s a performance where he does ‘Hound Dog" and at the end he slows it down, and – to me – it looked like an improv moment, not like something they rehearsed. It was like Presley saw girls in the audience freaking out and said to himself: ‘Watch me slow it down – and then really go nuts.’ And he slows it down at the end and then starts his little dance.....ii) impersonating Elvis at the age of four is when I first realized I wanted to become a performer.
    • Bruno Mars, speaking to reporters on his love of Elvis Presley's music, as reported by the AP ii) realitytvworld.com/news/bruno-mars-talks-fashion-e
  • Many artists are taking pictures of Elvis Presley, for example, and flipping them to create various iterations of color or texture. A lot of what Pop-Art has become is solely based on the familiar image and very little behind it. With my work, I want to talk about why Elvis or Audrey Hepburn will live on forever. Icons of mid century American history are still so prevalent today because they had interesting stories and immense talent, not just great marketing skills. Warhol said it best, that everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes. The important aspect is having something positive to say.
    • Pop artist Robert Mars, as published on the Huffington Post on January 12, 2018, in an article entitled "Innovation Over Inundation: The 21st Century's Stand Out Pop-Artist.
  • Elvis Presley was an explorer of vast new landscapes of dream and illusion. He was a man who refused to be told that the best of his dreams would not come true, who refused to be defined by anyone else's perceptions. This is the goal of democracy, the journey on which every American hero sets out. That Elvis made so much of the journey on his own is reason enough to remember him with the honor and love we reserve for the bravest among us. Such men made the only maps we can trust.
  • I don’t know what President Trump’s future holds, but I think Elvis rock ’n’ roll music’s still playin
    • Senator Roger Marshall (R), drawing a comparison between Elvis and former US Pres. Donald Trump, as noted in the Wall Street Journal' s March 4, 2022 edition
  • There are some things — football, particle physics, heavy metal, and constitutional law among them — that I love, but don't love nearly as much as I love the way people love them. Give me a choice between watching the Super Bowl and watching people talk about the Super Bowl for two hours, and I'll always pick the latter: Listen to someone explain their passion, and eventually, they'll show you their soul. But at the very top of this list of loves, there can only be one man, Elvis Presley. I love him, I think to myself as I leave Graceland, as much as I can love a human being I have never truly known. But, maybe more than anything else about him, I love him for the fact that both his presence and his absence created a space for people to come together and try to comprehend the capacity for destruction and redemption, the sheer power, of their love. I love the potential for intimacy and revelation such a space allows. I love that it has lingered long enough for me to find it....
  • I remembered meeting Elvis and he was the one who told me my dad was the king of cool. I'll never forget that.
    • Singer Deana Martin, reflecting on her father Dean's music legacy, encounters and rumors, as published by Fox News on September 23, 2017.
  • I never sang to people. I sang for them, so in 1956, I told that to Elvis Presley. After that he sang not to but for the audience. A subtle difference.
    • Singer Tony Martin as noted in rainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/elvis_presley_2.html
  • After Ann Margret's show, which I had opened for, Elvis came up to see her, they were friends, so there were in a suite and I see this beautiful woman, Priscilla, his wife, coming in, and then I see Elvis, he looks wow, lean, great, so he walks by me, sees me, and says.... "Son you have an oblique sense of humor....
    • Comedian Steve Martin, at the Dave Letterman Show. Years later he wrote a play where Presley, along with Einstein and Picasso, are the main characters, called "Picasso at the Lapin Agile":
  • I idolized Elvis. I sent him so many songs and I never heard word one. Then one day in 1976 I was pitching songs and this famous publisher sat down next to me and says, ‘Layng, do you have a song for Elvis?” There were three I thought might work. Interestingly, the one I was least excited about, the one I almost didn't bother to send in, was the one Elvis chose. The song was "Way Down." Someone in the music industry called me i 1977 to tell me "Way Down" was climbing the charts. I was so excited. Two days later, I got another call, this time from my attorney. She said, "Layng, are you near a television? Elvis Presley is dead. How did this happen?. He listened to my demo of me singing It was just the most impossible thing I've ever heard of. And it still is, that my song would be the last he released as a single.
    • Songwriter Layng Martine Jr., for Forbes and as published on their August 19, 2019 edition.
  • He came in, and they I.D. him. LOL. And he actually left his license at the front while he went in and hung out for a while. I think Rodney still has it.
    • Columnist and producer Alison Martino, daughter of singer Al Martino, recalling the time Elvis went to Rodney Bingenheimer's English Disco at the Sunset Strip, in LA, in an article published in the LA Curb's 21 March 2019 edition.
  • I seldom do, unless I stub my toe.
    • Groucho Marx's zany answer to Roberta Rene, the President of the San Diego Elvis Presley Fan Club, on why Groucho, while debating the merits of Rock & Roll, had yet to mention Elvis, in an episode of "You bet your life" broadcast on Dec 12, 1957
  • Elvis was sort of the first impact on me – his charisma, his performing prowess...
    • Singer and songwriter Richard Marx in an interview with Jim Radenhausen, of Pocono Record, as published on April 29, 2016.
  • If there is one small glimmer of good news, it is that decent, thoughtful and sane voters slightly outnumber the bigots and lunatics. I want to live in an America where that victory is not only mathematical, but political — the America of Walt Whitman's imagination, Elvis Presley's voice and Martin Luther King's oratory.
    • David Masciotra, for Salon, in an article entitled White Flight From Reality: Inside the Racist Panic that Fueled Donald Trump's Victory and published on November 12, 2016.
  • Two months ago scarcely anyone but economists had even heard of mechanism design. Suddenly, it has notoriety worthy of an Elvis Presley ( a man who) somehow manages to attract a huge public following without even trying. Indeed, he can't very well try since he's been dead for 30 years. Yet, isn't it remarkable that, for one week a year, that kind of attention is focused not just on economics, but on physics, chemistry, medicine, and literature. And for that astounding accomplishment, I'd like to express my warmest appreciation to the Nobel Foundation and the Nobel awarding bodies.
    • Eric Maskin, US economist and one of three 2007 Nobel laureate in Economics as stated in his acceptance speech at the Nobel Foundation, in Sweden and as published by nobelprize.org
  • He was an instinctive actor, quite bright, very intelligent, not a punk. In fact, he was very elegant, sedate, refined, and sophisticated.
    • Actor Walter Matthau who co-starred with Elvis in "King Creole," from a 1987 interview
  • Presley's vocal range was exceptional – amazingly so for an untrained singer. It ranged from Low F in the bass register to top B Flat and B in the tenor range. This is over two octaves, when most singers can only manage just over one octave. Quite apart from the range of Presley's voice (and this range remained with him throughout his life, a fact proved by his recordings) the equally surprising thing was that its quality and distinctive timbre remained constant throughout this range. This is also exceptional and quite the most conclusive proof – if any were needed – that Elvis Presley possessed a natural gift for singing which was completely and utterly rare. For if it were not – where are all the other Elvis Presleys?
    • Robert Matthew-Walker, UK classical music writer and composer, describing Elvis' vocal qualities in his book "Heartbreak Hotel: The Life And Music Of Elvis Presley"
  • Throughout the hearing, Mattis was treated to bipartisan praise with Senate Armed Services Committee chairman John McCain announcing at the start that he couldn't be happier that Mattis had been nominated. "I think you're going going to be an extraordinary defense secretary,", Senator Ted Cruz then told Mattis, including a story about how excited his chief of staff, a former Marine, had been when Mattis visited Cruz's office. "If Elvis Presley had walked into the office, he wouldn't have been more thrilled than to see you walk in, General."
    • About General Jim Mattis's confirmation hearings to become Secretary of Defense in 2017, as published in Standard, on January 13, 2017.
  • I wasn't a big fan of him as I only knew him from the Dorsey and Sullivan Shows. But then he won me over when I spent the entire day of the concerts with him, in his dressing room, where he took a lot of his time talking to me and asking me questions about Jazz music and my musical influences. From his part, he said he loved gospel music and the blues the most. I found him to be an earthy kid, a first class gentleman and an exceptional family person.
    • Arni May, Canadian Jazz musician who, at age 20, played drums for the then 22 year old Elvis during his two back to back shows in Ottawa, on April 3, 1957, the latter the result of Canadian union laws obliging foreign entertainers to play with local bands, as told in the Province's August 31, 2015 edition.
  • I found that I could do Elvis's "Jailhouse Rock", and that's the great thing, you could pick it up and in a few hours, you could get to something that make you feel good. (Years later), Freddy wrote "Crazy little thing called love" as a tribute to Elvis, of whom he was very fond of.
    • Brian May, Queen's lead guitarist, detailing some of the riffs that influenced him the most, for the Irish Examiner on November 18, 2016
  • The record industry is fully aware that premature death sells records. After Chester Bennington, the 41-year-old lead singer of the group Linkin Park took his own life, there was a 7,000% surge in the group's music plays. When rock 'n' roll legend Chuck Berry died aged 90, his music sales went through the roof, even though he hadn't released a new album in nearly 40 years. Prince was the top-selling artist of 2016, according to Billboard, outselling every other artist, living or dead, with a total of 7.7 million that year. While in even more notable moments of music history, John Lennon's musical comeback album went on to sell seven million copies in the following six months. But it was Elvis Presley who eclipsed them all. If there was Elvis product in stores following his death, they all got picked clean". In fact, Presley catalogue sales reportedly totalled 200 million copies worldwide in the four months after his passing.
    • Geoff Mayfield, US Billboard's director of charts as published by the Irish Independent on January 20, 2018.
  • Toyota, the Japanese automaker, said yesterday that it would invest $1.3 billion to build its eighth North American assembly plant just outside Tupelo, in northeastern Mississippi. The plant will build the Toyota Highlander, a crossover vehicle, and will employ 2,000 workers. Production is expected to begin in 2010, and reach 150,000 vehicles each year. The decision brings Toyota to an area best known for being the birthplace of Elvis Presley.
    • Micheline Maynard, in an article for the New York Times, entitled "Toyota to Build $1.3 Billion Plant in the Land of Elvis" published a few months after US Pres. George Bush took Prime Minister Junishiro Koizumi (a huge Elvis fan who was also born on a January 8) to Graceland, in Memphis, and on Air Force One, a gesture which may have influenced the Japanese car maker to choose Tupelo as the site of the plant.
  • A rise in the number of outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases has highlighted the growing trend for parents not to have their child vaccinated. Could the activities of a group of teenagers against polio in 1950s America inspire a fresh look at the effectiveness of pro-vaccine public health information campaigns? Well, today, thanks to a 50 year global effort to eradicate polio, only two countries (Afghanistan and Pakistan) remain polio-endemic. It was a very different situation when the Salk vaccine was licensed in 1955. Even in 1957, as many as 30% of people still had no inoculations, and a third of all new cases were in teens, its use threatened in the USA by ‘vaccine hesitancy" And then young people themselves – and Elvis Presley – became the answer to the problem, in what might be the first, largest and most successful case of teen health activism of the time. The fight waged against vaccine noncompliance in 1950s America, he suggests, could provide important lessons for the world today.
    • University of Cambridge historian Dr Stephen Mawdsley, in a film entitled "Teens Against Polio, (released in World Immunization Week, 24-30 April 2016), describing how the activities of a group of teenagers against polio in 1950s America, spearheaded by Presley, if studied carefully, may 60 years later inspire a fresh look at the effectiveness of pro-vaccine public health information campaigns.
  • In our survey the option that most people liked was 'Well-known popular music from any period'. This was closely followed by 'Well-known classical music' and 'Well-known music from the last year'. What do these categories actually mean when it comes to artists? Maybe think of the top 3 as Elvis Presley, Luciano Pavarotti and Katy Perry.
    • Maʐaru̪ rankings, as regards music most liked by waiting telephone callers, as published in an article on December 15, 2018, following a 2018 study by ICM Research,
  • I can still remember when you visited me in my humble home at Beatrice Cottages and we listened to Elvis and sang along and laughed together, then you revealed your soul to me, your dreams, your hopes – and I wrote your first biography...
    • Will Mbanga, in a personal letter asking for the resignation of his former friend and comrade, President Robert Mugabe, a huge Elvis fan whose home in Harare is filled with Elvis memorabilia, and as published in Open Democracy on 25 February 2008.
  • I remember him being tall, slender and so beautiful. I mean, what a beautiful man. And he had this beautiful voice. He was a spiritual guy, and he loved to read anything about being spiritual. He wasn’t so much religious, but spiritual. And I, too, was fascinated by those things. So we bonded over that. We used to exchange books on the set, and it was great fun. We would have conversations all the time about being spiritual. It was a good relationship, very solid. I knew he really wanted to be taken seriously as an actor. He was almost too beautiful to be thought of as serious. It must be very awful to be at the very top like that because nobody could possibly relate to what it’s like to be there and expect you to stay there. He of course embraced it beautifully. But I think he was also pretty lonely and wanted more for himself. He was, of course, very special. But I don’t think he saw himself that way. There was a sadness about him. It just makes you wonder what could have been. I loved Elvis.
    • Diane McBain's laud of Elvis, in an interview with Fox News and published on their May 10, 2022 online edition. .
  • Music, like marketing, is one of those areas of film making that often get overlooked by producer/directors. I know of one who had a budget of USD $1,000,000 and never thought about spending any of that money on music. While this would be problematic for any type of movie, it was particularly bad in that the movie was a biopic about Elvis Presley. After three years, he moved on to other failed projects, but his investor, knowing that he'd poured a lot of money into a movie that can't even be released, eventually broke down and paid Presley's estate significant more money to acquire at least some music royalties for the movie. Since he didn't want to overspend, he ended up purchasing the rights to just one hit song and one “deep cut.” And the producer's brother ended up composing most of the Elvis-esque music for the film...
    • John McCabe, in an article entitled "How to get hold of the perfect music score, legally", as published by Red Shark News on October 19, 2018.
  • As a jazz educated singer I had reservations about entering the Elvis world. There can be a lot of judgement about his music and the image that has been created of him over many years. But I found myself completely falling in love with his songs. Each night on stage I would discover another lyric, another chord change, another nuance that thrilled and moved me all at once. Studying the Elvis songbook, I found breathtaking recordings of the same songs by other artists. I was literally stopped in my tracks. These musical masterpieces were being revealed to me and I had Elvis to thank for it
    • Australian singer and cabaret artist Mel McCaig, explaining the reasoning behind her first solo Adelaide show, "Gifts from the King", in an interview with Broadway World, as published on 25 September 2018.
  • John Lennon said that before Elvis there was nothing. After Elvis, nothing was the same. Perry Como is said to have said that Elvis was a threat to the moral health of the nation. What brighter endorsement could you wish for? Dial him up singing ‘Lonesome Tonight’ and marvel at the shambling majesty even as you ache for what's lost. Another thing about Elvis was that he was the most beautiful man in the world. To be as beautiful as that and also as bad was an alluring combination, love potion and lethal poison. When Pope Paul VI died within a year of Elvis, many of us shrugged. There'd be another Pope along in a minute. But there'd never ever be another Elvis. Dissing the dead Pope while singing hosannas to Elvis's immortality was the pitch-perfect response...-
    • Eamonn McCann in an article for Hotpress entitled "On Elvis, The Undertones and 1,000 issues of Hot Press" , as published on their 1,000 edition, that of October 22, 2019 edition.
  • I am working on several, actually. I've just delivered scripts on George Washington, John Lennon and Yoko Ono and I am also looking at making something on Elvis Presley.
    • Film maker Anthony McCarten's answer as to which historic figures he would wish to next make a biopic of, in an interview published in Telegraph of India's March 15 edition.
  • My earliest memory of music was Elvis Presley when I was four and a half years old. I then reached into my parents album collection, which is very extensive, and pulled out a record of his. From that moment on, in 1992, I really took to the music industry,
    • Jesse McCartney, in an interview with the Setonian published on 19 March,2018
  • i) Elvis was too important and too far above the rest even to mention, so we didn't put him on the list because he was more than merely an artist, he was Elvis. ii). I'm primitive on music. I don't want to learn it, it's too serious, too like homework. And nothing about my childhood inspired me with a love of classical music. My dad was a bit of a jazzer so if a symphony came on the radio he would immediately turn it off. School was no better, you would have just had to play one Elvis record and we would have been hooked. We'd have turned up in droves to that lesson. (In fact) I've got so many vivid memories of being a kid in Liverpool. Like everyone I suppose, I have millions of memories of those days. I remember John and I going up to the airport on our bikes to watch the planes. It makes me smile to think that they named the airport after him. So then I think back to getting the bus with George, going to school. And then the memories go beyond that, to getting the bus to "The Cavern" or the "Grosvenor Ballroom". And then the memories go beyond that and beyond that, and I have to remember that I was one of the guys that all that was happening to. You have to pinch yourself and say ‘did that REALLY happen?’. Did I REALLY meet Elvis?”
    • Paul McCartney, i) In answer to why Elvis Presley was not included on the Sgt Peppers album cover and ii) reminiscing about his early years with the Beatles, as published on the Liverpool Echo's online edition of 24 May, 2015 and as extracted from the book "Conversations with McCartney" by Paul DuNoyer.
  • When I took him to my Frankfurt home for lunch, my wife offered to make him a hamburger, but he wanted a peanut butter and jelly sandwich and then asked for another one..
    • Harold “Gene” McCloskey, a veteran of both the Korean and Vietnam wars who in 2018, was presented with eight medals for his military service that he actually should have received 50 years before, recalling the moment he met Elvis while they were posted in Germany with the 3rd Armored Division,in an article published at the Wellsboro Gazette on November 15, 2018
  • He was a precious gift from God we cherished and loved dearly. He had a God-given talent that he shared with the world and without a doubt, he became most widely acclaimed, capturing the hearts of young and old alike. He was admired not only as an entertainer, but as the great humanitarian that he was for his generosity, and his kind feelings for his fellow man. He revolutionized the field of music and received its highest awards and became a living legend in his own time, earning the respect and love of millions. God saw that he needed some rest and called him home to be with HIM. We miss you, son and daddy. I thank GOD that HE gave us you as our son. Elvis Aaron Presley January 8, 1935-August 16, 1977. Son of Vernon Elvis Presley and Gladys Love Presley and father of Lisa Marie Presley
    • Elvis epitaph as seen on his tombstone, written by *Janelle McComb, and commissioned and directed by Vernon Presley in 1977.
  • He is such a big Elvis Presley fan that he has been known to dress up as Elvis, complete with white silk jumpsuit and black puffed-up wig. At the Parkes Elvis Festival, he had no qualms about being photographed with fellow Elvis fans and then Labor opponent Sam Dastyari
    • About Australia's Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack, as reported by The Australian on February 27, 2018.
  • Elvis Presley. It's a big, all-American icon with a sense of duty...
    • David McCowen, describing what the Grand Cherokee would be, if it were a celebrity, for Drive, as published on 23 October 2016
  • In 1954, R&B̪ writer Charles Singleton and I wrote "Trying to Get to You," which was first recorded by The Eagles, a black vocal group. Elvis Presley heard their version in a store in Memphis, and he decided to record the song. Elvis did it like The Eagles. Amazing how he did that. He wasn't a big star at that point, and we thought that he couldn't sing. We just didn't understand, yet, were grateful to him. Thank God for Elvis.
    • Rose Marie McCoy's laud of Elvis, who recorded a couple of songs she co-wrote with Charles Singleton, and included one of them in his first album, which spent 10 weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard pop charts, as published in NPR̺'s "Lady Writes the bluesː The Life Of Rose McCoy", on February 27, 2009
  • Dylan heard the news while he was at his farm in Minnesota, with his children. I was playing with the kids and planning a birthday party for Samuel Dylan's 9th birthday. Dylan was writing songs for his next album, which turned out to be Street Legal. When Dylan told me that Presley had died, and I said I was not a fan, he didn't talk to me for a week. He really took it bad, was really grieving and said that if it wasn't for Elvis he never would have gotten started. He opened the door, Dylan told me, then went over his whole life, his whole childhood and didn't talk to anyone for a week.
    • Faridi McFree, art teacher for Nobel laureate Bob Dylan's children, on the day and week after Elvis' death, in an interview with NSF, Music Station.
  • Growing up, I could sing every Elvis song. In first or second grade, I'd wrap a scarf around my neck, put a big hibiscus flower in my shirt pocket, and perform Live From Hawaii. He came through Monroe, Louisiana, on one of his last tours, and my mom was going to take me, but I got mumps. When she was getting ready for the show, I was lying on the floor kicking and screaming because I couldn't go. In fact, every artist puts a bit of the King into every performance. We're all just trying to be Elvis, aren't we?
    • Tim McGraw, on his first influence, as published in CMT News online page on July 14, 2016.
  • Swipe to see me attempting a classic Elvis move after the film, and my beautiful, most elegant lady, my number 1 supporter from day 1, screaming like Elvis’ fans in the movie! Wow! What a great movie about a great man and a great crew and story! Thank you and God bless Elvis Presley and his entire family and team ❤️ this is a must watch!
    • Conor McGregor' s laud of Baz Luhrmann's biopic, in an instagram sent on May 25, 2022, from the 2022 Cannes Festival.
  • No, we all started with rock ’n’ roll, Elvis Presley and the whole Sun Records gang. In my case, while riding my bike in '56, I heard “Heartbreak Hotel" and Ii was then that I wanted to play the guitar.
    • Roger McGuinn's answer to the question of whether folk music had been his and the Byrds' first influence, in an interview with Variety, and published on November 6, 2016. He later added more details on the Wall Sreet Journal's edition of September 25, 2018.
  • The headline news of "Platinum", which can be appreciated by fans, scholars, critics and religious fanatics alike, is the inclusion of a newly discovered 1954 demo of the unsigned Elvis singing a lilting wisp of a pop song called "I'll Never Stand in Your Way". His unsophisticated performance is mesmerizing; clearly indebted to the style of the "Ink Spots", Elvis' airy tenor floats delicately above his own guitar accompaniment, aching and somewhat pinched in its feeling; you sense the singer itching to cut loose, to really swing the lyric, open it up; it is in those moments, when the pentimento of the blues vocalist reveals itself, that the melding of styles that soon would change the course of popular music is on fleeting display; it's rare when a single song can be said to make a pricey box-set worthwhile, but this particular "Rosetta stone" of a rare cut, does precisely that. Big time.
    • David McGee, reviewing the platinum box-set for Rolling Stone magazine
  • Man, he was a bada—! Love Elvis, I remember the day he died, riding go-carts at my grandmothers house in west Monroe Louisiana 42 years ago."
    • Tim McGraw, on his instagram, on the occasion of the 42nd anniversary of Elvis' death.
  • Surely there has not been such a pelvis since Elvis Presley was in his prime.
    • Hugh McIlvanney Scottish award-winning sports writer, recalling Diego Maradona's prowess during the 1986 World Cup, which his team won, in an article published in the mail Online's edition of October 1, 2017.
  • When Elvis died 40 years ago next Wednesday, it was like the death of John F. Kennedy 14 years earlier; both men had been such a part of American lives that—for those alive today who remember the events— where they were when they heard the news became almost as important as the news itself. In a way, it made each a part of the story. O was never in the same room with JFK, but I was with the early Elvis. I spent one long Elvis afternoon, during which I watched him perform, then conversed with him and, finally, interacted with him as a part of a group. During much of it, I observed a sweet, unsophisticated young man at close hand. He was exactly what I had expected and yet not at all so.As a writer in the New York bureau of TV Guide magazine, I was invited to attend a press conference, before which I could talk with Elvis and observe him rehearse for his second appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show as well as receive his first polio shot. The afternoon rehearsal was in progress when I took my seat, but the theater was black and strangely silent. Suddenly—shockingly—the stage exploded into red light, dark music and that singular, riveting presence. I don’t even remember the song, though I think it was “Hound Dog.” What I do remember—vividly–is the power of this young performer, the charisma of the man—the mouth, alternatingly pouting, leering, grinning, the sensual modeling of the facial contours and the eyes—those erotic eyes with their kohl-like shadows, promising, threatening. And, of course, the notorious pelvic thrusts. After the rehearsal's end, I joined numerous members of the press to watch the administering of the polio shot, memorable primarily because at the time, and as he later confided to me, Elvis hasd a wholesome fear of needles. It was a scary experience for Elvis, but, as always, he managed a smile for the camera...
    • Author Megan McKinney, recalling her TV Guide assignment on October 28, 1956. She was the only reporter present at the press conference to have personally interviewed him and as a result, been able to acknowledge the immense fear which totally overtook Elvis on that day but that, at the moment of the inoculation, he totally kept to himself and as published in Chicago Classic Magazine on August 16, 2017, in an article entitled My Afternoon with ElvisYoung, Sweet and Oh, So Polite
  • What made the young Elvis an agent provocateur? The leading lunatic theory is that he was a space alien. The more prevailing opinion is that he was a product of the magic medium of his place and time: radio. So let us now praise that great, subversive force in American culture. Radio helped Elvis develop his interest in and affection for the music of black culture. In that pre–rock ’n’ roll era, America was an apartheid nation and in much of the country, black and white didn’t mix. They attended separate schools (with the approval of the U.S. Supreme Court) and they didn’t shop together, worship together or live in the same neighborhoods. Segregation was relatively easy to enforce. It was the law. Elvis was the visible embodiment of a musical revolution. He was an interpretive, not a creative artist. Many musical innovators experimented with blending musical styles, but they all lacked the charisma, the charm, the look…the everything that Elvis had and that he represented. He was a catalyst; his was the face that launched a thousand hips.
    • William McKeen, in an article entitled "What We Talk About When We Talk About Elvis", as published on the History Net's 16 August 2007 edition.
  • I would kiss them both on the mouth.
    • Artist Randall McKissick, known for a decade as the mystery tenant in South Carolina's so-called ‘nightmare’ house, taking about his two idols, Elvis Presley and James Brown in an article published on The State on 17 November 2017.
  • For me, it all started with Elvis. I must've been six, maybe seven years old when I saw him on the Ed Sullivan show, wasn't supposed to be watching, raised as I was in a strict Catholic family, and Elvis the Pelvis was sin. But like most Catholic parents, they watched to see just how sinful Elvis was. He was shot from the waist up, I could see that from my hiding place behind the couch. But Elvis' music and energy ignited my first desire to rock 'n roll. My father was a professional magician with a love of movies, and that's where my childhood creative energies were directed. In fact, through my entire teen life my dream was to be a rock and roll rebel.
    • DirectorTom McLoughlin, former lead singer of the garage band "The Sloths", explaining what first turned into rock music, in an article published in BoeigBoeing's online page, on 17 March 2015
  • Was that the guitar hick?
    • Steve McQueen's frequent phone interjections to Barbara Leigh, who had dated Elvis before he did, as told by Leigh to Marshall Terrill in his book, "The King, McQueen and the love machine"
  • For Presley's evening concert, only 37 of the 259 MPs showed up for the night session in the House of Commons. The rest had gone to see him perform.
    • Earl McRae' explaining why the House of Commons had to cancel their nightly session, in an article for the Ottawa Citizen entiled "Best of Earl: Elvis' birthday" and published on January 07, 2012
  • I decided if I was going to China, I was going to go to Shanghai, I just love that word. What Madrid was for Hemingway and Paris was for Dorothy Parker, I want Shanghai to be my Paris. Next thing I know, I'm in China and the people there are so sweet and they'll do anything for you. At one school, in preparing the students who would be attending Columbia University and due to my association with “The Catcher in the Rye,” I assigned it as reading for students and said the idioms in the story would cause confusion. Another assignment to write about a famous person led to a humorous exchange with a student who asked me to write about “Cat King, King of Cats.” Following some research together, I finally learned who was being referenced. He was talking about Elvis Presley. In China they know him as the Cat King, King of Cats.”
    • Tyson Meade, in an article by Scott Rains entitled "Tyson Meade's journey from Kittens to China to, finally, a home" as published in the Lawton's Constitution June 5, 2020 edition.
  • i) Hanging out with the British Royal Family didn't faze me —I called them all by their first names. In fact the only time I ever got that way was when I met Elvis. He checked out the pre-movie stage version of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, where I played the motorcycle-riding Eddie. I felt like, Oh my god, I can't believe where I am!So Elvis comes up to me and tells me "Well, I hear everyone wants to do an Elvis impersonation [for Eddie] but you didn’t", so the one thing I managed to say to him was, 'No, because there's only one you and only one me...
    • Meatloaf, on being impressed by anyone, as noted in ii) FMTV.ii) Fuse TV.
  • I used to do Elvis at my shows at the Sands, in 1968, before he returned to the stage in 1969, so this guy tells me in a little piece of paper that "He is here" , so when the lights were put on him, it took me about a half hour to catch up with my audience. Later, he would walk in my shows, and the next day, there were lines to see me, because they thought Elvis could do it again, and he did, every night.
  • I'm a very non-religious person. I think everybody has the right to believe in any religion they want. Whatever makes you happy is absolutely fantastic. That's a perfect question to say 'no comment' to, because I don't really wanna hear anybody else's opinion, and I don't think anybody should wanna hear my opinion, because it's very, very personal. And nobody knows anything anyway. So it's, like... If I had to choose a religion, it would be the Elvis Presley religion.
    • Megadeth's lead guitarist Marty Friedman, expressing his views on religion in an interview with the Impact Metal Channel and as published by Blabbermoputh on January 26, 2014.
  • I was lucky enough to see Elvis Presley's opening concert at Madison Square Garden on June 9, 1972. Usually, you are not allowed to bring a camera to a concert. But the audience and the entire event were so wild that no one paid any attention to me. Over the years I watched the footage again and again. Then the Viennale called and I immediately thought of my Elvis material. The only problem was that I didn't know what kind of musical soundtrack to use. I tried everything and was close to giving up when I happened to hear a Viennese waltz on the radio. That was it! What could be better than Elvis and Strauss?
    • Jonas Mekas, Lithuanian artist and filmmaker, on filming Elvis at Madison Square Garden with his Bolex 16 mm movie camera, as told at the Vienna International Film Festival on October 19, 2001.
  • The Biden administration is also doing its vaccine push. The Pentagon is also reportedly looking at plans to mandate that all 1.3 million active- duty troops have vaccine mandates, that they be required to get the shot, just as they already do for actually more than a dozen other diseases and precautions.And the most famous draftee in American history, Elvis Presley, take a look at what we might learn from history. He bared his arm for a vaccine. That was part of helping reassure the public about that over 60 years ago.This is important stuff.We can keep learning together. We can do this togeher
    • Ari Melber, as transcribed from his MSNBC's TV program "The Beat with Ari Melber" when discussing the US Army's mandates vis a vis the 2021 Covid 19 Pandemia, as shown on August 5, 2021
  • He certainly was inspired by black music, but I don't get why people are going after Elvis. If you are going to take the stick out on him, you better take it out on the Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, The Beatles, everybody. If you are going to villify Elvis then why don't you just tear down the whole United States?
    • John Mellencamp, discussing cultural appropriation in an article published by Salon on 19 May, 2018.
  • It was one of just 254 built between 1955 and 1959. The original owner was the German race car driver Hans Stuck, who piloted it to win several hill-climb races in Germany, Austria and Switzerland in 1957. During his ownership, it also won an award at a well-known "automotive beauty" competition and was used in the feature film "Hula-Hopp Conny." In 1959, Elvis bought it from a dealer in Frankfurt, then was given a registration from the U.S. military, which changed every year, resulting in the car getting "lost." After extensive research by both BMW Group Classic and American journalist Jackie Jouret,the car's history started to being verified. Presley had used the 507 between his home in Bad Nauheim to the U.S. Army Base in Friedberg, but when he returned to the US in 1960 he traded it at a Chrysler dealer in New York, which, in turn, sold it to radio moderator Tommy Charles. After outfitting the car with a Chevrolet engine, Charles launched a successful racing career with it, winning a major race in Daytona Beach before selling the car in 1963. The car eventually ended up with space engineer and car collector, Jack Castor. He drove it occasionally before storing it in a pumpkin warehouse with plans to restore it. Though he had collected numerous parts for the car's restoration, it was still in storage when he happened upon a magazine article by Jouret, about Elvis' lost BMW 507! Castor realized that the car he owned had the same chassis number Jouret had uncovered and the pair met at the warehouse to look at the car. Very quickly, Jouret became certain that this car was, indeed, the car owned by Elvis. After further investigation, the car's full history was traced and BMW Group Classic embarked on a 2-year project to restore the BMW 507 to its original condition, you sing many of the parts that Castor had gathered, as well as building a complete 3.2-liter V-8 engine from spare parts to the specifications of the original engine. Today, the 150 horsepower, all-aluminum engine sits under the bonnet of the Feather White BMW 507, and is the star of the Show at the BMW Museum in Munich.
    • Tara Baukus Mello, for Cars Blog, published on 24 September 2016.
  • He was drop dead handsome, a major flirt, and a naturally charming man who was a master of the sexual smile
  • Not only Jane Russell looked lovely in a red dress, but she sang "Ain´t Misbehavin´" and "I´ve Got a Crush on You" quite adequately at St. Jude Hospital benefit show at Russwood Park last night. Danny Thomas master of ceremonies and Elvis Presley, got along well. Backstage it was "Doll Face" that Danny called Elvis, and Elvis called him "Mr. Thomas." Danny went out to Presley´s 18-room manor and personally invited him to appear on the program when he was unable to obtain Presley´s top secret telephone number. The two big hits at the so called Shower of Stars Show were the then reigning Academy Award best actress winner for 1956, Susan Hayward and Elvis who didn´t sing, but pleased the crowd with a nice talk.
    • From the Memphis Press-Scimitar's June 29, 1957 edition, heralding Elvis participation in a Danny Thomas charity show which, thanks to Elvis, attracted 14,000 donors from TN, MS and AR to Russwook Park Stadium on the night of June 28, 1957 in an article entitled "Crowd Goes Wild When Elvis Steps Into Spotlight" By December, sizeable contributions allowed Thomas to seriously undertake the early steps towards St Jude's eventual construction.
  • Elvis Presley remembered a pledge to Memphis charities he made in 1961 after his discharge from the Army and has thus sent checks totaling $105,000 to charities in Memphis, Mississippi, California, Kansas and Nebraska. Thirty-nine charities received checks during ceremonies held at the auditorium of the publisher of both The Commercial Appeal and the Memphis Press-Scimitar. Elvis, who once received aid from The Commercial Appeal-American Legion Christmas Basket Fund, has never forgotten he once was hungry and needy.
    • From the Memphis Press-Scimitar's edition of December 14, 1966. The above mentioned contribution is equivalent after adjustments made for inflation toUS$$783,530.23 in 2016 dollars.
  • I would love to do an Elvis movie one day. That would be amazing znd already got Elvis' iconic hairstyle.
    • Shawn Mendes Canadian singer and songwriter, in an interview with 95-106 Capital FM radio on October 21, 2018
  • i) I'm going to be like him one day............ ii) I like to live life. I certainly work hard for it, and I want to have a good time. Don't deny me that. It might not come again and I want to enjoy myself a little. I liked to sing, I don't know, call it natural gift or whatever, you know, I'm not afraid to say it. It's just I like to sing and then I suddenly realized that I could actually write songs and then make my own music rather than before I would, you know, sort of copy Elvis Presley. iv) Why people like David Bowie and Elvis Presley have been so successful? Because they give their audiences champagne for breakfast? No, because they're what the people want.
    • Freddy Mercury, i) telling his mother what he felt about his future, as he watched Elvis and as recounted by Mrs. Bursara herself, at age 94, for an article published by to Mid Day, on November 21, 2016 ...ii)http://m.imdb.com/name/nm0006198/quotes from Freddy Mercury
  • As I left Princess Diana's funeral service, I was so suddenly struck by the extent of it all that I bottled up all the way home. I was so upset because I really did like Diana, having met with her numerous times. And I always had a laugh with her and really admired her. Most of all, I thought she was so great not to be consumed by everything that had happened to her and to keep giving and giving and giving. I thought she was a really great person – the Elvis of compassion-
    • George Michael, in the second part of an interview with The Mirror's Tony Parsons, in an article published a few months after the death of the former Princess of Wales.
  • He never understood the artistic claims that were made for him, probably thought very little of the nature of his appeal, or his music; yet, as author Greil Marcus points out in "Mystery Train", it is possible to see (all that) as a positive factor; Presley viewed "rock and roll" as for the body, not the mind, so he recorded and performed accordingly; and, if much of his rock music sounds superficial, it was thanks to his undoubted vocal talent and extraordinary charisma that, at least, it was all gloriously superficial and celebratory; he knew better than to take it seriously and, in doing so, he became the consummate rock figure, one that defined its spirit by delighting in its very limitations.
  • I wrestled in Australia, Hong Kong, Japan, South Africa, North America and Mexico. My name, it was like Elvis...
    • Mario Milano, in a 2009 interview, as published in an article entitled "Pro wrestling great Mario Milano - ‘Australia’s Elvis’ - dies at 81" by the Post and Courier's edition of December 17, 2016.
  • I was enchanted by the story my mother, an aspiring singer, told me of meeting Elvis in the early days of his career after witnessing him bring down the house at a live broadcast of "Louisiana Hayride". According to her, Elvis was polite, courteous and unassuming, addressed her as "ma'am," shook her hand and thanked her for enjoying the show. I am elated as his now regained role as an unparalleled musician and cultural innovator.
    • Ben Miles, in a letter to the Editor of the Los Angeles Times published on 18 April, 2018 in connection with the newspaper's very positive review of the HBO documentary Elvis Presley: The Searcher.
  • But it was on the gospel numbers, such as the stunning "How great thou art", (1977) that Presley showed the awesome power of his voice. The fact that he has one of the greatest voices in popular music has been obscured by the mystique that has surrounded him.
    • Steve Millburgh, writing for the "Omaha World Herald", on one of Presley`s last concerts, on 19 June 1977.
  • After about an hour a few of the guys walked out of the huge room and the others kept talking to me. And I'm assuming now when I think back that the ones that left went to Elvis and probably told him that I was OK. So as I was talking to the other guys, literally without turning my head or looking to any side, that was when I felt this huge, huge presence. It's completely unexplainable and I felt this energy and I turned to my right and I looked and there standing in the doorway was Elvis Presley. And he was not the Elvis that you would imagine. He had on a simple blue sweatsuit with white stripes down the side of the arms and a little white tennis hat on. He just looked like a guy that was lounging in his house, relaxing with his buddies. And that's the Elvis that I met, no jeans, no T-shirt, no sweater, not one of his big blouse shirts or anything like that- just very normal. I stayed that night until 7 o'clock the next morning. He put on a karate exhibit for me with Sonny and Red West and he had the guys call The Bodhi Tree -and they got me all the spiritual books and brought them over in the middle of the night from the store because he realized I was very spiritual and that we would have that in common.
    • Mindi Miller, actress and stuntwoman, recalling the moment she finally met Elvis at his Monovale Drive home, in Bel-Air, CA, in early 1975, as told to EIN's online page on 12 April, 2017.
  • My dad was riding down Sunset Boulevard on his motorcycle when suddenly, a limo pulled up next to him. The driver rolls down his window and says, 'Sir, I have Elvis Presley in the car and he'd like to meet you. After they had spent some time together, dad began to exit the limo when Presley stopped him with a surprise request: his autograph!!!
    • Roger Miller's son Dean, as told in a Children of Song podcast, on 28 January, 2018
  • Our culture includes Elvis Presley, Jimmy Stewart, John Wayne, Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby, Johnny Cash, Jackie Wilson, Theodore Roosevelt, Douglas Macarthur, Milton Friedman, Edgar Allen Poe, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Thomas Edison and again, for emphasis, Elvis Presley.....
    • Stephen Miller, at a political rally on May 25, 2016 at Anaheim, CA, on the subject of how best to define and defend American culture.
  • In the eleventh grade Elvis and I were in Miss Thompson's Civics class. He was a class clown and in the middle of our mid-term exams with everyone concentrating on the test, he called from the back of the room in a loud voice “Miss Thompson, Miss Thompson,” “What Elvis?” she answered. Then he asked “Why did the chicken cross the road?” The whole class broke up laughing except, of course, Miss Thompson. She quickly replied “See me after class, Elvis"
    • Robert Wayne Millican, who net Elvis in 1948 as a freshman at Humes.
  • My sister could sing opera if she wanted, and we used to sing duets together like the Ponselle Sisters, and I also enjoy classic Bette Midler, Barbara Streisand, Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby and Judy Garland. Of today's voices, Madonna, Mary J. Blige -- people who know how to communicate--. And I love Elvis Presley. Quite a nice mix!".
    • Top US soprano Aprile Millo, when asked by the Playbill staff to name her favourite female and male non-classical singers, as published in Playbill, on 17 November, 2009.
  • But she got her own back because when she got a little bit older, she dated Elvis Presley, who I was madly in love with, of course, as was everybody at the time. So I think that kind of compensated for it being the "back of a head" in the film.
    • Hayley Mills, discussing her time with Susan Henning who was 14 years old, as she was, and her body double in Disney's 1961 blockbuster "The Parent Trap", as noted in an article published in the August 27, 2021 edition of the Showbiz Cheat Sheet.
  • Rock and roll is that center place between country and blues and R&B and gospel. When I think of rock and roll, the first person I think of is Elvis Presley. And yeah, he did ‘Jailhouse Rock,’ but he also did those crazy tender ballads. To me, that's still rock and roll.”
    • Parker Millsap, singer-songwriter in an article entitled "When the spirit moves Parker Millsap, anything can happen", as published on the Boston Globe on May 18, 2018
  • And he came from East Tupelo, jumping at all of us, a carnal, metallic hero shamelessly imitated, a glorious founder. Even today it seems like I remember everything about him, especially how he defined the myth and monument of the culture of contemporary expressionism. He invented everything and led a ship which we could all board, and led many to sing everything when all we would have done without him is sing boleros. He was rock and roll, is today and shall always be tomorrow. God bless Elvis Presley.
    • Mina, legendary Italian singer as inscribed in Presley's italian Fan Club online page.
  • Elvis loved karate and his moves on stage, in the 70s, were karate inspired. One day in 1971 he went to see my show, then invited me to go see his at the International, so on the way there, at the elevator, I found myself in the company of Alice Cooper, Chubby Checker and the most popular porn star at that time, Linda Lovelace, all of whom were also invited by Elvis. So there we were in the biggest suite in Las Vegas, waiting for him to greet us when he finally came out, but dressed in a karate gi. He did a couple of moves until, out of nowhere, another man jumped in front of us, like the butler in the Pink Panther movie who comes our of the closet and attacks his master and I said.. Gee, that's great!!!
    • Liza Minelli, telling Graham Norton how and when and with whom she met Elvis.
  • At his big New Year's Eve party, I got to sit and talk with him and it was just great. He was the voice of my generation and I had a million questions to ask him, but all he wanted was to talk about that session of 'Kentucky Rain,'. "More thunder on the piano, Milsap,' he had said when we recorded it. I then asked him if he would like to get up and sing and added that we knew all his songs. 'No, I want to sit here with my friends and not have to worry about singing". He knew we did know how to play his songs, and all, but he didn't want to get up and sing and that was fine with me. It was his party.
    • Ronnie Mislap C&W musician, blind since birth, who played píano on Presley's "Kentucky Rain", as told to Rolling Stone Country, and published on www.theboot.com on December 8, 2014.
  • Lesson #1 is that rock music is in the fighting spirit, not in the amperage of the guitars; indeed, some of the toughest rocking has come from all, or mostly acoustic bands; Elvis presented a primer lesson from the famous Sun sessions, with a simple blues song through the most famous faux false start in rock history; he and the boys start out all slow and bluesy, before stopping the band cold and calling it out like the hippest beat poet: 'Hold it fellas. That don't... move me. Let's get real, real gone for a change'. Then they did, let it loose, turned every bit of intensity in their beings into a jumping arrangement, much faster and more rhythmically nuanced a performance than the opening. Much of the intensity is in the fast and furious, but precisely laid out detail work; there is a strong sense of spontaneity and discovery, but what ultimately makes this a hall-of-fame performance is the vocal performance; Elvis doing tricks, making sudden octave wide jumps. "If you see my milkcow..." There is a charismatic determination of spirit that Nietzsche would no doubt have recognized as the will to power; when the King got through with it, it was no longer anything to do with a high calcium drink, but about the singer's assertion of his place in the universe.
    • Review of "Milkcow Blues" (1954), Elvis third single for the Sun Records Label, by MoreThings.com
  • My parents brought home Elvis Presley's "Hound Dog" and I would sit there, on my stomach, with my face right at this little record player, playing that song over and over and over. I didn't know what Elvis looked like, what any of this was about, all I knew was there was some kind of groove and energy coming off it. That is when I lost interest in playing Kick the Can or Red Rover with the neighbourhood kids and with a gift of his first guitar, I became a bit of a withdrawn kid who loved being at home strumming my guitar.”
    • Canadian rocker Kim Mitchell, as published in the Intelligencer, on November 4, 2017.
  • Actually my dad saw Elvis before he was well known. In mid November of 1954, he and mom were down in New Orleans staying with Frank and Isabell Monteleone, who owned the Monteleone Hotel in the French Quarter in New Orleans. On the weekend, they went to their place in Pass Christian, Mississippi. The Monteleones said, “There’s a little club about a half hour from here. They’ve got this singer there, and we ought to go up and see him.” Then, after seeing him and when my dad was preparing his original written story of "Thunder Road", he wanted Elvis to play his younger brother Robin Doolin. In 1957, my parents as usual had a Christmas party, and they invited Elvis to discuss the matter. My mom served us some delicious roast beef and I remember at the end of the party and after everybody had left, my dad and Elvis were at the piano taking turns playing and singing songs. My dad loved jazz and knew a lot of Southern jazz songs. Dad would be like, “Do you know this one?” I sat there half the night listening to them. At 13 years old, I knew who Elvis Presley was. It was something. Elvis wanted to play the part, but his manager Colonel Parker claimed that Elvis had too many obligations to fulfill and too many film contracts already pending to take on my dad's project. But I think the real problem was that Parker was unhappy that someone had gotten straight to Elvis without going through him...
    • Chris Mitchum, in an interview with Medium Corporation dealing with his father, actor and producer Robert Mitchum's wishes to give Elvis the role of his younger brother in the 1958 classic "Thunder Road"
  • I never saw him off the set, but twice, and yet I considered him one of the best friends. A real southern gentleman he was. One of the nicest persons I have ever met in my entire life.
    • Mary Ann Mobley, who co-starred with Elvis in two films, in an interview with Joan Rivers, in 1992
  • Elvis had an open time period, and I think Colonel Parker remembered all the fan mail that kids wrote from Hawaii. So to fill that one date that they needed, they decided to come, and that's why he came to in November of 1957
    • Tom Moffatt, Hawaii's foremost concert promoter, recalling the root of Elvis' first performance there, which took place 17 months before it became the 50th state.
  • I never met him until I was in a rehearsal, in 1969, and he just walked up one time – I'd worked with him with the Sweets for 6 months I think – and he said, "Hey Stump – how you doin?" and shook my hand. I was shocked, because I didn't know that the man knew my name & stuff. You know, Rick Nelson was really good looking but he couldn't touch EP. I mean that man Elvis was something else! When I first saw him – I'm not gay at all – I thought man – this man is really cool neat cat, man! Anyways, i was with him in August of 1974 when he, Jerry and Red painted a female figure drawn into a mural located in the west wall of the Showroom Internationale, as if she was black. They waited until 3 am, got some ladders and black paint, and Elvis did the painting.
    • Jerome Stump Monroe, R&B drummer for the Sweet Inspirations, as told to Richard Crofts and Arjan Deelen in an interview for YouTube, dated 31 May 2018.
  • He's all for love and who else can give you this? Elvis Presley for President!
    • Lou Monte's words heard in RCA's "Elvis Presley For President" single from the summer of 1956. In that year's otherwise inconsequential Presidential election, no less than 5000 people, by write-in, voted Elvis...
  • Frankly speaking, I don't know much about rock and roll music and I enjoyed some when I was in high school and college. But I stopped listening after Elvis Presley...
    • Ban Ki-moon, eight Secretary General of the United Nations, a national of South Korea, as noted in brainy quote/quotes/keywords/elvis_presley.html
  • To me Elvis Presley's best records came after he got out of the Army. I mean, just his delivery. “Are You Lonesome Tonight,” and “Surrender” and “Little Sister,” “His Latest Flame,” “She’s Not You,” even some of the early movie songs like “Follow That Dream” and “King Of The Whole Wide World” that I list among my all-time favorites. But, rock ‘n’ roll purists think that after 1957 there isn't anything any good. I think this is so far off base it's laughable.
    • Craig Moore, in an interview with singer Bobby Vee as published by Goldmine on May 14, 2009
  • Elvis gave us a second career'.In his beginnings, he told us he had always enjoyed singing `Precious Lord Take My Hand." That was one of his favorite songs
    • Bluesman, the Reverend Bishop Dwight Arnold Gatemouth Moore, speaking about the impact of the early Elvis Presley on African American musicians, as quoted by Robert Gordon, for Elsewhere, on November 7, 2007.
  • It hosted presidents and one king — Elvis Presley in 1955,”.
    • George Moore, the Mobile Alabama Battle House Hotel's historian, referring to celebrities which stayed there, including Elvis, who did so after a concert at Ladd Stadium, in an article by Marci DeWolf, entitled "Mardi Gras in Mobile a family affair", and published in January 29, 2018.
  • He was pioneer of doing a little bit iof everything, a triple threat, so yes I am following on his footsteps.
  • I thought anyone who had been the center of all that insanity for so long would have some of it rub off on him. But, after working in "Change of Habit" with him, I realized I'd never worked with a more gentlemanly, kinder man. He was gorgeous.
  • Dot continued to travel between Britain and America when I was out there, in between her tours and engagements. In Los Angeles, she once appeared at the 'Moulin Rouge' club in Hollywood, one of her biggest fans being a young Elvis Presley, who attended most of her performances and repeatedly asked her to sing 'This Is My Mother's Day!' He came backstage and, being very nervous, introduced himself to me – as though I didn't know who he was.'Hello, I'm Roger,' I said.'How are you, sir?' he asked.'Lovely to meet you, sir.' He insisted on calling me 'sir' throughout our chat, and acted as though he was in awe of me. Him! In awe of me! Elvis then told Dot how much he admired her and hoped he might have just a little of the success she had achieved. If only he knew. If only I knew!
    • Roger Moore, recounting the time he and his first wife, entertainer Dorothy (Dot) Squires met Elvis (page 135 of his autobiography)
  • Sam Phillips used what we call 'slapback' or 'tape delay', which lent an otherworldly patina to Presley's voice. And I don't know if Sam was really conscious of it at the time, but if you listen to old pop and country records back then, the voice was always so much farther out from the music; Sam kept Elvis' voice close to the music, so, in essence, Elvis' voice became another instrument.
    • Scotty Moore, Elvis Presley's lead guitarist from 1954 until 1968, as published in The "Virginia Pilot", in an article entitled "The rising of Sun Records cast music in new light", as written by Sue Smallwood, and published on December 15, 1994
  • i) My delight in dating Elvis hinged entirely on one fact. I knew that no one could possibly make Marlon Brando more jealous. I wanted to get even, Brando had done me wrong, so I went from one kind of king to another. I dated Elvis, who was absolutely gorgeous and had a perfect kind of face, but he was not interesting to me. When Brando saw a photo of us two, in the papers, he was furious, he threw chairs, It was wonderful. ii) When he took the polio vaccine, he was wonderful, a fabulous and important advocacy which should continue to work with today's celebrities vis a vis teh COVID 19 pandemia.
    • Rita Moreno i) in her Memoirs ii) interview with Dr. Jon LaPook CBS this morning July 20, 2021 Note: Not a single photo of Elvis and Rita has ever been found, which points to her having told Brando about her affair with Elvis, which had indeed taken 2 years before, as if it was happening then and to make matters worse, on the day Brando told her he had just met Presley at the Paramount Commissary, and had found him very congenial....
  • Elvis, yes! Elvis was my man. You know, I used to go up and view his shows.
    • Derrick Morgan, known as the precursor to Bob Marley, the first big reggae star in early 1960s in an interview reaggeavibes
  • I never met a more polite kid in my life.
    • Actor Harry Morgan, who co-starred with Elvis, who was 31 years old,in United Artists' Frankie and Johnny", in an interview with EMMYTVLEGENDS
  • Just pretend everyone in the audience is sitting there in their underwear.
    • Advice given to Elvis by Bobby Morris, the then brand new orchestra conductor of the Showroom Internationale at the International Hotel in Las Vegas, on the night of July 31, 1969, as Elvis became a little trepidatious minutes before the start of his first show in 9 years. As told by his son Daryl Morris in an interview with the Las Vegas Review Journal published on May 5, 2018. Morris would remain his conductor for the next engagement only, replaced as he was in the summer of 1970 by Joe Guercio & his orchestra.
  • It probably will require a hurricane to de-contaminate this area properly after hix appearance here. I know hundreds, and there must be thousands, who deplore the type of music that is being fed to the younger elements of our community. Let us hope that those who feel as do will make themselves heard so that something may be done to curb the mouthings of that avaricious maniac.
    • ̇ W.A. Morris, commentimg on Elvis' performance at The Citadel 's College Park, in Charleston, SC, on June 28, 1956 in a letter to the Editor of The News and Courier published on July 3, 1956.
  • As a musician, I was inspired by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Elvis Presley, Beethoven and Chopin and so I will always be the same Michele, but with different moods. We are going to have a lot of rough and strong things but a lot of emotion, too. As far as the lyrics are concerned, it will be more mature.
    • Michele Morrone, italian actor and singer in an article entitled "Racism should be dealt with seriously", as published in the hindustantimes' August 2, 2020 edition,
  • We have a mutual friend who uses the phrase "That’s skinny Elvis", all day long when describing something cool
    • Sam Morrow, telling Rolling Stone how his duet with Jaime Wyatt on the song "Skinny Elvis" came about, as published on March 26,2018.
  • They did a survey not too long ago about how many people believe Elvis is really dead. And if I remember correctly, it was around 20 percent thought it was some government plot, that Elvis was still alive somewhere, and the government was served well by promoting the idea that he died when he was still alive. And I like Elvis. But I’m pretty sure he’s dead
    • Mike Moser, a Nebraska Senator who got COVID-19 before vaccines were available, explaining to the Legislature how sometimes polls are not to be given much credibility, as noted in an article entitled "Vaccine Exemption Bill Advances; Income Tax Debate Starts", and which was in Nebraska's Public Media's February 16, 2022 edition
  • The 2019 arrival of a new BMW 3 Series as an event that resets the parameters of the executive car class, because every time a new one comes along, it usually succeeds in smashing its key rivals and becoming the car to beat. It is as momentous in the motoring world as the Apollo moon landings or the death of Elvis.
    • Darren Moss, reviewing the new BMW Series 3, as published in What Car?' May 23 2109 edition.
  • Representing Elvis is something only dreams are made of...
    • Super model Kate Moss, speaking about her appearing in a video filmed at the Abbey Road Studios in London, in connection with the re-release of the song "The Wonder of you", which had topped the UK singles charts for 6 weeks in 1970, and again hit the Top Five, at #4, in 2007, as reported by the Sun on 29 November 2016.
  • I have to say I had some very good scenes with him in "Loving you", but I found myself going to every shot, every scene in which he sang because I was completely taken by listening to him sing. I could not believe the charisma. Incidentally, my uncle was the opera star Mario Lanza (married to my dad´s sister Betty) and I knew what it was like to encounter not just an actor or a singer, but somebody that you knew was going to be a legend. Mario was going to be the next Caruso and Elvis, I thought, ´he is in that class´. This man is going to live forever because that voice is not just for us, but for the people of God.
    • Rev. Mother Dolores, formerly actress Dolores Hart, speaking about Presley´s voice, in an interview to Sirius Radio, in Memphis, TN, on the 36th anniversary of Presley´s death (August 16, 2013).
  • I've been an Elvis fan all my life. It started in 1957, but regrettably, I never met him.
    • Nana Mouskouri, Greece's leading music star, in an interview with Telescoup, as published on their online page on September 30, 2018.
  • I don't admire nobody, but Elvis Presley was the sweetest, most humble and nicest man you'd want to know. Singing ability, he a had everything and he was pretty, I know. And when it comes to boxing nobody has the class, the style, the wit, the speed and beauty of Ali. When it comes to singing nobody had everything like Elvis. And the last thing, he did lot for poor people, he cared for people, he had a good heart, he just wasn't a person who was great with talent but great in spirit and with God in his heart, and this is great too. I realise how good I am in my profession, I don't praise nobody if he don't deserve it, cos I am the greatest of all time in boxing, in boxing. I said boxing! I'm telling you, not just you all, the Elvis fans, so naturally you praise Elvis, he's of European race as you are, but I'm black, I'm a Islamic, I'm 100% different from you. And I tell the world Elvis was the greatest of all time. I'm a Muslim who's black who stands up for what he believes. I don't have to say what I don't feel, I'm not false I don't have to say this. I'm free. He to me is one of the greatest singers, actors and all round men of all time. With all the brothers together, none are better than Elvis Presley
    • Muhammad Ali, as published in numerous magazines and biographies, including Saladin Ahmens's online page, as well as from a speech in Memphis, TN, honouring Elvis life on the 8th anniversary of his passing (August 16th 1985, https://www.youtube.com/watch?
  • A day for people to reflect about the things that were most important to my father, like self-love and self-respecy. My father loved children, so in some way, developing around them through the school curriculum. I think the "Ali Center" is just terrific to always mention and something called "ighters Heaven in Deer Lake", Pennsylvania, where my father trained for all of his big fights, and where he lived in between his fights. The Beatles photograph, the famous Michael Jackson photograph, the Elvis Presley photographs were all taken there. It’s been totally reconditioned into its original state; so along with preserving my father’s legacy through Muhammad Ali Day, I know from my own family how important it is to create these centers to connect with the community to house all the core values of my father and what was important to him.
    • Khaliah Ali, Muhammad Ali's fifth daughter, on how she would want "Ali Day" to be celebrated and his legacy to live on, as noted in an interview published in the Chicago Tribune's January 17, 2022 edition
  • The board meets every Wednesday at the old courthouse in Inverness. Last week I walked into the old courthouse and there was a portrait of Elvis Presley on the wall, greeting me. “Good morning,” I said to Elvis as I entered the building.I did a double take because he appeared to wink at me. Later in the meeting we had a visit from Paul Perregaux, a Citrus Hills resident who has qualified to run for the Citrus County Community Charitable Foundation board, the nonprofit organization that will decide how the proceeds from the lease of Citrus Memorial Hospital will be used. I asked Paul to give us some background on his life experience so we could let residents know why he was running for the office. The longtime banker pointed out that he had an Army career before he worked for the financial industry in New England and noted he was once assigned a driver by the name of Elvis Presley. And yes, it was that Elvis Presley. “He was a very nice young man” said Paul.Later that same day, back at the Chronicle office in Meadowcrest, we had a very extraordinary visit from April Royal, the widow of Phil Royal I sat for a few minutes with April and as we sat there talking, April Royal explained to me that her recently deceased friend Dorothy Jean's absolute favorite musician was Elvis Presley. Her residence at the Key Center was adorned with photos and paintings of Elvis.In July of this year, April and Phil attended the Key Center's annual auction. Phil had been on the Key Center board for 20 years and had a special relationship with Dorothy Jean Cole.At the July charity event, what comes up for auction but a large velvet portrait of Elvis Presley? According to April, Phil took one look at Elvis and said he needed to purchase the velvet masterpiece for Dorothy Jean. “I don’t care what it costs,” Phil told April. “We need to buy Elvis.” The Royals were the top bidders. Phil wanted to wait until after the Run for the Money to give the present to Dorothy, but fate got in the way. Phil died during the run at a very young 47 years old. His family and our entire community have been rocked by the tragedy. April Royal has been an incredibly strong woman during the aftermath of the tragic events. Just last week she saw the Elvis portrait at her home and decided she had to go visit Dorothy Jean. So she loaded Brelyn and Elvis into the car and went to the Key.She presented the Elvis portrait to Dorothy as a last gift from Phil. Dorothy was delighted to spend time holding Brelyn and she had a big smile on her face.And now, just a few days after that visit, Dorothy Jean Cole has passed away.The irony was almost too much to comprehend.In a very strange way, the velvet King helped me better understand what courage looks like.
    • Gerry Mulligan. Publisher of the Citrus County Chronicle, published on October 1, 2016 at 11:45 pm
  • I used to babysit for a Sergeant Phelps at the US airbase and was at work one day when he turned up at my house and told my mum that Elvis would be at the airbase that night and I should go if I wanted to see him. My mum ran to a phone box to call me at work. I couldn't believe it – I loved Elvis, I had all his records. I changed into my American jeans, lumberjacket, bobby socks and blue suede shoes and cycled the three miles to the airport base. I dropped in at my friend Muriel's and she said she would come too but I couldn't manage to give her a ‘backie’ so we skipped and ran all the way. When we got to the base there was a small group of people already there, standing at the barrier in front of two huge Cadillac cars. Muriel and I were right at the barrier, were so excited and suddenly the plane was in front of us. The door opened and there was Elvis. He was so handsome in his uniform. He waved and we started screaming. He shouted: ‘Where am I?’ and people shouted back: ‘Prestwick’. Elvis came down the stairs and looked fantastic with that beautiful smile. We could nearly touch him. Then Muriel did an amazing thing. She jumped over the barrier and threw herself on him – a couple of huge military policemen scraped her off and put her back over the barrier. The next thing we knew, he was away. We went to the cafe where the young folk hung out and told people we had seen Elvis. They were all laughing at us but the papers the next day proved it.”
    • Ann Murphy, on the night she and her friend saw Elvis on his only hour in Scotland, March 3, 1960, travelling as he was en route to New York, on the day of his final discharge from the US Army, as published on the Scotsman, on 3 March 2006.
  • That’s my idol, Elvis Presley. If you went to my house, you’d see pictures all over of Elvis. He’s just the greatest entertainer that ever lived. And I think it’s because he had such presence. When Elvis walked into a room, Elvis Presley was in the f***ing room. I don’t give a f*** who was in the room with him, Bogart, Marilyn Monroe.”
  • In fact, the overwhelming influx of white rappers has become so pervasive that hip-hop queen Nicki Minaj offered a tongue-in-cheek Instagram observation on the trend: “It’s a great time to be a white rapper in America huh?” Nicki also came with receipts — a screenshot of the iTunes Top 10 Rap/Hip-Hop songs displaying six slots filled with Caucasian spitters: the aforementioned Malone and G-Eazy as well as NF, Macklemore, Machine Gun Kelly and a certain gifted-yet-weary rhyme legend (Eminem), who is most responsible for flipping hip-hop's racial course as Elvis Presley once did with the Black musical art form known as rock and roll.
    • Keith Murphy, as published on the BET network online page on December 19,2017 in an article entitled "Now Is A Good Time To Be A White Rapper for everyone except Eminem". The statement is reminiscent of Chuck D's reconsidered opinion on Elvis when in an interview with ABC-TV, in 2002, he stated: "As a musicologist — and I consider myself one — there was always a great deal of respect for Elvis, especially during his Sun sessions. As a black people, we all knew that. In fact, Eminem is the new Elvis because, number one, he had the respect for black music that Elvis had"
  • I named this huge dinosaur Elvis inter'alia, because of its uniqueness and Pristine Pelvis.
    • Nate Murphy, the Curator of Paleontology at the Phillips County Museum in Malta Montana, on the reason he named the 32-foot Brachylophosaurusn, Elvis, as noted in the June 27, 2005 issue of Newsweek
  • But things began to change in late October 1957, thanks to Elvis announcing the impending arrival of “a rock ’n’ roll Christmas.” The setting was a San Francisco press conference and the reference pertained to the imminent release of Elvis’ Christmas Album. Unsurprisingly, the media took the bait, waxing indignantly about the desecration of Christmas music. Even Time magazine got into the act. At the height of its influence, the magazine did one of its trademark putdowns, warning of the “most serious menace to Christmas since I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus.”
    • Pat Murphy, for Troy Media, in an article dated December 19, 2018 and entitled "The first rock ’n’ roll Christmas", his reference to TIME dovetaling nicely (LOL) with the not so well known fact that TIME, in part thanks to the Luce Family, remains to this day the only major US based magazine to have never had Elvis Presley grace its cover.
  • It's now or never, as Elvis Presley used to say.
    • NJ's Governor Phil Murphy's answer to a question by a reporter on when should the vote be held for the legalization of marijuana, as published by CBS Philly's March 21, 2019 online edition.
  • I was the twenty-seventh person on standby, on the last flight out of New York City to Memphis the night before the funeral. Miraculously, I got to Memphis and took a cab to Graceland- They'd stopped letting people into the house at that point but everybody was trying to get a photograph of Elvis in the casket, and there was a $50,000 bounty on it.. But the actual funeral was a spectacular thing. I still have incredibly powerful impressions of it, to drive the route and see all the hundreds of thousands of people waiting for him to roll by. It was incredible—very powerful and was about 90 degrees. Waiting in the shade, and all the signs said "God bless you, Elvis. When the hearse rolled out on the street, and it reached the speed it was going to go at, I burst into tears. It was like the long, slow walk And it was just so poignant, then all the helicopters converged on the cemetery, overhead, and there was a riot at the other gate, you know, at the back gate—people were trying to storm into the cemetery. The hearse was arriving, and I started racing, running from where we were. We started running towards where I thought the riot was coming from. On the way I encountered the hearse being led by 24 motorcycle cops. It was one of the most terrifying things I have ever seen, because these cops they were guarding Elvis. And all of the sudden there was one man standing in the cemetery right where they were passing by, and there was not supposed to be anybody there. There's one guy, and it's me. And this cop gave me a look that said, "If you move, I will shoot you right through the heart." I mean, I just froze—you know, like when your hair stands on end. Anyway, as they tried to carry it up the steps, they almost dropped it—it fell like sideways. But then there was a very strange moment when Priscilla actually left. Because you could feel Elvis. You could absolutely feel his presence everywhere. And when she left, it was almost like you could feel his real love went with her, as she rode out of the cemetery. It's was an amazing feeling. I'll never forget it. Well, you gotta have role models. He was an extraordinary guy.
    • Comedian and actor Bill Murray' full interview on his attending Elvis' funeral, published on August 9, 2004 at Permalink
  • Some people adore goats, some people believe the earth is flat, some even believe Elvis Presley is still alive. Simon Busuttil can believe whatever he wants but when the rest of the country hears these things, they laugh.
    • Joseph Muscat, Prime Minister of Malta, addressing a political gathering in Gozo, as reported by the Times of Malta on October 14, 2018.
  • Just above the lobby, the “Impact of the Bible” floor highlights how Scriptures have influenced cultures across the globe — from education and literature and art and architecture to a King James Bible owned by Elvis Presley which is just steps away from mannequins adorned with dresses by fashion designers such as Dolce and Gabbana, who have featured icons of the Virgin Mary in their brand.
    • Adelle M. Banks, reviewing the Museum of the Bible, which opened in Washington DC in late 2017, as published in the Deseret News on November 13, 2017
  • In 1959 (during his time in the Army), he came under the weather and military doctors diagnosed tonsillitis and suggested that the vocalist, then the biggest performer in the universe, have his tonsils removed. Presley, already more trustworthy than most modern performers in his pleasant acceptance of military duty, agreed. The problem was that no doctor nearby wanted to risk operating on the star, fearing that malpractice would leave him without his golden voice and either a lawsuit or an an angry fan could ruin any medical career and/or life. They gave him penicillin instead and fortunately everything worked out.
    • Published on the December 1, 2014 online edition of "Music Times", in an article aptly entitled "Tonsillitis and musicians, it aint no joke"
  • Love me tender. love me true....
    • Elon Musk, channelling Elvis with a ‘Love Me Tender’ tweet, baffling investors amid his Twitter row, in an article published by the South China Morning Post's April 19, 2022 edition.
  • Few people in my village have the slightest clue about life in America. To them we might as well be the center of the universe. I'm one of few lucky or unlucky ones (depending on how you look at it) who happened to, miraculously, have had the opportunity to live in both worlds. It goes without saying that I can also speak with confidence that my level of confusion is unparalleled. Once, I had confused Elvis Presley for Yuri Gagarin. In fact, there are people in Kokoland who still believe so. What difference will that make, anyway, when folks still believe that the Earth is flat?
    • Gony Mustafa, in his Book 20118 "iVillager", sharing his purposeful journey from a mythical Kokoland, actually a village in Western Sudan, to America and his discovery of enlightenment about the world

N[edit]

  • The Postal Service is being wasteful in spending nearly US$300,000 to promote its Elvis Presley stamp. To break even, they would have to sell more than one million stamps to collectors who do not then use them.
    • Ralph Nader, a few months before the USPS's announcement that it had netted US$36 million in profits, its highest ever, as a result of some 124 million stamps being purchased and kept by collectors, more than a third of those 500 million originally issued and sold.
  • The first time he was booked at the International, in July of 1969, some of us had our doubts. I mean, we opened July Fourth with Barbra Streisand, who'd just won an Oscar, had three pictures going. She was one of the hottest entertainment properties in the world. We knew we had something. Elvis [who was the second performer at the new hotel] was an unknown stage property who hadn't appeared live anywhere in eight years. We knew he'd be something of a draw, but my God! Elvis was a blockbuster, turning out to be an even bigger draw in subsequent runs at the International. I'm not sure how this figure was verified, but it has been reported the Maitre d' and head waiters split $10,000 in tips per night when he performed the following February.
    • Nick Naff, executive at the International Hotel in Las Vegas, for elvisdblñog.
  • When a polio vaccine became available in the United States in the 1950s, the March of Dimes, an organization that had been affiliated with President Franklin D. Roosevelt, made a major advertising push, with posters featuring young children who were most at risk of being infected. To boost public interest in the vaccine, Elvis Presley got vaccinated backstage at “The Ed Sullivan Show and it was seen as a patriotic thing,
  • My biggest musical influences are Elvis Presley and Led Zeppelin
    • Musician Anna Nalick, as published by SomethingElse, on 23 November, 2017.
  • Basically, I tried to mimic my big brothers in a sense. It was the days of peg pants, like today. Usually, when you inherit clothes from your bigger brother, the pants were longer anyway, so there was plenty of room to roll them up. So, yeah, I mimicked Elvis Presley, with his collar up and his slicked-back hair. He was cool, so we dressed as kids similar to what our big brothers did and the stars that we had seen. And I started (dressing) as Elvis (did) because, of course, he was special. My dad was with me one time in Vegas and we were allowed to go backstage where I introduced Elvis to my father. He took my dad and sat down on the couch and they sat there for about 30 minutes just talking and that. Boy, I tell you what, that was something. I'm standing there and Elvis is spending time with my dad. That day, I didn't tell him I dressed like him. He was wonderful. What a gentleman. He was close to the height of his career — one of the heights. I mean, he was always the smart one and the only person I was really thrilled by, and always appreciated his taking time out to talk to my dad, and I do to this day. .
    • Joe Namath, in an interview with ESPN in 2005 and in an article published by the Tuscaloosa News, on November 2, 2017.
  • I used to work in a record shop and one afternoon I heard them playing "Blue Moon" through the speakers. I'll always remember it coming through the fog. Later, I used to stand in the front room with a plywood guitar shaking my ass like Elvis. He was a genius.
    • Graham Nash, founder member of The Hollies and part of Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young, as interviewed by Caroline Rees for an article entitled, "My best six albums", wherein he included Elvis 30#1 hits and published in the Express, on Apr 22, 2016
  • There was something about Presley's voice. He had a wide vocal range: he could go up and down and stay in-between, with equal ease. There was also a powerful sensuality to his voice. You would know that if you had listened to ‘It’s Now Or Never.’ Besides he had great musicians backing him up.
    • Richard Nathan, lead singer for the Funkagenda, in an article published on 22 June, 2018 at The Hindu
  • I love Michael Jackson, Elvis Presley, even Marilyn Monroe.They had an iconic sense of style. I hope we don't lose that.
    • Shaleena Nathani, Indian film superstar Deepika Padukone's main dress designer, when asked to match one person, dead or alive, to style, and as pubkished in Filmfare.com's June 21, 2020 ediiton in an article entitled "!In conversation with the creative mind behind superstar wardrobes, Shaleena Nathani"
  • In the aftermath of Elvis Presley Estate litigation flurry, the Tennessee General Assembly enacted the Personal Rights Protection Act of 1984, providing clear statutory language ensuring personality rights are not extinguished at death and their descendibility to others. Additionally, the Tennessee Court of Appeals confirmed the descendibility of personality rights under common law in another case brought by the state against the “Elvis Presley International Memorial Foundation” for their unlicensed use of Elvis's name. The foundation argued there was “no descendible right of publicity in Tennessee and that Elvis Presley's name and image entered into the public domain when he died. The court made a clear distinction between the right to privacy and right to publicity, highlighting the economic value of a celebrity’s image, and in reviewing the Sixth Circuit's previous opinion on the matter, found their prior decision was made “without considering Tennessee law. Instead, the court recognized Tennessee has an “expansive view of property” and concluded a celebrity's right of publicity is a “species of intangible personal property” protected in Tennessee. Specifically, the court found descendability of personality rights promotes "an expectation that the investment in valuable capital assets will benefit one's heirs after death, the protection of contract rights, the discouragement of consumer deception, and the policy against unfair competition.Thus, the court held "Elvis Presley's right of publicity survived his death and remains enforceable by his estate and those holding licenses from the estate.
    • National Law Review, as published on October 10, 2016, in an article entitled 'Elvis and Prince: Personality Rights Guidance for Dead Celebrities and the Lawyers and Legislatures Who Protect Them by Peter Colin, Jr, the Review's 2016 Law Student Writing Competition Winner.
  • Elvis Presley once said that a man is one thing and an image is another. I didn't really know what Elvis meant by saying that until I was invited to visit the Joe DiMaggio Children's Hospital. As I approached it, I saw this statue of Joe DiMaggio in his Yankee uniform with his arm around a little boy. It was the most sensitive looking work of art that I have ever seen.
    • Children's books writer and author Ray Negron, in an article entitled Joe DiMaggio, Oh How I Wish I Knew You and as published by NY's Sports Day on March 14, 2017
  • Imagine Elvis Presley watching our show. He repeated episodes I'd even forgotten about, even remembering them word for word. And he gave me some great tips about things to do on my tour. You'll never know how much tonight has meant to me..I tpuched his Gold jacket...
    • Rick Nelson, as told to Photoplay editor Maria Borie the night he and Elvis met after Nelson attended Presley's second Pan Pacific Auditorium concert on October 28 1957.
  • In his heyday, when he was really hot, there was an explosion of energy between Elvis and his audience. I wasn't a wild fan of Elvis's, but put the man onstage doing his music, and you got something more powerful than the sum of its parts. You got magnetism in action. Maybe it was sexual, I don't know, but if ever a performer could get up onstage and turn a crowd into crashing waves of energy, it was Elvis. Yet Elvis couldn't really whip up a Las Vegas dinner-show crowd on a regular basis. I went to see Elvis one night on the Strip and I slipped in at the back of the room and listened a minute and thought: what is going on here? There was Elvis up there working his ass off, and the crowd was just kind of politely exhausted. They clapped and whistled, but you couldn't feel them giving anything back. I felt like jumping on top of a table and yelling, "Hey everybody, that's Elvis Presley up there! You should be jumping and screaming"
    • Willie Nelson (Nelson, Willie; Bud Shrake; Edwin Shrake (2000). Willie: An Autobiography. Cooper Square Press. p. 277. )
  • Around 3,000 years ago, David became King of Israel, and he named Jerusalem the capital. Now your father echoes his great deed by again recognizing that Jerusalem is our capital, for now and forever. Your father and I are so much alike, we both love Israel, have Jewish grandchildren and similar futures ahead of us. In fact, the great King of Rock ‘n’ Roll, Elvis Presley, could have been speaking about Donald and I when he sang ‘Let’s rock, everybody, let’s rock. Everybody in the whole cell block. We’ll be dancin’ to the Jailhouse Rock'.
    • Benjamin Netanyahu, Prime Minister of Israel, speaking at the opening of the United States Embassy in Jerusalem, on May 14, 2018, with the President's daughter, Ivanka Trump in the audience.
  • It was an ordeal of sorts for many of us —the compulsory monthly haircut at our boarding school in Tiruchy in the 1950s-. Few liked to have their painstakingly grown locks trimmed, let alone sheared off—and for a good reason. Elvis Presley was our much-loved idol then and most of us tried to emulate his puffed hairstyle— something the spoilsport warden frowned upon. He opined that a crew-cut suited us, and Tiruchy's sultry weather, better. So, fearing that we might be ‘scalped’, we drew upon all our reserves of charm to persuade Dasan, the surly school barber, to minimise his snipping and shearing so that we didn't look like skinheads! He grudgingly obliged us. We boys used to fervently hope that he wouldn't turn up to trim down our nicely burgeoning Elvis hairdos, but he always did, clad in a white shirt and dhoti carrying a rexine bag containing the tools of his trade...
    • George Netto, for the New Indian Express, in an article entitled "Rooting for Elvis Presley in school" and as published on 29th August 2018.
  • About 125 persons were lined up at the showroom reservation counter early Monday, normally a slow day. Last Saturday some 500 persons were there at 10 am in hopes of getting reservations during the busy weekend. Many were turned away. Officials at the International Hotel said weekends were sold out and that bookings during the week were "tight" for Presley's first appearance before a live audience in eight years. Some Presley fans came all the way from Europe to see the show. The hotel received a letter from a woman in France with a 100 franc note enclosed as a deposit for 10 shows. The woman wanted reservations for both the dinner and midnight shows for five straight days. So far we have yet to have an empty seat in the house. He is the hottest thing that has hit Las Vegas," said Bruce Banke, an executive of the hotel. It was his first stage appearance in eight years and his only return engagement to Las Vegas in 13 years. Presley in the flesh has lost nothing. It was still all there. Gyrating legs, wide stance, a bobbing head with tossed black hair, rotating guitar, knee bends and the pounding rhythm of such tunes as "Blue Suede Shoes", "Hound Dog", "Jailhouse Rock," "Heartbreak Hotel" and one of his newest recordings "In The Ghetto" He was contracted to appear here for sn undisclosed salary. Reportedly, Presley is being paid as much as Barbra Streisand who opened the resort in early July for a reported $1 million during a three-year period. Actor George Hamilton was among the first nighters along with businessmen of the Howard Hughes organization. A plane load of admirers flew in from Atlanta, and members of the news media converged here from the East Coast and Europe. Temperatures outside the International Hotel neared 110 degrees the night Presley opened inside the 2,200 seat showroom – after viewing an hour of Presley's gyrations – blood pressure were on the rise. Presley received a long standing ovation. It was one of the the rare occasions when a Las Vegas standing salute was sincere rather than rigged with a few cronies of an entertainer planted down front to stamp and scream approval.
    • Myram Borders for the Nevada State Journal in an article entitled Presley Breaks Attendance Records in Vegas as published on their August 8, 1969 edition.
  • At first I would see a kid who used to come over to the Plantation Inn Club when we were over there. That kid was Elvis Presley. He would show up every Wednesday and Friday night to see me do Calvin's Boogie and Junior's Jive. I feel that Elvis' later success actually broke the ice for civil rights, because that was the issue during that time, the fact he sent the black idiom all over the world in his music.
    • Calvin Newborn African American Jazz guitarrist, whose gigs at the Plantation Inn Club, as well as his home, Elvis frequented, in an interview for the documentary "Why Elvis"
  • i) I played a rock and roll star in the fifties... Who was that big guy then, Elvis, yeah, Elvis, well we did a movie in England at that same time ii) I knew I could never sing like him, but just did my best.
    • Anthony Newley, i) telling Joan Rivers in a 1985 interview, about his playing a character in the English film Idle on Parade, based on the 1958 novel by William Camp which in turn was inspired by Elvis Presley's conscription into the US Army and ii) in a 1959 interview with the Guardian.
  • The recent news about robocalls takes me back to last November. I was coming in the back door loaded down with stuff for Thanksgiving. The phone was ringing, but I told myself, “Let it ring, don’t answer it. Don’t do it — you are going to drop something, you know it." “Ignore the phone call,” I said aloud to no one, yet I knew I wouldn't ignore the call. So I put down the bags — really dropped the bags — and rushed to the phone. As I put away bags of squashed lettuce and more — thank goodness, no eggs that day. “Return to Sender.” an old Elvis Presley song came to my head. In my mind's eye I saw a tall, handsome man standing in front of me singing that song. I picked up the phone to look at it — and like a light bulb, an idea came to me. A button. That's what we need: a button, I said in my head. When the calls come in and you know it's not for you — it's not for anyone human — you could press the "star" button twice, maybe, and the call goes back. Every single time. So here's my question for the technicians and scientists out there: Why can't we return robocalls to the people who send them? We should be able to. In fact, we would all be so thankful to the technicians and scientists of the world for developing such a technology. And they don't even need a new name for it. “Return to Sender” would do. I'm sure Elvis wouldn't mind.
    • Newsday's Regina Phelps, in an article entitled "My Turn: Elvis has the answer to the modern dilemma of robocalls̊" as published on their 21 March, 2019 edition.
  • Dressed in a chic black tunic and bell bottoms, Elvis Presley stepped onstage last week at the International Hotel in Las Vegas and launched into the driving beat of "Blue Suede Shoes." The audience of 2,200, most of them over 30, roared and squealed in nostalgic appreciation. In spite of his updated look, Elvis hadn't changed at all in the nearly nine years since his last personal appearance. Oozing the sullen sexuality that threw the America into a state of shock in the 50's, he groaned and swiveled through a medley of "Jailhouse Rock," "Don't Be Cruel," "Heartbreak Hotel," "All Shook Up" and "Hound Dog". It was hard to believe he was 34 and no longer 19 years old. In fact, there are several unbelievable things about Elvis, but the most incredible is his staying power in a world where meteoric careers fade like shooting stars, Presley shot to the top in 1956 with "Heartbreak Hotel" and has stayed in the uppermost tax bracket ever since. When, during a news conference after the opening, a British entrepreneur offered Elvis a million pounds sterling for one appearance in London, it was Parker who answered: "Bring me a deposit tomorrow. Elvis arrived in Las Vegas a week before the show and immediately began rehearsing five hours a day-losing 10 pounds in the process. Only celebrities and big spenders were there opening night to hear Presley sing a lot of oldies and one new song, with a new message aimed at the black rock market. "In The Ghetto" chronicles the evils of poverty in a Chicago slum and could signal the birth of a social conscience for Presley. Another recent record release, "If I Can Dream," proclaims brotherhood according to the gospel of Martin Luther King, but did not appear on the Vegas program. When asked if these songs marked a new direction he might take, Elvis answered, "I go by the material. When I got 'In The Ghetto,' I couldn't turn it down.
    • Portions of Newsweek magazine̪'s review of his July 31, 1969, opening show at the International Hotel, in Las Vegas, published in their August 11, 1969, edition
  • I have seen spectacular performers, Buffalo Bill, Enrico Caruso, John Philip Souza, Billy Sunday, Al Jolson, the Marx Brothers, Frank Sinatra, Lena Horne and Liberace but I have never witnessed a storm of excitement like the one generated by Elvis Presley.
    • Dwight Newton's laud of Elvis, after reviewing his October 26,1957 concert at the Oakland Civic Centre for the San Francisco Examiner. Newton, who started his journalistic career in 1927, passed away in 2000, at age 98.
  • It was huge. I was terrified, I remember that I had my little white lace dress. It was very scary, invited as I was to see Elvis's show and to meet him afterwards and even more intimidating, if incredibly flattering, as he was covering one of my early country hits – If You Love Me, Let Me Know. I went with Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber backstage and Elvis was supposed to come and meet us. But something happened, he had an emergency and he had to leave. It was one of those 'Almost!' moments...
    • Olivia Newton-John in an interview with the Brisbane Times, published on October 22, 2016.
  • From the first quavering notes of the song, it was obvious that there was something different about him -- you could detect his influences, but he didn't sound like anyone else. There is a quality of unutterable plaintiveness as Elvis, in 1953, sings "My Happiness", a pop hit,in 1948, for Jon and Sandra Steele, and a sentimental ballad that couldn't have been further from anyone's imaginings of rock-and-roll. It is just a pure, yearning, almost desperately pleading solo voice reaching for effect. The guitar, Elvis said, "sounded like somebody beating on a bucket lid," with an added factor of nervousness that Elvis must surely have felt. But even that is not particularly detectable -- there is a strange sense of calm, an almost unsettling stillness in the midst of great drama. When he finished, the boy looked up expectantly at the man in the control booth. Mr. Phillips nodded and said politely that he was an "interesting" singer. "We might give you a call sometime."
    • Description of the-then 18-year-old Elvis paying $4 to make a personal record at Sam Phillips's Memphis Recording Service in 1953, as published by the New York Times on October 9, 1994, in an article entitled "The stirrings of a King"
  • Recently, someone asked the question of who had been the one individual who'd helped save the most money in the US healthcare industry in the last century. The answer – surprisingly – is Elvis Presley. On October 28, 1956, Elvis got a polio vaccination before his appearance on national TV. That event was responsible for raising immunization levels in the US from 0.6% to over 80% in just 6 months. No other single individual has had that kind of impact on healthcare in the US.
    • NEXUS, a former Dimension Data now Nippon Telegraph and Telephone owned company's laud of Elvis' influence on the eradication of polio, as published in their online page in an article entitled "U.S. Healthcare Needs Another Elvis" on February 6, 2015.
  • These last three years he's been so used to people tearing at him wherever he goes that he's drawn-into as hell. He's so used to being alone with a few close friends and going for drives and playing records that you can't get him out
    • Anne Neyland, who dated Elvis during the shoot of jailhouse Rocvk, as told to Photoplay in 1960.
  • A toss-up between seeing Elvis live in Las Vegas in the 1970s and taking a dip in the thermal waters of Iceland’s Blue Lagoon ...
    • Paul Nicholas's most memorable travel experience, as published in the Daily Mail's January 8, 2022 edtion.
  • While vastly different individuals, Abraham Lincoln, Elvis Presley and Martin Luther King Jr. were all brave Americans who firmly stood for what they believed.
    • Kevin Nicholson, former President of the College Democrats and a speaker at the 2000 Democratic National Convention, during a dinner for Lincoln Day at the Kosh­konong Mounds Country Club at Jefferson County, Wisconsin, as published in the daily Journal's edition of 13 February, 2017.
  • We were first called the Grim Reapers and we recorded at this place in Janesville (Wisconsin). It was in a barn and this guy [had] a four-track machine. We recorded a song called ‘Cruisin’ for Burgers' and we did Elvis' ‘Hound Dog, When the people at Epic Records heard it, and they decided they liked us well enough where they gave us a record deal, they asked us to change our name to Fuse which eventually became Cheap Trick in 1973. Ad then we lived through a series of highs and lows before encountering a particularly difficult era in the mid-‘80s. That changed with the release of our 1988 comeback album Lap of Luxury, which contained another Elvis track, in fact it was the only version of an Elvis song that went to the Top 5 – ‘Don’t Be Cruel. So there’s two references to Elvis Presley in our career.”
    • Rick Nielsen, lead guitarist for Cheap Trick, in an interview for Ultimate Classic Rock and focusing on how Elvis impacted twice in their career, as published on their December 9, 2018 edition
  • A group of teenage girls stood at the driveway eager to see a glimpse of him. Then, as someone inside ruffled a curtain, the girls all screamed, totally convinced that they had seen Elvis. Was that Elvis at the window? we would all scream. And, of course, it never was but just another exciting Saturday night at Audubon Drive...
    • Elizabeth Nielson, recalling for the Tennessean her time in 1956, when she was 15 and a resident at the Williamson neighborhood where Elvis first Memphis home at Audobun Drive was located. Such was the excitement outside the home, and the neighbors' complaints, that the Presleys had to move, after a year, to Graceland.
  • I wasn't even born when Elvis passed away, but I am hugely grateful for the musical doors knocked down by him. It was good to have people like that who weren't scared to take chances back then. You don't take chances to do it in vain; you take chances musically because you care, or you want to be different, or you want to see what would happen if you mix this with that. It takes an open mind, but Elvis was one of those people that whatever he did, it was right. I love the fact that Elvis was a country boy.
    • Jerrod Niemann's laud of Elvis on the 35th Anniversary of His Death, as published by The Boot's August 16, 2012 edition.
  • I knew little of him before we met at the White House. But, as I talked to him, I felt he was basically a very shy man. People say that because he had trouble at the end of his life, that he could not have been a good example, but they overlooked the fact he always used medication prescribed by his physician, so I think that he was always a very sincere and decent man.
    • Former US President Richard Nixon, as detailed in the PBS program "We were there when Elvis and Nixon met".
  • Elvis Presley is my spiritual father and, as you may know, Maria Callas is my spiritual mother.
    • Klaus Nomi, German countertenor noted for his wide vocal range and an unusual, otherworldly stage persona, as noted in azquotes.
  • Eminem is a King in his own right, a genius. He's our Elvis and I think we should claim that."
    • N.O.R.E, American hip hop and reggaeton recording artist, of Puerto Rican extraction, in an interview with vladrv
  • Like myself, Elvis was introduced to the world of self defense while in the military. He would study many styles under many different ethnic instructors throughout his life. In 1959 he started as a student under German Jürgen Seydel, (a Shokotan sensei), then was mentored under Japanese Teugio Murakami (a Shokotan master), Korean Kang Rhee (Sa-Ryu TaeKwon Do Grandmaster), Americans Hank Slemansky (a Chito Ryu stylist) and Ed Parker (the founder of American Kenpo – who would remain his lifelong teacher), and Filipino Dan Inosanto (later Bruce Lee’s student). Elvis’ love for martial arts permeated his career in music and movies, where he'd often demonstrate his self-defense moves. I'll never forget seeing him perform, sitting in the front booth with Bob Wall as the special guests of his wife Priscilla at a dinner show at the Las Vegas Hilton and being captivated by his charisma and showmanship. That was the day Bob and I first met him, when, after the show Elvis invited all of us up to his suite, where we talked until 4:00 in the morning. At first I thought, “What are we going to talk about?” I knew nothing about music, but I knew I could talk about martial arts all night long! And we did! I was impressed with his self defense insight and devotion. Even after two shows earlier that evening, Elvis stayed to the early morning hours shooting the breeze with us. That was a special night for all of us, which I'll never forget. Elvis was a real nice, down-to-earth guy, who made you feel in a few hours like you had known him forever. I still enjoy his music and films.
    • Chuck Norris, in an article published on WND's August 13, 2007 edition.
  • Before any of my debates, I listen to Elvis Presley's version of “My Way.”, just to get myself psyched up...
    • Physician Ralph Northam, 40th Lieutenant Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia and the 2017 Democratic candidate for Governor, as reported by the Washington Post, on October 24, 2017.
  • He is arguably one of the most iconic figures in American culture, the boy from East Tupelo who wanted a gun for his 11th birthday, got a guitar instead and went on to change the world introducing a unique musical style that combined pop, country, gospel and rhythm and blues. Although he moved to Memphis at a young age, Presley's home was, and will always be Tupelo...
    • The Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal's editorial laud of Elvis Presley after his having been inducted, in 2016, to the Mississippi Hall of Fame in an article entitled "Exceptional Mississippians deserve great recognition" and published on December 14, 2016.
  • The entourage was assembled, and the caravan headed out so Puffy, Biggie and I got into my Ford Explorer. I had a six-disc player, and it automatically went to Elvis 'Suspicious Minds' and Puffy was like, ‘What’s wrong with you? Biggie was in the back and he said, ‘Hey, man, chill out. Elvis was cool,’ I thought it was so awesome that Biggie was sticking up for me for listening to Elvis.” ~
    • About the Notorious B.I.G.'s reaction to his friend Michael Levine's listening to Elvis in his car, as told by Levine in 1997 and as published by The Guardian and The Undefeated.
  • Nowadays, with the cult of celebrity so firmly ingrained in western society, it seems obvious that having a leading star flash their wrist at a large audience would see a brand's sales go through the roof. But when Elvis Presley wore the Hamilton Ventura in the 1961 film Blue Hawaii, the then American brand couldn't have imagined the enduring effect of Presley's contribution.
    • Rob Nudds's laud of Presley's selling power, even in 1961, when using the first electric watch to have ever been made, a truly unique piece then owned by Paramount and which sold, years later, to the Swiss watchmaker Swatch, for US $1million
  • That was the one thing that they knew that could conquer the world. They had the greatest dancers. They had the greatest choreographers and teachers in the world. And so at the time of Nureyev's defection, they were going to the West, and it was just two months after Yuri Gagarin went into space, and it was an enormous embarrassment to them, as he was also one of those enormous stars that you probably won't get again. He and people like him, like Elvis, they were sort of larger than life, and they stood out more. ...
    • About Rudolph Nureyev's extraterrestrial, larger-than-life aspect to him as noted by film Director Robert Morris to Robin Young of "Here & Now's", and as reported on WUR.org's April 25, 2019

O[edit]

  • So go ahead Bruce, and give me the Elvis take on cultural appropriation right now. I don’t want to get waylaid I should say, but I am a big Elvis fan. And I’m not a believer of narrowingly defining who gets to do what. I think we steal from everybody, from everywhere and that’s the nature of humanity, of culture, that is how ideas migrate. That’s how music gets created. That is how food gets created. I don’t want us to be thinking that there’s this way for that person and that way for the other person. I think what’s always been relevant about cultural appropriation is if the black person who writes the song and who performs it better can’t also perform it and can’t get the record deal. I’ve got no problem with white artists doing black music cause I don’t think there’s such a thing as simply, exclusively black music or white music, or hispanic music. It’s the economics and the power dynamics underneath it which Elvis obviously was part of, but he didn’t create it.
    • US President Barack Obama, transcripted verbatim from the eight and last episode of a podcast ("Renegades: Born in the USA") entitled "Looking towards American Renewal" made in conjunction with Bruce Springsteen, and as published on Newsroom/Spotify's March 21, 2021 edition.
  • In Michelle Obama's Netflix documentary "Becoming" her stylist, Meredith Koop, fingers a suit that awaits the first lady turned bestselling author backstage on her book tour. It's pale pink and pimped with diamanté. “She is not a minimalist,” Koop deadpans. “When I look at this suit I do see Elvis and I don’t have a problem with that.” That's nothing. It's followed up in short order in the TV show by Obama's now-infamous turn in gold-sequinned Balenciaga thigh boots, and a dress slashed so high that you are left in no doubt that thigh boots are precisely what they are. This isn't mere Elvis style. This is Lady Gaga too.
    • About Michelle Obama, as noted by Anna Murphy, Fashion Director for the Times of London in an article entitled "Me and Michelle Obama? We take style tips from Elvis" as published in the paper's June 20th edition.
  • "One good turn deserves another/Be my love, I'll be your lover/It's all part of nature's laws/If you'll scratch my back, then I'll scratch yours" That's not a poem; it's actually the first stanza of an Elvis Presley song, titled ‘Scratch my back". The phrase, ‘scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours’ was not coined by the writers of Presley's song, having been in existence way before Presley was even born but what it basically means is that a favour done will be returned, and that nothing goes for nothing.
    • Buchi Obichie, writing on Legit about Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari's 2019 re-election bid, and the price he may have to pay to garner the support he needs, as published on November 2, 2018.
  • When I was at Harvard, and it's the 80s, and I had sort-of come of age with 60s and 70s music, so Elvis wasn't a big interest of mine. And, then in 1983, I listened for the first time to The Sun Sessions, Elvis' earliest work that he did with Sam Phillips. It blew my mind. It was like a drug. I couldn't get enough. It made me go out and buy a guitar. It made me try and play that music. And, in a sense, I've never gotten past that music. I can't get past early Elvis. I appreciate other music, but I'm always drawn back. It's just this energy. What I've always noticed about Elvis is there's nobody more talented, or better looking. He's a rare example of the complete package and he is at the right time. He's got it all. I listen to Elvis nearly every night on Sirius. I love it. Yet, there's always part of me that's very sad that Elvis couldn't have lived to see how great his work was. He was someone who was revered. To see that whole generation come out and play with him and support. And let him know that his work meant something in the American tapestry, but he never got that chance.
    • Conan O'Brien, television host, comedian and producer, speaking with Elvis' foremost biographer, Peter Guralnick, as published on Elvisblog on May 31, 2013.
  • As you know, I died in Chicago. I lost my life and I went to heaven because I was very good and sang very lyrical songs. And I got to talk to God and he said, 'Well, what do you want to do? You can go back and be anyone you want.' So I thought who do I want to be? And I thought, I wanted to be the guy who was the King of Pop, the king of show business, Elvis Presley If there's any hope for America, it lies in a revolution. If there's any hope for a revolution in America, it lies in getting Elvis Presley into becoming Che Guevera. If you don't do that, you're just beating your head against the wall, or the cop down the street will beat your head against the wall. We have to discover where he is, he's the ultimate American artist."
    • Phil Ochs, addressing the audience, from his album "In Gunfight at Carnegie Hall", a concert recorded at Carnegie Hall in New York on March 27, 1970. He wa making a reference to his being in Chicago, during the Convention demonstrations, in 1968.
  • She has a taste in music that almost perfectly reflects her style, having been in politics for longer than a large portion of the electorate has been alive, and her musical tastes appear to be just mainstream, contemporary Top 40 radio music. Another large portion of her playlist features Jennifer Lopez, Marc Antony and Juanes. But like her opponent, Clinton also professes a love for the music of her youth, including her being a fan of Elvis Presley,
    • Waylon O'Day, in an article entitled Music and the 2016 Election: Trump and Clinton, published on November 3, 2016
  • (In fact), Elvis Presley was a fan. I was thrilled by that; I really was. We never know how we affect the people we come in contact with. We cannot decide how it is we affect anybody. It makes me feel wonderful when I feel that it is something I have done that makes them go on.
    • Odetta, African American singer, actress, guitarist, songwriter, and civil and human rights activist, speaking at the First Amendment Center on Presley's recording of Bob Dylan's Tomorrow is a long time", where she expressed pleasure in finding out Elvis was a fan of hers, as told on March 25th 1999.
  • There is just too much difficulty for getting radio airplay for my new music. Most every song today is the same chords for maybe 300 bars. But I imagine they said the same thing about us when we were jumping around on Elvis Presley and Little Richard and Fats Domino and Sam Cooke and Otis Redding and James Brown. I guess it's all in what you call evolution...
    • The O'Jays's Eddie Levert, on his return to entertainment at age 75, as published in the Detroit News, on December 28, 2016.
  • O'Keefe was deeply depressed by Elvis Presley's death. He was his idol and O'Keefe would keep telling friends that he would be next. Six days after appearing on the Seven Network Show Sounds (which was a little over a year after Presley's death), O'Keefe passed away from a heart attack.
    • About Johnny O’Keefe's lasting impact on Australian music, as noted in Stars at 60, on December 3, 2016.
  • I think the best analogy for where we are right now is that America is Elvis Presley... the most beautiful, talented, rebellious nation in the history of Earth. And now, America is wheezing its way through ‘Love Me Tender". But America's still the King.”
    • British comedian John Oliver, as published on the CheatSheet's March 31, 2019 edition.
  • I don’t like to seem like I’m bragging, but I’m going to ask you a question. Who owns Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley, Forever 21? and JCPenney? Me!!! My real business is I own 50 brands, So, when I was retiring, I’m looking around, I’m like ‘How does Michael Jackson and all these guys live forever?’ So, one of the chapters in the book, joint venture-ship. So, I called the three companies, seemingly Authentic Brand Group, Simon Property Group, and Brookfield Property Partners and they bought my brand for a lot of money. So, I took half that money, put it back in the company, now I’m the number two guy in the company. I put money back in the company, and now I own all those other brands, so if I ever go away, we still got Elvis.
    • Shaquille O’Neal from an article entitled "Mic Drop: Shaquille O’Neal Shuts Down the Internet with His Financial Portfolio, Owns Forever 21, Elvis Presley, and Much More", as published in the Atlanta'a Black Star's July 9, 2021 edition.
  • Of course, it was hard to get to Elvis because you had to go through Parker. But when I found myself in Las Vegas, in August of 1969 I had a way in and that was through my friend Tom Jones. Tom was friendly with Elvis so he fixed it with Parker that Tom and I could sit close enough to take some photos of him performing on stage. Afterwards I went backstage and met Elvis and he just struck as the best looking man I’d ever seen, even better than the pictures...
    • Terry O'Neill, UK celebrity photographer, in an interview for IconicImages as published on their 30th March 2017 edition.
  • The first thing he did when he came out in 1955 in Texas, it seemed like he was spitting on the stage. It all affected me like the first time I saw that David Lynch film. There was just no reference point in the culture to compare it too. In fact, he was the firstest with the mostest.
  • As Elvis noted, 'A little less conversation, a little more action, please.'
    • Hugh O'Reilly, President and CEO of Canada's OPTrust, telling attendees at a climate-change seminar that this is the moment for institutional investors to become the force behind incorporating climate risk into investing, as published in Pensions & Investments on 25 September, 2018.
  • It's hard to pick one, because I love Celia Cruz’s depth, Elvis Presley’s vibrato, Ray Charles’ texture, and Amy Winehouse’ melancholy flow;
    • R&B singer Natalie Orfilia, citing her favourite singers, in an article published at Rollingout's October 25, 2018 edition.
  • Pat, then 13 as I was, got the tickets through her mom’s boyfriend who was a captain or something with the St. Louis Police Department. After the show, he asked us if we wanted to go backstage and meet Elvis, Once there, I noticed everyone was trying to get his attention, wanting him to sign things and take his picture, and he would say ‘yes, ma’am’ and ‘yes, sir’ to everyone. No matter how crazy it got, he was unfailingly polite. I like that he didn't at all act like a big shot. The photo with us, once it hit the papers, obviously, was a big hit at my school. People would bring it up to me all the time. When the picture was taken, I happened to have my eyes closed, so all my friends would tease me. They'd say, "You’re in love with Elvis, your eyes are closed" LOL. After graduating from Roosevelt High in 1960, I got a bachelor's degree from Mizzou in 1964, the same year I competed in the Miss Missouri pageant. Though neither of us, Pat and I, were able to follow his entire career, it was all really sad what happened to him. But I just remember how nice he was to us.
    • Kathy Orio, reminiscing about the night she and her friend Patricia (Pat) Vardell, met Elvis after his Kiel Auditorium concert on March 29, 1957 in an article published in the St Louis Dispatch's March 29, 2014 edition and entitled " 57 years later, former St. Louis resident recalls 'polite' Elvis
  • I got a letter from Elvis in 1961, I was 16, and the letter said, “I just want you to know I put "Halfway to Paradise" in my jukebox.” When I finally met him in the ‘70s, I was headlining the Hilton in Las Vegas and was actually following him a week later. I sat with him in his dressing room and then I said, “Let me ask you a question. Do you remember writing a letter to me, saying that you liked "Halfway to Paradise?” And he calls Priscilla into the room, and he said, “Tell Tony what my favourite song is.” And sure enough, it was "Halfway to Paradise",
    • Tony Orlando,in an interview with Shawn Conner with the Vancouver Sun, published on April 6, 2016-
  • In late 1956, at a Buenos Aires railway station where I ended up sleeping my first night after arriving from the provinces, that is when I heard his voice, which caused me shock, fear, but it also generated an artistic purpose on me. It changed my life. ii) Years later, I noticed Peter Rock was the best Latin American Elvis, until I saw Sandro
    • Palito Ortega, Elvis greatest fan amongst all Latin American singers, as stated in an interview in la Tercera's December 26, 2017 edition IIU) ii) CNN interview Aug 23, 2018
  • I remember watching this guy walk through the door as a regular human being, and the night before he was a master of the stage. That magic that aura, that whatever, he left it on the stage, because when he was with you he was a someone you could talk to, in other words, a very, very nice person.
  • Me, as a fan of music, I wasn't real sure at first — I wanted to see how it is — but this is something groundbreaking. For me, I would love to see a David Bowie [hologram performance], or I would love to see... maybe not a whole night, but AC/DC with... four songs with Bon Scott. Especially, people I've never seen — Elvis, I'd love to see an Elvis one
    • Tim "Ripper" Owens, heavy metal singer, on the subject of the holograms he would like to see, as published in Blabbermouth on December 17, 2017.
  • People talk of his range and power, his ability and ease in hitting the high notes. But the real difference between Elvis and other singers was that he could sing majestically in any style, be it rock, country, or R&B – because he had soul. He sang from the heart. And that is what made him the greatest singer in the history of popular music.
    • John Owen Williams, English A&R executive, record producer, photographer, manager, recording artist, and songwriter, speaking about the soul in Elvis'voice.

P[edit]

  • It was in Vegas in '73 and it was really something to see. They really didn't know what to do with each other. Obviously Elvis was enthralled to be in Ali's presence, but so was Ali, he loved Elvis. Elvis came in to Ali's hotel room with the robe, 'The People's Champ' written on the back in jewels. Ali sees Elvis coming in and says, 'Hey, that's Elvis, man. He looks pretty good!' And both of them looked at each other like good-looking women would look at each other to appraise how they look. At that time, Ali was at the height of his good looks, so this was probably the best-looking black guy and the best-looking white guy on the planet in that room, and they were looking at each other like roosters. 'You look good, Ali.' 'Yeah, you're looking good, Elvis'. So here they are and they really wanted to be friends with, and respected each other and the love was there, but they couldn't quite get as close as they would have liked. But the robe Elvis presented to Ali that night was the only one he ever kept..
    • Ferdie Pacheco, Muhammed Ali's personal physician and cornerman, on the day Ali and Elvis met, as published in the Sabotage Times, 8 January 2016 edition.
  • i) I am doing probably what they were doing up there, which is try to emulate the music I heard coming from America in some shape or form. It's defining coming from America, rock 'n' roll, rockabilly if you like, like in the modes of what (Elvis) Presley was doing and inspiring so many people like Buddy Holly, Gene Vincent, all of them. And then accessing the blues and wanting as much to be sort of B.B. King, do you know what I mean? It was this sort of growth, really, of this voracious appetite I had for all things six strings, really. I can see how it manifests across the board. ii) We got to meet Elvis on May 11, 1974. He'd been the one who'd done so much for so many, setting everyone alight and flighting right under the radar with all of this black music, doing numbers by country blues artists like Arthur Crudup and Sleepy John Estes. It was unbelievable. He was one of us. And think about it! He started in 1954 – that was more than ten years before we arrived. It's miraculous that he made it through! He had the hand of God over him, he really did. He was the one that brought it all together. He brought blues and race music to the white culture. Rewinding to 1974, we were invited to see him play and then invited back to a party afterward. We went up to his suite. There was just a few other people. I can tell you we were really nervous when he came in the door. He really moved as naturally cool in real life as he did on film. That wasn't an act, that's just how he really was! It was real cool to us. It was a little awkward at first because his music meant so much to us but then somebody said 'You know that hot rod you drove in the movie 'Loving You'? And that was that everybody just drove into the conversation relaxed and had fun. He was wonderful a fantastic man!!! On this day in 1998, I played at Tupelo, where Elvis was born and raised, when there were no local attractions apart from the cotton fields or getting to Memphis. When Elvis grew up it must have been pretty bleak but the white and black picked the cotton side by side and the local indigenous music provided the soundtrack to this tough environment and it took the visionary genius of Elvis to blend those musical sources and change the world.
    • Jimmy Page, lead guitarist for Led Zeppelin, telling reporter i) Gary Graff of 105.7 WROR, on 31 March 2017 about his US influences and ii)David Frickle on how it felt for a child a of post-war Britain, to meet Presley as published in RollingStone magazine's October 28, 2014 edition, as well as from the book "Light and Shade" published in 2012.
  • It was during filming that I remember a particularly special day. Elvis and the assistant directors gathered the whole cast & crew together on set for an important announcement. Elvis was beaming. I remember the anticipation of what he would say, and he stood up on a couple of apple boxes and shared with us all the news that his wife Priscilla was expecting. His famous smile and the glint in his eyes expressed such happiness! Everyone applauded and yelped ‘congratulations!’ Then, Elvis looked over at me among the crowd, pointed, and said, “And I want a little girl just like you!” It was an unbelievably happy moment – I ran over and hugged him...
    • Victoria Paige Meyerink, child actress and future motion picture director, recalling the time when, as a 7 year old, she co-starred with Elvis in "Speedway".
  • Back in the early days of Storage Wars, Dave Hester happily filled the role of resident baddie, driving folks crazy with his belligerent swagger, always looking to pick a fight or drive up the price of a unit that someone else wanted, even if his only objective was to stick in their craw and get them to lose their cool. But in spite of the rascally overtones, Hester was still a savvy player who did well during his time on the program. The best example of his success came all the way back in the first season, when Hester bought a storage unit that was loaded with newspapers. At first it seemed that all Hester had done was purchase a load of outdated periodicals. But then he discovered that the stash was all from the same day: August 17, 1977. Sound familiar? That's the day after Elvis Presley died. The unit ended up being a gold mine, with the plethora of papers all sporting the King of Rock and Roll's face adding up to a staggering $90,000.
    • Jaron Pak, recalling for Looper, an extraordinary Elvis related find by Dave Hester, a participant during the first season of US TV reality show "Storage Wars", in an article published in their December 29, 2018 edition. its narrative dovetailing nicely with the notion that August 17, 1977 was the day when more newspapers were printed, and sold in America since November 23, 1963, the day after JFK's assassination
  • It doesn't get any bigger than Elvis
    • Annastacia Palaszczuk, Queensland's Premier, welcoming the fact Baz Luhrmann's "Elvis" was filmed entirely in Queensland, creating about 900 local jobs, as noted in the Dinglketon Argus' June 4, 2022 edition
  • I didn't think much of him when I first met him in Las Vegas in April of 1956 before he was a movie star. After working with him in Jailhouse Rock, I saw a complete different side to his character and then I enjoyed working with him.
    • Gloria Pall, as noted in her book entitled "I Danced Before the King (Elvis)", a reference to the known fact she played the showgirl whose legs are briefly seen in "Jailhouse Rock"
  • But the last side, recorded during rehearsals for his 1968 television special, is another treat, as fine and tough and overflowing with heart and soul as any of his 50's recordings. Playing an electric guitar, rather than his customary acoustic model, he traded fluid rhythm and lead parts with Scotty Moore, their interplay almost telepathic. And with his original drummer, D. J. Fontana, stoking the fires, this music moved, from the ferocious version of Rufus Thomas's Sun Records label blues "Tiger Man" to Jimmy Reed blues shuffles, to smoldering New Orleans triplet-style blues-ballads like "Lawdy Miss Clawdy" and "One Night". This is rock and roll as good as it gets.
    • Robert Palmer, reviewing Elvis' boxed set, ¨A Golden Celebration¨ , for the New York Times on Nov. 18, 1984.
  • I remember that all my music listening had to be from the single family wireless receiver, which was built like a piece of furniture and took up an entire corner of the front room. It was from this Ekco set that I first heard Elvis Presley's "Heartbreak Hotel". It was a musical epiphany for me. His moody syncopated delivery was astonishing, daring, disrespectful. My father came in while I was listening and he asked, "Something wrong with the set?". He was going to check the valves at the back but I told him that it was Elvis Presley and that he was meant to sound like that.
    • UK Comedian and actor Michael Palin, of Monty Python fame, describing his early affinity with the arts, entertainment and music in an interview publshed by Australia's Sidney Morning Herald, on November 13, 2014
  • Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Elvis Presley has received more than 49 million page views. His biography is available in 167 different languages resulting in his becoming the most read of any singer since 3,500 BC, as well as the subject of its 19th most analyzed biography amongst those people, of all professions, known have been born on US soil since 1776
    • Pantheon 's laud of Elvis, as noted in their 2022 edited, 2.0 online program which maps the historical cultural production, or celebrity, of every person born after 3,500 BC
  • When he turned it on, Elvis sang with the spiritual fervour of one who spoke in tongues, not so much communicating with the listener, as communing. Our continuing fascination with Elvis is a testament to both his charisma and his voice. The details are secondary. To paraphrase the literary critic and poet Al Alvarez, all that matters is that you hear the voice. When this happens, Elvis Presley doesn't just hold a mirror up to nature, he creates an eternal moment, leaving the sound of his voice on the airwaves as distinctly as Leonardo Da Vinci forever fixed the Mona Lisa smile in time.
    • Richard J Parfitt, Senior Lecturer in Music and the Performing Arts at Bath Spa University, as abridged from an article entitled "The Quasi religious significance of Elvis", published in the online edition of The Comversation, on December 11, 2014.
  • I've had the luckiest and greatest life you can imagine, like when Elvis Presley turned to me and introduced me to Johnny Cash. Before I knew it, I was standing in between the two legends.
    • Arnold Parker, country musician, recalling for the Victoria Advocate the days when he toured with Elvis and Johnny Cash, in 1955, as members of the Louisiana Hayride
  • Donald Trump and Bill Clinton were born two months apart in 1946 into a revolutionary culture that soon would embrace a hip-swiveling crooner named Elvis Presley and Hugh Hefner's Playboy magazine. Basically, everything you need to know about them can be found in these two mid-century icons. A fellow Southerner, Clinton saw himself as Elvis. Even now, his face sometimes betrays Elvis's smoldering glance with the slightly curled lip. Trump, a New York City boy, was Hefner. He collected all the toys of the Playboy lifestyle — boats, planes, cars — the best of everything a guilt-mongering rich boy would seek to glam up his sex appeal. Mar-a-Lago was his Playboy Mansion. All three of his wives have been bunny quality, and Trump Tower isn't just a tall building.
    • Kathleen Parker, Pulitzer Prize winner for Commentary in 2010, in an article for the Washington Post entitled Who is worse, Trump or Clinton, published on October 12, 2016
  • Come to think of it, Elvis, having black females as background singers might be bad going into southern regional areas, such as Texas..
    • Colonel Tom Parker, advising his Elvis not to take the Sweet Inspirations to his six back to back shows which, as it turned out, drew 200,000 fans at the Houston Astrodome in late February and early March of 1970. Elvis response "Fine, then we won't do any more gigs in Texas or any other such places that don't accept them. In fact, if they don't accept them, they don't accept me" , with the latter quote coming from Cissy Houston, lead singer of the Sweet Inspirations and the mother of Whitney Houston, in an interview for YouTube.
  • The news I could bring is that I met up with The King
    • Gram Parsons on meeting Elvis backstage after a concert in his hometown of Waycross, GA, on February 22, 1956 following which he decided to become a musician. He was 9 years old.
  • I don't know of anybody that doesn't like Elvis or heard anybody say, ‘Oh, I don’t like his singing.’ Everybody loved Elvis, and I just think that's incredible. He was so different in every way — his voice, his style, the way he moved, the way he looked. He just had this charm and charisma and a lot of sex appeal.
    • Dolly Parton who, along with a few others, voted Elvis as the top entertainer in CMT Top 40 artist countdown, as published in CMT's online edition of November 21, 2014.
  • He was remembered as an ambassador who had a hand in the Redbirds moving from Louisville to Memphis, the building of AutoZone Park, and by extension, the Grizzlies' move from Vancouver to Memphis. He made Memphis sports what it is. He's the guy. What Elvis Presley did, that's what he did.
    • Josh Pastner, speaking about journalist and sports talk radio pioneer George Lapides, as published in Memphis Daily journal, on December 28, 2016.
  • As with the first time we stepped into this amazing world — it is the extraordinary intimacy of Elvis's vocal performances that is truly breathtaking, the exquisite and effortless way he takes us on an emotional journey with him, through delicate sensitivity to power and grace all within a magical 3-minute song. You can't imagine how often we heard these songs during the course of this project but I can honestly tell you that every single time Don Reedman and I played each song it really did feel as if we were listening to a private performance held just for us in our own home. Our home is the Abbey Road studio and we were listening to the greatest artist that ever lived.
    • Nick Patrick, co-producer with Don Reedman for "If I can dream" "The Wonder Of You", and Christmas with Elvis" the three albums dovetailing the voice of Elvis Presley with live recording and playing by the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.
  • "Whether one is an Elvis fan or not there is no doubting that no church in Grimsby or any other town, possibly, has ever seen anything like it before, the most moving and joyful service I have ever officiated at. Some people used to think rock and roll was the devil's music but Elvis was a devout Christian."
    • The Reverend Ray Patston's tribute to Elvis' passing, as excerpted from an article entitled "Tributes to Vicar who famously mourned Elvis' death" and published at the Grimsby Telegraph on 19 March, 2015.
  • Designer Peter Blake worked with The Beatles to stage the cover of the "Sgt. Pepper's" album, which was filled with life-size cardboard likenesses of famous figures including Mae West, Bob Dylan, Marlon Brando, Edgar Allen Poe, Fred Astaire, Sonny Liston, Dylan Thomas, Laurel and Hardy and Karl Marx. John Lennon even requested the inclusion of Hitler and Jesus in the artwork, but he was turned down. (As to) Elvis, he did not appear on the album cover because it was felt by the Beatles he was too big an icon to be included.
    • Calum Patum, discussing the auction sale, for 29,000 UK pounds, of the gnome which featured on The Beatles' iconic "Sergeant Pepper's" album cover, as published in the Mail's online edition of 21 April, 2015.
  • I went in, in 1957, and was soon stationed in Germany with Elvis Presley and Gary Crosby – Bing Crosby's son. We were there so I said why don't we start a band, so we didn't have to do any hard work in the service. We tried to get Elvis to join us and I used to see him every day but he wanted to get away from music for a while, while he was in the service. So me and Gary Crosby, we started it and called ourselves the Jazz Blues Symphony Band. As to hearing people talk about Elvis having racial tendencies, that was a lie....
    • Billy Paul, on his time in the Army, as told in ourrockandrollhalloffame
  • I love his voice
    • Luciano Pavarotti, to an UPI reporter who greeted him at Memphis Airport in the spring of 1972
  • Living with my parents in Rapid City, S.D, I was 14 or 15, and Elvis Presley coming to town. This was a month or two before he died. I witnessed women throwing everything onstage -- everything that goes with an Elvis show. It was fascinating."
    • Pat Paxton, President of Entercom's answer to the question of which was the most memorable concert he ever attended, in an interview with Billboard and as published on January 25, 2018.
  • By the early 1960s, only half of the total goal of $500,000 had been raised, so journalists from Hawaii reached out to newspapers across the country for support. Elvis Presley was inspired, and decided to put on a show in remembrance of the men aboard the Arizona and veterans as a whole. There were 4000 available seats for the show, 100 VIP ringside seat tickets which sold for $100 apiece. Using values adjusted for inflation, a VIP ticket cost nearly $800, in 2016 dollars. All of the profits were to be used for the construction of the USS Arizona Memorial. Over 3000 people greeted Elvis upon his arrival at Honolulu International Airport. The concert alone raised $52,000, which was 17% of the total goal for the memorial. While it wasn't enough to completely fund the construction, the performance spread awareness about the fundraiser with an additional $10,000 being personally donated by Elvis and Colonel Parker. Today, people visiting the Arizona Memorial can see the plaque that thanks Elvis and his fans for their contributions to the monument, which was dedicated and built over the next year. The Arizona Memorial today is a symbol of the men aboard the USS Arizona who now stand eternal watch. Attracting over a million visitors annually, the Arizona Memorial makes for an exciting morning of activities....
  • I predict that Elvis Presley's star will fall as quickly as it rose...
    • Drew Pearson, columnist, discussing his impact on society in 1956 as noted in one of his early 1957 NBC TV Washington Merry Go round episodes.
    • [w:Drew Pearson (journalist)|Drew Pearson]], columnist, discussing his impact on society in 1956 as noted in one of his early 1957 NBC TV Washington Merry Go round episodes.
  • Maybe you've heard or seen of him, a country star whose striking accessories -- not to mention his acrobatic voice, are evocative of Elvis.
    • About Orville Peck, a country mmusician who wears a fringed mask that obscures most of his face, in an article by Scottie Andrew and published at CNN's March 5, 2022 onñine edition.
  • I played trombone for Elvis in 1972, on many of his tours that year. In a technical sense – air, attack, tone, key and rhythm, yes he was very very good. He had great gut instincts, tremendous talent and abilities and was not shy about saying what he wanted or when he thought that something was wrong or could be done better. But more important than that is the fact he was an entertainer. He understood his role and knew how to move an audience. His phrasing an expression showed talent that was natural
    • Randall Peede, retired engineering entrepreneur, pro musician and educator, answering a question on whether Elvis was as talented as most people portray him to be and as published on Quora on August 25, 2018.
  • In America, Elvis Presley and Martin Luther King have wonderful memorial museums...
    • Pelé, in his autobiography, after whose release, the idea of a museum of his life was finally born, its opening a year later taking place in Santos, the city that first saw him play.
  • Roald Dahl and Stephen King are my Elvis Presley and my Beatles'
    • PaulPen, Spanish author of literary fiction, thriller and suspense, answering who were his greatest influences, as noted in Papel en blanco̪s Jul 8, 2014 edition
  • In the 1962 film "Kid Gallahad", Presley portrayed a young man just out of the Army, training to be a prizefighter. He was helped on set by boxing trainer Al Silvani and former welterweight champion “Mushy” Callahan. Since the film's release, the location has drawn Presley fans from around the globe. Real estate broker Robin Oates was one of 50 Idyllwild Elementary School students who were extras. He remembers meeting Presley at age 11 and recalls that it was a “big thrill, pulling three or four kids out of our school and have us for the day. We’d go into one of the local restaurants that the film crew rented. Elvis and others from the film crew would throw a football in the street nearby during breaks. One time, several of us were told to stand in a certain area. Then, he appeared out of nowhere and gave us each an autograph. At night, fans would hang out in front of the house where he was staying. In 2016, 54 years after the movie was shot there, visitors continue to come on tour say, from the UK, to see the lodge. Bob Smith, volunteer archivist with Idyllwild Area Historical Society, escorted them. “It was a pilgrimage,” says Smith, with a smile.
    • Julie Pendray, published on November 13, 2016 at Palm Springs life.
  • It was precisely the creation of my chocolat Eiffel Tower, when I was 21, that led me first to Paris, then to Frankfort, in Germany. There I met Catalina Liz, a Spaniard in whose cafeteria I worked, and which was visited several times by Elvis Presley, then with the US Army. He loved my pastries, really.
    • World renown Spanish pastry chef and baker Santiago Perez in an interview for his hometown's Diario de Leon, published on 31 October, 2016
  • This boy had everything. He had the looks, the moves, the manager, and the talent. And he didn't look like Mr. Ed like a lot of the rest of us did. In the way he looked, way he talked, way he acted – he really was different. We have sadly lost the most popular man to have ever walked on this earth since Christ. But even back then, when people would laugh at his sideburns and his pink coat and call him 'sissy' -- he had a pretty hard road to go. In some areas motorcycle gangs would come to the shows. They would come to get Elvis, but he never worried about it. He went right out and did his thing and before the show was over, they were standing in line to get his autograph too. God intended for Elvis Presley to do what he allowed him to do. That's why he made him so good looking. I used to get close to him, tried to find a fault so I could go out and tell the world that he had a big mole back here, but, nah, he had no mole back there. Rock and roll is where it is today because the front door of this studio was opened and that kid walked in here and moved an awesome mountain that sat in the way for people like me who might never have gotten anywhere. And he was my friend..
    • Carl Perkins, as published in www.graceland.com and about education.com
  • I felt there was a man there who truly cared about people. But his life was on a level that my life was not on. I felt like Phillip Dunne [director] fawned all over Elvis. Elvis' attitude was – I saw Elvis looking around that set and summing up people faster than anyone else could have, and I felt that after a short period of time he was disappointed in Phillip Dunne, but he was too polite and well behaved to say anything. He tried very hard to make this film better than his other movies, and you saw him trying and asking questions. And I just believe the sad thing is that [the director] did not have the ability to help Elvis through it. I remember one scene; we were sitting in the truck, and we were supposed to be driving home from a dance or going to a dance, and in the script he was supposed to break into song, turn on the radio and start singing. And to me it was like "yuk," I was very young and I thought, " my sisters are going to tease me, this is so embarrassing and tasteless." You see, I was a snob, too. But – and this was the nicest thing – while we were rehearsing, finally the director walked away, and Elvis looks at me and says, "God, this is so embarrassing. Nobody would ever do this in real life. Why are they making me do this? He never used his star power – never. Maybe he should have. Maybe he did it on some level, but he sure didn't do it on the set. I felt like he was younger than me, this very humble person who would make statements that he believed in. All I know is that there was a person there with a refined heart and soul, and I say refined on any level you want to look at it. When you meet someone like that, you know they're there,The essence of Elvis was a fine person as I've ever met.
    • Actress Millie Perkins, Elvis 'co star in the 1961 film Wild in the Country and who played the role of Gladys Presley in the 1990 TV Miniseries "Elvis".
  • Elvis Presley released hundreds of records throughout a career that spanned slightly more than two decades. He also starred in thirty-one feature films and two documentaries. He was photographed throughout his career, and images of him on film are part of the American visual experience. However, he only sat for one portrait painter, Ralph Wolfe Cowan
    • Warren Perry, Curator at the the National Portrait Gallery, as published at the Smithsonian-s January 8, 2010 edition.
  • I don't like that. I mean, I could understand if I was Elvis Presley.
    • Luke Perry telling RollingStone magazine, in 1992, how he disliked the cult-like following he had gained as one of the lead actors in ̊"Beverly Hills, 90210", mobbed as he was with young girls chasing him wherever he would go and as published in his March 4,2019 Yahoo obituary,
  • You couldn't take your eyes off of him."
    • Joe Perry, lead guitarist for Aerosmith, as published in www.graceland.com
  • I had my head over in it and he came out of the back parking lot and asked if I liked it. I was still standing there with my mouth open but managed to compliment him on his choice. He said that the one which he had just picked was his, but that he will buy me one. So, he caught me by the arm and carried me back to the parking lot where he had come from and told me to pick one out. So I picked a gold and white model that listed for about $11,500 ($81,689.66 in 2019 money). Apparently, he had learned that my birthday was the next Tuesday, so he wished me a Happy Birthday, gave me a check, and the car keys and this inspite of me telling him that my husband Troy and I already owned a Cadillac, a 1974 model. But that didn't bother him, as he then just told me to keep the check, or give it to my husband or whatever we wanted to do with it.
    • Mennie L. Person, an African American bank teller in the Memphis metropolitan area to whom Elvis gave a Caddy, as reported by the Los Angeles Times on July 30,1975
  • He phoned me and asked me if I would mind if he recorded 'The Wonder of You.' I said, 'You don't have to ask permission; you're Elvis Presley.' He said, 'Yes, I do. You're Ray Peterson.
  • I'd never thought much about rock 'n' roll until that moment, when I both caught the Elvis fever and kicked off my love of music. And I never got rid of it. There was a huge crowd, the biggest crowd I've ever seen in the streets of Ocala and then, I swear to God, a line of white Cadillacs pulled in, and I was standing up on a box to see over everyone's head, because a big roar started up when the cars pulled in. Guys in mohair suits began bounding out of each car. Is that Elvis?, I muttered every time. He finally stepped out radiant as an angel. He seemed to glow and walk above the ground. It was like nothing I'd ever seen in my life. At 50 yards, we were stunned by what this guy looked like, and then he came walking right towards uncle Earl, aunt Ellen and little old me!!! I still don't know, to this day, what he said to us, because I was just too dumbfounded. And then he went into his trailer. The day after, I learned all of those early Elvis songs and having that kind of background in rock 'n' roll, of where it had come from, has served me to this day. It became an invaluable thing to have. So for that, I thank him.
    • Tom Petty, recalling how at age 10, he met face to face with Elvis during the filming of "Follow that dream", in Ocala, Florida, in July of 1961.
  • Fany was his country's most famous and finest guitarist. In 1946, he moved to the Republic of South Africa as a migrant miner, recorded with Miriam Makeba, his guitar work not matched there either. Known as the Elvis Presley of the Marrabenta style he is credited with expanding on it with modern influences from Johannesburg.
    • About Fany Pfumo, Mozambican-born singer mainly active in South Africa, considered one of the founders of the Marrabenta music style and scene, as reported in Zambia's Business Day on February 20, 2018
  • His face darkened into a frown, but he managed to finish 'All Shook Up'. Then with his eyes flashing, he pointed to Scotty Moore and addressed the crowd. "He got egg on his guitar, Whoever threw that will never make the Yankeesǃǃ" After a moment's pause, which did not cool his ire, he again faced the crowd 'Most of you people came here to enjoy the show, the guy who threw the egg will never make it. I mean it, Jack, we're just trying to put on a nice show'. The guilty were William Quinn 20, from New York,William B Oates, 21 of Brooklyn, James Stark, 20 of Greenport, New York and John Eidt, 20 of New York City, and they spent the night in jail.
    • The Philadelphia Sunday Bulletins account of the incident involving four Vilanova students during the second of his Philly show in the spring of 1957,as printed on their April 7, 1957 edition.
  • So often in the careers of great men and women of history, there came a point in time where they were told their talents were not sufficient to realize their dreams. In the case of Elvis Presley, these words came early and often. But by the end of the 1950'a he was a musical phenomenon who electrified millions of attendees at his live performances. Until his untimely death in 1977, Elvis had an indisputable role in creating the modern American musical landscape and the development of a unique youth culture. Elvis' importance to the inception of rock and roll, and contemporary music as a whole, cannot be overstated, his image transcending the categories of the music he played and the movies he starred in to become a cornerstone of modern pop culture. Depicted in every material form imaginable, his estate at Graceland remains a pilgrimage site for fans of his music. In February of 1961, at a charity luncheon and concert arranged by the record company with the Governor of Tennessee present, RCA Records presented him with a plaque commemorating the 75 million records he had sold worldwide, the first artist in history to reach this impressive milestone. Accompanying this plaque, RCA Records also gifted Elvis with an 18-karat white gold and diamond Omega wristwatch, purchased by them at Tiffany & Co. The concert itself was an immense success, raising $51,612 (close to a half a million in 2018 dollars) for various charities. Sometime in 1962, the watch was exchanged by Presley to the current owner's uncle after the latter had expressed his admiration for the timepiece during a chance meeting inside a lounge at the Sahara Hotel in Las Vegas. We are proud and thrilled to present, for auction, what once belonged to the man who simply said, in response to questions regarding his popularity, "All I do is sing and dance a little." It is, without a doubt, a superb vintage timepiece with one of the most fascinating provenances to ever appear on the world auction market.
    • Auction house Phillips's laud of Elvis Presley on the eve of the sale, at their Geneva branch, of an historic watch given to Elvis in March of 1961 by RCA after selling the first 75 million records of his career. The auction itself took place on May 12, 2018, the watch selling for US$1.8 million, the largest sum ever paid for an Omega wristwatch.
  • Get yasself a wheelbarrow load of mad hogs, run ’em through the front door, and tell ’em Phillips sentcha. This is Red Hot and Blue comin’ atcha from the magazine floor of the Hotel Chisca. And now we got somethin' new gonna cut lost, DEE-GAWWWW! cut LOOSE! Good people, this is Elvis Presley
    • WHBQ DJ **Dewey Phillips, introducing for the first time the music of the 19-year-old Elvis to the listeners of his "Red, Hot & Blue" show in July of 1954, as recounted in Colin Escott's book, “Good Rockin’ Tonight: Sun Records and the Birth of Rock ‘n’ Roll.”
  • Society, Lord Byron predicted, will eventually narrow into two tribes, “the Bores and Bored.” If so, maybe Elvis should shoulder some blame. The illusion of consensus found in the title of his 1959 collection “50,000,000 Elvis Fans Can’t Be Wrong” — a “customer is always right” moment for pop music — suggests a broad democratic crowd, immune to second-guessing. But not even Elvis would have believed that. Today, the title has been parodied so much — self-deprecatingly (Blues Traveler's “1,000,000 People Can’t Be Wrong”), hubristically (“100,000,000 Bon Jovi Fans Can’t Be Wrong”) — that whatever truth it once contained in Elvis- case is buried beneath geological layers of cynicism.
    • Michael Phillips reviewing the movie "Phantom Thread" for the Chicago Tribune in an article in which he demonizes today's nitpicking audiences and entitled ‘Star Wars‘ nitpickers, Picasso naysayers: When audiences fail artists" as published by the Kaplan Herald on 20 January 2018.
  • But what struck me most was his quality of genuine humility – humility mixed with intense determination. He was, innately, one of the most introverted people who had ever come into the studio, but for that reason one of the bravest, too. He reminded me of many of the great early blues singers who had come to SUN, in fact his insecurity was so markedly like that of a black person. On July 5, 1954, he sang everything he knew – pop stuff, spirituals, just a few words of [anything] he remembered. He watched me intently through the glass of the control room window – I was no longer taping, and in almost every respect this session had to be accounted a dismal failure, but still there was something. Every so often he looked up at me, as if for approval: was he doing all right? I just nodded and said "You're doing just fine. Now just relax. Let me hear something that really means something to you now." Soothing, crooning, my gaze locked into his. Finally they decided to take a break. It was late, he was clearly discouraged, and everybody had to work the next day. Maybe, I thought, they ought to just give it up for the night, come back on Tuesday and try again. Scotty and Bill were sipping Cokes, not saying much of anything. I was doing something in the control room and, as Elvis explained it afterwards, "this song popped into my mind that I had heard years ago, and I started kidding around with [it]. It was an up-tempo song called "That's All Right, Mama", an old blues number by Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup. "All of a sudden," said Scotty, "Elvis just started singing this song, jumping around and acting the fool, and then Bill picked up his bass, and he started acting the fool, too, and I started playing with them. I think I had the door to the control booth open so I stuck my head out and said, 'What are you doing?' And they said, 'We don't know'. 'Well, back up,' I said, 'try to find a place to start, and do it again.'
    • Producer Sam Phillips, on what took place at the SUN studios on July 5, 1954, the day the unusual and timeless musical talent of one Elvis Aaron Presley was discovered, as detailed by writer and Elvis biographer Peter Guralnick in an article on the Independent, published on October 30, 2015.
  • I just love Elvis' singing. And I am his biggest fan
    • US sopaano Marguerite Piazza, in an interview with the AP, after meeting Elvis on October 1, 1957
  • Forty years ago, I had the privilege of studying for a doctorate, at this same university, where you and your wife studied law and I still feel nostalgic about Harvard, about Elvis Presley, about Edgar Allan Poe, and about Martin Luther King. So I toast to you, Mr. President.
    • Chile's President Sebastian Piñera, toasting US President Barack Obama, at the VIP state dinner he offered his opposite number, held at their alma mater in March of 2011, and as recounted and published by Josh Gerstein of POLITICO 44, also present at the dinner.
  • I had successfully shoved all those fantastic automobiles to the back of my mind and had curtailed ‘‘if only’s’ to a passing moment of idle retrospection until I was looking at the autographs on the Autographs Ink stand at the Memorabilia show and realised that if I had kept the cars and had the foresight to have an autograph book handy throughout my career I would be heading into the sunset with my future assured. For instance Elvis Presley. His moniker changes hands at a cool couple of grand and upwards. In 1960 and 1961 was in a karate dojo with him in LA and even got to do a kata or two with him at his home in Perugia Way. And I had a morale advantage over him. He kicked me on the chest once and was terribly apologetic. That was the time when I should have moved in on him and demanded a couple of dozen signatures. In fact, why didn't I whack a load of 10" X 8" in front of him and say “Sign”. LOL
    • Ingrid Pitt,Polish-British actress, author, and writer best known for her work in horror films of the 1960s and 1970s, in her own online page,
  • Once upon a time, all we knew about Elvis was that he sang like a motherfucker; and that was all that mattered; you know, when you gas up and you go to pay inside the gas station and you hear Elvis singing Surrender, (1961), you know that the mystery of that guy, was everything; the voice, and the mystery, and the not knowing; and I think the great thing about anything that you hear over the waves is, you don't want to know too much, you know?
    • Robert Plant, lead singer of Led Zeppelin, explaining to critic Rub Trucks why he loves the mystery of the southern United States, and his debt to Elvis, whose music influenced him the most, as published on the Village Voice, on June 3, 2008
  • After I won my first Masters in 1961, I received an invitation telegram from Elvis. A telegram, not as easy as a text is today. We were playing in Los Angeles and I went to the set of ‘Blue Hawaii’ where Elvis was finalizing the filming. He saw me walk in the room and yelled ‘CUT!’ The gentleman he was, Elvis went and put a jacket before he came to shake my hand. Elvis was just starting to play golf and asked for a few swing tips. He gave me a practice swing, and I swear, it was like a cow giving birth to a roll of barbwire. So, I adjusted his grip and told him he really had to use his hips during the downswing. He said, ‘Baby, you’re talking to the right man.’ And gave us all a little shake. Memories are the cushions on life, but what a gentleman he was. He was my age, yet died so young, a tragedy, a man who could give EVEN so much MORE to society.
    • Gary Player, a national of South Africa widely regarded as one of the best player in the history of golf, as reported by Forbes on December 4, 2018 and kansascity.com/sports/golf/article104157116.html#storylink=cpy
  • A grade schooler in western Kentucky when Elvis came on the scene, I had grown up with his music and movies. When his tragic death occurred in August of 1977, I was a young pastor in middle Tennessee. The following Sunday, my sermon was titled “Heartbreak Hotel.” That morning I shared my grief with many others. Elvis was the type of person such that many who had never seen him in person felt they knew him — personally. Some folks will declare with deep conviction that Elvis led many people astray and that he is burning in hell. Others are just as strongly convinced that, by God's grace and a faith he sang and spoke of, he is in heaven. Daring not to judge or speculate, I can simply hope that he is in heaven. I have no answer to whether there will be concerts in heaven, but the Bible makes it clear that there will be plenty of singing.
    • Steve Playl, a chaplain, columnist, college instructor and former pastor writing for the Bristol Herald Courier, on the 43rd anniversary of Elvis death, in an article entitled "A Sunday afternoon eating at Boonies and remembering Elvis", as published in the said paper's August 22, 2020 edition.
  • Elvis Presley has been described variously as a baritone and a tenor. An extraordinary compass- the so-called register-, and a very wide range of vocal color have something to do with this divergence of opinion. The voice covers two octaves and a third, from the baritone low-G to the tenor high B, with an upward extension in falsetto to at least a D flat. Presley's best octave is in the middle, D-flat to D-flat, granting an extra full step up or down. Call him a high baritone. In "It's'now or never", (1960), he ends it in a full voice cadence (A, G, F), that has nothing to do with the vocal devices of R&B and Country. That A-note is hit right on the nose, and it is rendered less astonishing only by the number of tracks where he lands easy and accurate B-flats. Moreover, he has not been confined to one type of vocal production. In ballads and country songs he belts out full-voiced high G's and A's that an opera baritone might envy. He is a naturally assimilative stylist with a multiplicity of voices – in fact, Elvis' is an extraordinary voice, or many voices.
  • Growing up, Elvis Presley's quasi-gospel ballad "Crying in the Chapel" was the first secular recording allowed inside their strict "Church of God in Christ" home in West Oakland, California. Ruth, Anita, Bonnie, and June were only allowed to listen to the radio on Sundays and on top of that, it had to be gospel stations. Years later, Anita, reflected on the fact that it was "so unbelievable that someone like Elvis Presley could relate to the story in their song 'Fairytale' and want to record it". She thought Elvis "did it beautifully and was very pleased with his version, capturing the emotion in the song", as he did. Ruth "also spoke positively of Elvis's final album 'Moody Blue' and defended him against charges of any cultural appropriation"
    • About the Pointer Sisters and their love for Elvis music, ever since they heard "Crying in the chapel", a gospel song whose Elvis version their mother liked very much, following an interview with Ken Sharp, for his book "Writing for Elvis".
  • One of Elliott's properties is the Rail Haven Inn/Best Western. at 203 S. Glenstone Ave., which has a unique room — one that attracts travelers from out-of-state as well as locals. It's the Elvis Room — where a 21-year-old Elvis Presley stayed in 1956 after a performance at Springsfield's Shrine Mosque. As far as anyone knows, the room suffered no damage.
    • Steve Pokim writing for the Springfield News Leader, in an article published on 13 January 2008 and entitled @Why's it so difficult for Springfield residents to book at Springfield. MO hotels?"
  • Think of Elvis Presley’s home, Graceland- It was once just a house, now it’s a shrine.
    • Joshua Pollard, British archaeologist's explanation for why since the neolythic times people have commemorated homes with stone monuments, as is the case in the Avebury henge containing the world’s largest stone circle, in an article published in the New Scientist̪s 10 April 2019 edition
  • When I was a kid, we moved from Canada to the US, first to Pasadena, then to Palm Springs. This guy who lived across the street was the PS's airport manager and he really liked us, so he’d tip us off when famous people were flying in. One day, he told us Elvis Presley was flying in at 3 p.m. and if we showed up we could meet him. He let us ride with our bikes on the tarmac and then, this private plane landed, the steps came down and... there was Elvis. We ran towards him and he picked me up and swung me around, hugged my sister, signed autographs, and talked to us. Finally, one of his guys told him they had to go, but as they drove off, he rolled down his window and waved goodbye to us all the way down the road. He was so nice, really cool and it was so great to meet him and shake his hand..
    • Singer Steve Poltz, reflecting on his younger days and on songwriting, in an interview with Tom Lounges for 2ONE9, as published on November 10, 2016.
  • The emergent cultural wars between Mexico and the US over rock 'n' roll, however, took a dramatic turn on 19 February 1957 when a comment gleaned from an alleged border interview with Elvis Presley appeared in Mexico's largest newspaper, "Excelsior", in which the rock 'n' roll star was quoted as saying, "I'd rather kiss three black girls than a Mexican." Two days later, a Mexican woman was quoted in the same column as saying, "I'd rather kiss three dogs than one Elvis Presley." At first unnoticed by the public at large, this exchange soon unleashed a torrent of anti-Presley criticism, his records were burnt at the Zocalo, and he was denied radio airplay, all of which while sustaining a powerful backlash against Presley and the mass media itself. Most people now dismiss the remark as completely false, some even attributing it to an act of political vengeance against him. In fact, it had been started by a high-up Mexican tycoon who wanted to contract Presley for a private birthday party, for which he sent him a blank check to fill in as he wished. Presley, according to the story, returned the blank check, so the tycoon, extremely offended, and with the help of a top politician, invented the storyline about Elvis not liking Mexican women.
    • Herbe Pompeyo, of PolyGram Records' Mexican branch, explaining how the first of eventually four Elvis bans (airplay in 1957, stores in 1959, theatres in 1961 and finally entrance into the country, in late 1962), came into being and as referenced in page 42 of the book "Elvis Refried" by Eric Zolev. The tycoon's identity has yet to be disclosed but the politician was thought to have been the 3 term Mayor of Mexico City, Ernesto P Uruchurtu, "The Iron Regent", as he was called, who was in turn the nephew of Senator Manuel Uruchurtu Ramírez, who later gained international notoriety for being Mexico's only passenger at the RMS Titanic.
  • Once a year Parkes, a sleepy mining town in rural Australia, explodes into colour and song hosting a five-day festival and extravaganza to celebrate Elvis Presley, now billed as the southern hemisphere’s biggest tribute to the superstar. The town’s transformation extends beyond this year’s Parkes Elvis Festival generating A$13 million (US$9.3 million) for the local economy as more than 27,000 people visited to attend some 200 themed events. "It’s helped the whole economy", noted Parkes Motel owner Andrew Porter of the frenzied growth in tourists. The New South Wales state government is projecting an injection of Aus $43 million (US̩30.6 million) into the wider region surrounding Parkes this year due to the festival, a much-needed source of income amid a severe drought as the event has helped develop Parkes' service economy – and its numbers. This extends to the sporting field with another regular fixture – a rugby game – featuring teams with players wearing copies of his trademark white jumpsuit. The population has increased by four percent to around 12,000 in the past decade, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, in sharp contrast to the declining or static trend in other regional and rural towns. Inspired by the Parked Elvis Festival huge success, other small towns have started their own events such as the ABBAFestival in nearby Trundle and the Bob Marley Festival in Kandos, said University of Wollongong Human Geography expert Chris Gibson, who has compiled a database of some 2,800 festivals across the country...
    • Andy Porter and Chris Gibson, as interviewed for the Free Malaysia Today, on the impact of the Elvis Parkes, Australia yearly Festival, as noted on their January 24, 2019 edition in an article entitled ̊"All shook up: How Elvis keeps Aussie outback town alive"
  • Steve Sholes, who produced the session, said, “Roll the tape.” And I said, “But I haven't heard the song yet!” And he said, “Roll the tape, Bill!” and I look and the studio is totally black out there. I can't see a thing. I said, “You're kidding!” He said, “No, roll the tape!”. So, I roll the tape and I don't know what's going to happen. And a guitar starts off, and then a bass comes in, and Elvis starts singing. And I still can't see a thing in the studio. And I'm afraid to turn any mikes off because somebody may come in and start playing. All of a sudden, Elvis stops singing and just starts talking. And I say to myself, “This is awful!” because you don't normally put a lot of echo on dialogue. And I thought, next take I'll just turn it down, so we just did the take all the way through. If you listen to the dialogue, the echo matches the effect, because he says, “And the stage is bare, and I'm standing there…”. Later, I said, “How about that echo?”. Sholes said, “Screw the echo, that's a hit!”. And it was done in one take...
    • Bill Porter, RCA`s foremost recording engineer and one of the creators of "The Nashville Sound", explaining to Michael Fermer how "Are you lonesome tonight" (1960) came into being, with the lights totally turned off, at Elvis´ insistence so as to create the best atmosphere possible, but without Porter knowing about it. (Published in MusicAngle.com)
  • This was a white kid in the 1950s going on Beale Street, learning from masters of black music like Roy Hamilton, Jackie Wilson and others. He was different, interesting, but not something you felt the magnitude of at first – not until you heard Dewey Phillips playing 'That's All Right' on [his radio show] 'Red, Hot & Blue'. Hearing what he was doing, singing black music with a confidence and a uniqueness, made me and other African-American talents say, 'This guy has something'. And he did! We felt that maybe he was opening up a market that had been not fully opening up to black music, breaking down barriers to a greater appreciation of what black music truly was. That opened up more doors for artists like Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Fats Domino, Brook Benton and so many others. We felt that maybe he was opening up a market that had been not fully opening up to black music, breaking down barriers to a greater appreciation of what black music truly was. That opened up more doors for artists like Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Fats Domino, Brook Benton and so many others. He was soulfully expressing the songs with an r'n'b flair, showing what black music was through his perspective. What Elvis did for me was cement in my mind the great potential reach of r'n'b and soul music. The credibility that he bought to it, whether he viewed it that way or not, doesn't matter, because this was the net result. What Elvis did for me was cement in my mind the great potential reach of r'n'b and soul music. The credibility that he bought to it, whether he viewed it that way or not, doesn't matter, because this was the net result.This documentary gives the complete picture of the person, his greatness, some of his secrets, some of his ups, some of his downs and an abundance of his power. And people would love to see how much of a production role Elvis had in the music that he made.
    • David Porter, African American record producer, songwriter, singer, entrepreneur and philanthropist, speaking about the documentary "Elvis The Searcher", an HBO 2018 production.
  • I think Elvis was just a beautiful singer He had the swag. He had the sauce.
    • Rapper Post MaloPost Malone, in an interview with Spin, published on 20 November 2017
  • The 21st century is beginning to see (and hear) things differently, though, and many of us now take a broader view of Caruso's art and achievement (and thus) when Ben Watt compares the great tenor with Elvis Presley is a sign of more enlightened times. The digital age gives us unfettered access to the whole of music, unfiltered by snobbery and tradition, and perhaps Caruso can be released from the stale old classical ghetto. In his time, he was indeed as good as Elvis.
    • John Potter, UK tenor and academic, as published on Highbrow magazine on 26 August 2019 in an article entitled "As Hip as Elvis: Caruso the Pop Idol"
  • I'm customized to do everything I shouldn't do, I've learned all that I know by stubbornness and (the) blue I got my schooling more or less on the street, My eyes have seen a thing or two. And though my heart has made me weary,I like everything about you, yes I do, yes I do, yes I do, yes. I like the way you look, the way that you talk I like the way that you move when you walk, My mind is set on you,My pelvis is on fire And I can't shake it off
    • Michael Poulsen's 2019 song dedicated to Elvis Presley, as noted in an article published on Loudwire's July 26, 2019 edition.
  • Elvis was a (Gospel) singer par excellence. On "Milky White Way", (1960), he' got the strength of a bassman and the sweetness of a tenor. The heritage we have in Elvis' gospel music is a gift to the world.
  • There was a real threat of danger, a cold war with an iron curtain and there was a Soviet army stacked up on the other side, so those were serious times. He was just another soldier, he was Elvis Presley but at the same time they assigned him in accordance with the needs of the service and unlike others who have gone in the military from celebrity life and essentially used their talents to entertain troops, he was a scout. Despite living in a house "off post", when it came to the field Elvis Presley was not a celebrity and I think his fellow soldiers respected him for his dedication even though he was as famous as he was. When I met him, he was out in the field and he was recognized for his professional performance in the Third Division which I, interestingly, subsequently commanded 28 years later and it occupied the shallowest part of NATO battle front. Elvis' unit and my unit were in that division and we had the toughest job and it was a time of heightened tension. Anyway, we were in this wooded area and I was driving along in my jeep and somebody noted that, there he was. When I walked over to him he saluted and was very proper and what struck me was that he looked just like another GI. Other than the fact that he was REALLY Elvis Presley, he acted, and I saw him, as just another soldier, in the woods, kind of dirty, doing a job..."
    • General Colin Powell, former Chairman of the US Joint Chief of Staff and Secretary of State, abridged from his autobiography My American Journey and a BBC interview, in 2005.
  • The Denver Zoo hopes that 11-year-old polar bear, Cranbeary may be expecting. But to be sure, staff sent a sample of her poop to an expert at predicting polar bear pregnancies – Elvis, a beagle working with the Cincinnati Zoo. It is nearly impossible to determine if polar bears are pregnant through traditional tests, so zoos are trying this new approach. Denver Zoo is one of 17 zoos with possibly-pregnant polar bears that have gathered up samples for Elvis to examine. Elvis has a 97 percent success rate in determining polar bear pregnancy and we are anxiously waiting to find out if Cranbeary the polar bear might become a momma bear this year!
    • Erin Powell and Kyle Clark, reporting for NBC's Channel 9 News on the extraordinary power to confirm polar bears' pregnancies of a dog named after Elvis, as aired on October 26, 2018.
  • As to Elvis, some experts believe that the release of music he did not approve in life can reward his fans, but at the same time could end up hurting his legacy over the long term. While alive, he almost always only released music he thought was great but after his death, many of the songs he thought were not, were released on new albums. This is one reason many artists prefer to keep their material under wraps forever.
    • PPCORN, in an article entitled "From Amy Winehouse to the Beatles: Six Controversies Over Posthumous Albums", as published on February 6, 2018.
  • When you got the last name Presley everybody's gonna get the question, are you related to Elvis? Well, my granddaddy and Elvis' granddaddy where brothers. In fact mine carried Elvis and Gladys down to visit Vernon, his daddy, at the state penitentiary, when he did a little time for altering a check
    • Brandon Presley, Elvis second cousin, born on the same year of Elvis' death, Mayor of Nettleton, MS, and its Public Service Commissioner for Northern Mississippi, in an article published at the Washington Examiner on August 26, 2018
  • I would continue to do the Elvis Presley show because it is something that's been in my life for years and I won't let it down,
    • Elvis D. Presley, the Libertarian Party' candidate for Arkansas' 1st Congressional District in the U.S. House's 2018 elections, in an article published on The Daily Dot̪s November 3, 2018 edition.
  • It hit home when I turned 42 as that was the age when my father died. I have moments when I wish he had lived to see my children, and I speak to my little ones about him. I tell them who he was and we all love his music.
    • Lisa Marie Presley, wishing her children Danielle, Benjamin, Harper and Finley had met her dad, in an interview with Leah Simpson of Digital Spy, and published on 17 October of 2012
  • i) I still find myself captivated by many of Elvis's songs, his style of translating lyrics with music giving the listener the sense that even though he's singing, he's speaking his feelings and living them throughout the song. When I listen to “Don’t,” which he recorded when he was only 22-years-old, I can't imagine anyone else singing this heartfelt song with such an emotional connection to the words. ii)his taste was so diverse. Yes, country, rhythm and blues, black music, but he also loved opera and Bach and Brahms. By setting his vocals in a pop-classical context, I wanted to expose him in a way that he never had the opportunity to — wanted to, but never was able to...
    • Priscilla Presley, explaining her decision to produce the two albums which dovetail Elvis voice with the sound of Royal Philarmonica-
  • I never saw a guitar player that was worth a damn...
    • Vernon Presley,'s retort to his son the moment he found out he had SERIOUSLY decided to pursue a life in music, in an interview for "Elvis on Tour", in 1972.
  • Elvis laughed, cried, worried about people. He had a generous streak as long as the mighty Mississippi and delighted in being able to help people. He could be angry, funny, sad or happy, just like everyone else. He had all these little traits just like other people, but he was a lot more too. He became a part of our lives and even with his closely guarded privacy, he drew us into his life so willingly and lovingly that he was, in fact, a part of each and every one of us. He made us sing because of his songs, he made us cry at every pain, either mental or physical that he bore, he made us laugh at every little grin he gave, but most of all, he made us love because he gave us love. He gave us himself and asked us for nothing in return.
  • I was about 10 years old, the first time I heard Elvis Presley's voice, pouring from my father's car radio, in East St. Louis, Illinois; I can't recall the song, whether it was a ballad or a rocker (but), what I remember is how his voice, that smoldering rumble of a voice, made my skin tingle; I don't know why, but I just loved his voice, his sound just did something to me.
    • Ilva Price, an African American now living in West Memphis, TN, recalling how her father, angry about rumours (later found by "Jet" magazine to be fabricated), that Presley had stolen their music and was a racist, quickly turned off the radio when he noticed her daughter's reaction to his voice, then called him a "cracker", a racial epithet as disgusting as any other, as told in an interview with Boston Globe staffer Renee Graham, and published in that paper on August 11, 2002
  • Elvis recorded “Lawdy Miss Clawdy” and, at every show, he played it. The Beatles, Paul McCartney, John Lennon, Fats Domino, James Brown —all the big acts who have ever recorded rock ‘n’ roll at one time recorded it. It was the first rock ‘n’ roll song that made me a teenage idol with both blacks and whites. In 1952, it was called race music. What opened the gate here in America for race music was that generation of young white boys and girls, but when Elvis got in, he opened the door that much wider. In fact, all the chords are the same, they're not black and white, unless it's on paper. The music and melodies never change.
    • Lloyd Price, discussing Elvis in Sumdumhonky: Chatting With Lloyd Price, for tyhe Huffington Post on 08/26/2015.
  • He was breathtaking, really, it was very difficult to focus..
    • Pat Priest's answer to the question of how hard it was to play a movie scene with Elvis, as told in a retrospective of his motion picture career, held at Graceland in August of 2017.
  • i) I realize I'm part of a musical history and I revere the legacy of my predecessors, so, for instance, when playing live I'll do some of their bombs, or say, we play "Jailhouse Rock" as a tribute to Elvis. So why Elvis you ask? Well, I was brought up in a black and white world. I dig black and white; night and day, rich and poor, man and woman. I listen to all kinds of music and I want to be judged on the quality of my work, not on what I say, nor on what people claim I am, nor on the color of my skin. ii) I met Elvis Presley at the Dick Clark show at Circus Circus in Las Vegas, a place where a great musical extravaganza with some of the greatest artists of the day always would appear. We were sitting in the audience and Jackie Wilson had just finished his set and then Dick Clark came out, but before he introduced the next act he wanted to announce someone special had arrived, "Ladies and Gentlemen" The lights went down and all of a sudden spotlights went to the back of the room. I looked around and it was Elvis, He was looking cool and wearing shades. He snatched his shades off as if saying "Hello Everybody!, then came walking down the aisle to his table and he saw Louise, stopped said "Hi Louise. Hi Nikki" and they started talking. I stood up and he said "Hi." I said "Hi, I'm Pepe. It's nice to meet you." I shook his hand. He said something else to Louise, and then said "See you later" and went to his table. By the time I was in Las Vegas, I had already met tons of celebrities-- Ray Charles, Stevie Wonder, Patti LaBelle and the Bluebells, Dionne Warwick and Wayne Newton. I also met Ike and Tina Turner. I drank champagne with Adam Clayton Powell and I met Redd Foxx but, when I saw Elvis, I said, now that man's a star. It was a different kind of thing."
    • Prince, answering a reporter on why would he cite Elvis Presley as one of his influences, from an interview with "Guitar World", published in October of 1998.ii) about Prince's former mentor, Pepe Willie, talking in a phone interview on May 12, 2013
  • The Prince de Galles has counted among its guests Winston Churchill, Marlene Dietrich Elvis Presley and Pele to name but a few of the long list. It is located in Avenue George V, and it's the eastern neighbour of the Hotel George V. – named after the King of England, who, as we all know, was the father of the Prince of Wales. The two hotels, however, bear no family relationship...
    • Hôtel Prince de Galles's description in the Library of Hospitalities' main publication, entitled the World̪s Greatest Hotels, in famoushotelsorg.
  • ( That night) after eleven o'clock, Tony Prince took over on ( Radio) Luxembourg. Dazed, frequently in tears, just quietly playing Elvis records and reminiscing into the small hours, as long as it took him to negotiate his grief. The world stopped for a little while. Not long afterwards, it was time for me to return to school, for the start of my third year, when we were supposed to start taking this education thing seriously. There was some gentle mocking on the part of my classroom peers over Elvis' passing, and it struck me that, for nearly everyone my age (or so it seemed), Elvis didn't speak for them, or to them. It's fair to say that the girls in my class tended to like Abba, Boney M, ELO and David Soul, whereas the boys went for Genesis, Queen, AC/DC and Rush. Elvis was somebody your parents liked, regarded as something of a square. I am not sure whether any of these artists came close to sniffing Elvis shoes, never mind filling them, and in any case nor could they have done; as only Elvis could have unbolted the door, made the impact on life – not just on music – that he did. If the postwar generation wanted to burn, not just forget, “the war,” and not grow up as robotic replicas of their parents, Elvis was the active agent who forced newness through to that society." ii) When in 1972, I was made president of the Elvis Presley fan club, we took 200 fans to Vegas to see him. Parker invited 11 of us down to the dressing room and suddenly there he was, leaning against the wall. He had a black suit on, and the first thing that hit you was how handsome the guy was. He came over and was very polite, and I started to interview him for my show, The following year I went back, taking my programme director Ken Evans with me. Elvis was one of the few stars Ken had never met. To return the favour, when we arrived in LA, he took my wife Christine and I to spend an afternoon with Mae West. She gave us some carrot cake and tea. Elvis yesterday, Mae West today. We were buzzing! Tony Prince for the Guardian, published on 4 December 2016. Unquote
    • i) About Radio Luxemburg's Tony Prince' reaction to Elvis´ death ii) Tony Prince, for the Guardian, published on 4 December 2016.
  • My Fellowship took me to the USA and UK looking at local history – my research problem was to ask where will the next generation of volunteers come from to manage our historical societies – what programs have been successfulin “firing up” a passion for local history? From there, it took me to historical societies scattered amongst the “knee high by the 4th of July” corn fields of Indiana, to Nashville where the American headquarters of local history sits between the Civil War and Elvis Presley, to Illinois, to Washington, to Troy in New York State, New York City, London and finally Norfolk. It was a brilliant mix of the “grass roots” to the more established; from country societies to more urban;from entirely volunteer run, to historical societies with eighty staff; from the “can do”culture in the USA, to well funded from the Heritage Lotter and , policy driven programs in the UK.
    • Kate Prinsley, from the Association of Victoria (CFAV),in Australia, recalling her time in the United States as the 2009 Churchill Fellow.
  • He was good. I mean, all the girls liked him, and there is a film of that performance, somewhere.
    • David Pristash, author of "Diary of a Special Forces Trooper in Vietnam, 1967," recalling for Brian Albrecht of "The Plain Dealer" the time he saw the then relatively unknown Elvis perform at his alma mater, the Brooklyn High School, near Cleveland, in an article entitled "John Wayne, Elvis and ‘The Deer Hunter: A Green Beret’s Vietnam service was nothing like the movie" and as published in their January 20, 2019 edition.
  • My biggest influence because of his charisma and sheer, pure talent was Elvis Presley. He still influences me today, actually, and with the help of the internet I can watch videos of him performing live anytime I want.
    • Canadian Country Music artist Aaron Pritchett, when asked who were his early musical heroes and what inspires him, currently, as published on the 15 January, 2015 online edition on 24Hrs, Vancouver,
  • He was in Miss Scriverner's home room with me. She was always bragging about how he would make it big one day. When he won the talent show singing “Old Shep”, she went on and on about it for days. Little did we all know that what she predicted for Elvis would come true in such a huge way.
    • Mary Ann Props, Humes High School, Class of 1953, recalling their home teacher predictions.
  • I dont think as far a screen image is concerned, there is no one like him
    • Juliet Prowse in an intervbiew in connexion with the 1993 Elvis stanp.
  • Elvis had the biggest impact on me, he captured and embodied the whole thing. He had that rockabilly, rock and roll, pop and ballad thing. He was all wrapped up into one for me. I loved listening to “Heartbreak Hotel” and “Don’t Be Cruel,” and I just looked forward to each and every new song that came out.”
    • Gary Puckett lead singer of the Union Gap, explaining to interviewer Rob Nagy, how Presley struck a musical chord for him, early in his career, as published by "The Mercury", on September 8, 2014
  • He had gone through the divorce with Priscilla, but he was definitely there to work. And this guy could do anything vocally. He could croon with Sinatra or scream with Little Richard. And what (I) admired the most about Presley -- then and now -- was his intelligence. especially when it came to human emotions.
    • Norbert Putman, speaking to the Houston Press, on what it meant to play bass with Presley at his 1974 Stax Studous sessions, in Memphis, as published on August 1, 2013.

Q[edit]

  • The greatest voice of all time.
    • "Q" magazine judging panel´s laud of Elvis Presley, from a poll published on their March 4, 2007 issue.
  • My own musical ambitions were born when I was five, watching the Ed Sullivan Show on TV. When Elvis Presley burst on to the screen, singing 'Don't Be Cruel,' I felt my first sexual thrill, though I didn't know what it was at the time.
    • Suzi Quatro, as noted by brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/elvis_presley.html

R[edit]

  • Based on our company's recent growth, his items have resonated with shoppers, with overall sales in the previous 52-week period ending January 22, 2017 advancing 26% as a result of sale of products bearing his name alone. His is one of the fastest-growing segments in the beauty industry.
    • David Raccuglia, founder and CEO of American Crew, a subsidiary of Revlon, the US top seller in the men's grooming business, explaining the effect Presley products are having in his company's successes and as told in a WWD article on March 31, 2017
  • When I was riding the bus to school every morning, I would usually see Elvis sitting at the corner of Alabama and Poplar, listening to a black man in a chair playing a guitar. He wanted to play and sing like that man. He was a country boy with big dreams. After he became famous he did something to thank every person who ever helped him in any way.
    • Mattie Rainey, Humes High School Class of 1953, on Elvis interest for the blues.
  • At age 25, Lennon wrote “Run For You Life,” a jealous, immature rant inspired by Elvis Presley's recording of Arthur Gunter's “Baby, Let’s Play House,” a song written from the perspective of a spurned lover who wants his former girlfriend with college aspirations to return to him. Elvis performed it live with hips a-thrusting, leaving little doubt as to what he had in mind by “house play.” In the last verse Elvis delivers this dire warning: “Now listen to me, baby, try to understand, I’d rather see you dead little girl than to be with another man.” Lennon's song picks up where “Baby, Let’s Play House” finishes, Most disturbingly, at the end of the song Lennon emphasizes his seriousness: “Let this be a sermon, I mean everything I’ve said; baby, I’m determined and I’d rather see you dead.
    • Joe Raiola, Senior Editor, MAD magazine, as published in The Huffington Post on 10 October 2016
  • The 2018 Pohottuwa Party victory is a Mahinda Rajapaksa victory. At all election rallies, the former President was cheered like mad when he arrived on the platform. It reminded me of Elvis Presley, who was virulently hated and deeply loved in equal proportions throughout his career. But Elvis did not care, he continued singing.
    • About Mahinda Rajapaksa, former Sri Lankan President, in an article written by Kamalika Pieris and published at the Lankaweb on 30 March, 2018
  • I grew up playing sports and listening to Elvis Presley, whose music I favored; in fact, when an opera singer came on the "Ed Sullivan Show", I'd think 'Turn this off,'"
    • Samuel Ramey, the world's top bass baritone, as told to "Opera News", and published in ENotes.Com
  • My favourite artists have always been Elvis and The Beatles and they still are!
    • Johnny Ramone's preferences as far as rock music is concerned,as reported in Far Out's January 17, 2022 edition from an 2003 intervew.
  • A singer, at work, is usually thinking only about making it through the song without flubbing it. Look what's involved: breathing plausibly, remembering the lyrics, nailing the high notes, staying with your band or chorus, maintaining a soulful facial expression and looking good. You might also be whacking a guitar. And -- because Presley did -- you also have to move, oscillate, arm-wrestle with the microphone, throttle it, skid across the stage on your knees, fling your head back and spread your arms; and then you want to salt it with what you possess of art...he flings his voice up beyond the grip of gravity, and then surrenders, like a skater in a leap.
    • Catherine Rankovic, poet, essayist, instructor, as well as manuscript editor and music and writing coach, as excerpted from her review of Presley`s live performance of "I want you, I need you, I love you", in the "Steve Allen Show", (1956), and as published in "The Missouri Review", Volume XXIV, Number 2, 2001
  • Musicians like Elvis Presley and Whitney Houston were strongly rooted in gospel music and in the same vein, many musicians of Christian faith begin their musical journey young. In fact, lessons and performances take place in and around the church.
    • Hindu writer Chatura Rao, discussing Gospel music being a gateway for young professional musicians in her country, over the years, in an article published by The Hindu on 21 December 2017.
  • I would have loved to sing a duet with my childhood idols, Elvis and Piaf. And I will soon, thanks to new technology
    • Raphael in an interview with Europa Press, on 06/10/2014
  • I've always said I wish my life could be like an Elvis movie, say "Roustabout and "King Creole. And that if "Cold Case" came back today, and we could could reunite, that we somehow were able to discover that Elvis is still alive.
    • Jeremy Ratchford in an interview with the Standard, answering what could be different if CBS's Cold Case,in which he starred, came back in 2018, as published on 27 July 2018.
  • i) In the early 1950's I DJ'ed in a radio program called "Hillbilly Bandwagon". This was before country music was called country music. So, one day, a guy walks in by the name of Elvis Presley. This was before he was really famous, age 19, I guess. He had come to plug his records at our station, so I had a brief conversation with him. Of course, I was always very proud to have met him, but my wife when I told the story too often, she finally looked at me, smiled as only a wife can smile, and said "I can beat that, HOG...."", That is how she calls me when she is going to tell me something awesome, and that was when I found out my wife had dated Elvis when she was 16 years old. And now she never ceases to remind me, you know, that if things had gone differently, Elvis Presley would be alive today and anchoring the CBS News ii) Fidel Castro could have been Cuba's Elvis.
    • Dan Rather i) in an 1994 interview with David Letterman and ii) in Townhall, published on the day after Castro's passing.
  • We don’t mail Elvis a Social Security check, no matter how many people think he is alive.
    • Jonathan Rauch, author and activist, in a 2017 essay for National Review entitled “The Constitution of Knowledge, as published in the News Tribune on October 14th, 2018
  • When I think about my family, I listen to André Rieu, a violinist and conductor who is very popular in Europe ( but), when I think about living like it’s my last day on earth, I listen to Elvis Presley
    • Gabriele Rausse, Director of Gardens and Grounds at Monticello, Thomas Jefferson’s former home and experimental farm in Charlottesville, Va, in an interview to the New York Times and published in the paper's Sunday Review on March 14, 2015.
  • I’m inclined to sympathize with Presley in the controversy he’s stirred up. He’s accused of inciting juvenile delinquents. That’s ridiculous. You can’t tie a delinquent kid to a hit record by Presley. Charges against him are unfounded, unfair, and bigoted. People resent his success. He’ll be around a lot longer than most of them think. And his records have stimulated a controversy that’s helped the whole record industry—we have Elvis to thank.”
    • Johnnie Ray, in an interview in Germany, later published by Variety on its August 21, 1957, issue.
  • My mom ans her sisters sang in churches and in 1956 there was an Elvis tour in Arkansas and he asked them to sing back-up for him. Unreal.....
    • Collin Raye, recalling the time when her mother sang for Elvis in Arkansas, in 1956, as told in Center Stage with the stars, Episode 1, on youtube
  • Historically famous as the birthplace of Elvis, the small northeastern Mississippi city of Tupelo is now also known as an amazing place to live. Forming a triangle with Memphis and Nashville, Tupelo shares a lot of similarities with the two booming cities – including an incredible musical scene, culinary hot spots, and rich history – but unlike its two unchecked growth neighbors to the north, Tupelo has retained all of its character, charm, and, happily, low prices.
    • Reader's Digest's laud of Tupelo, MS which the magazine listed as one of the “15 Best Places to Move to in the U.S. (Before They Get Too Crowded),” in an article penned by Melissa Klurman as part of its October 2018 US edition.
  • One Friday night, Tapp and the "Hee Haw" honchos were flying to Hollywood, with the flight stopping in Memphis. So they were sitting in first class, taking up almost all the seats and on came Elvis Presley with his entourage including Col. Parker, with Tapp now sitting beside Presley. He sat across from them, kept looking and finally said, ‘Why do I know you? Is it from on a show?” Presley told Tapp. Yes, Tapp said, It is ""Hee Haw". “You hear that?? They’re from Hee Haw!!!!” the King told his court. “We stop our show everyday until Hee Haw’s over, then we proceed,” Presley said. “It was quite a compliment,” Tapp said, smiling.
    • James Reany, recalling Gordie Tapp's encounter with Elvis Presley. Tapp was a Canadian producer, entertainer, and better known as the writer of the television program "Hee Haw", as published in IFP Press, on 9 September 2016.
  • The 146.5 million cumulative RIAA Album Awards, spanning 101 separate Gold (or higher) albums, makes Elvis the earner of the most Gold and Platinum Album Awards of any artist in the history of the RIAA
  • I'd already discovered black music with Big Jay McNeely at the Blue Sax in North Hollywood and made the blues-jazz connections, so I wanted to experience this Elvis thing. He was a support act to Freddy Martin at the Frontier, a fancy supper club that we couldn't afford. So I persuaded the guys to pool cash and we came up with $10, then charmed a waitress to let us dine on rolls while we watched the show. From the moment Presley started with “Hound Dog”, I was a convert. It was electrifying, a validation, to see these stuffed-shirt socialites who'd come to see Freddy Martin clamp up in reverence. I thought, Hey, a kid with nothing, from nowheresville, can do this!”
    • Robert Redford, as told to author Michael Feeney Callan in the 2020 bio entitled Robert Redfoird a biography"
  • Channeling our inner Elvis with some help from the best in the business. What a night .
    • Jamie Redknapp's 13 April 2022 message to television viewers for an episode of UK's A league of our own.
  • There's something a little unsettling, a little frightening, about the best and earliest music recorded by Elvis Presley. I'm thinking about the magical and mystical Sun Records recordings from 1954 and 1955, about the obviously haunting "Blue Moon" and about the lonely, lonely "Tomorrow Night", but I'm also thinking about the more upbeat "Mystery Train" whose haunted history reaches back to Junior Parker, the Carter Family, and deep into the haunted places of American music, both black and white. The music is spare, almost hollow. Elvis's voice is at once both youthful and ancient, exuberant and lost, its echo like a shadow cast upon the ages.
    • Gregory L.Reece, reviewing 'The Land of Grace' a novel by Mike Burrell for PopMatters, as published on September 12, 2018.
  • In 1958 at the age of 17 Otis started his professional singing career, briefly touring with the “Pat Tea Cake” band before forming his own band, “The Pinetoppers” in 1959, with well known Macon guitarist Johnny Jenkins. The Pinetoppers performed Elvis songs and country music songs in the Macon area. They also toured on the “Chitlin’ circuit," a network of black nightclubs throughout the Southeast and the white frat house circuit across the Deep South.
  • In 1968, he moved into Las Vegas quickly. He bought a piece of land across from the Flamingo Hotel. It was 80 acreHe was originally the landlord for that property, and he made millions on that deal. He then shortly thereafter bought an off-strip property, the first one that had ever been done.That’s where the International Hotel was built. It was a very, very expensive property at the time, it was off-strip. The first two people to appear in the show room there were Barbara Streisand and Elvis Presley and that was the beginning of Kirk Kerkorian’s ascension as the largest power broker in Las Vegas.
    • Nevada Senator Harry Reed, at the floor of the US Senate on the death of Las Vegas resident and mega resort builder Kirk Kerkorian, in an eulogy delivered on June 16, 2016
  • The first time I met him I was blown away, I just looked at him and said, 'damn, you about the best looking thing I ever did see, kinda wish I was a girl right now, Elvis.
  • He did have talent, that excitement. We knew the effect he had on future singers and players. I ran out and bought a guitar after I saw him.
    • Lou Reed, guitarist, vocalist, and principal songwriter of the rock band the Velvet Underground, as noted on elvis-express.com/ology_home.html
  • A decision to get vaccinated isn’t made by each of us, individually, looking at available information and making a choice for ourselves. In other words, it’s not necessarily about the evidence. It’s about something bigger. People tend to respond to community norms. If we think about it, it’s somewhat logical. We tend to look to people who we think are either similar to us or who share our beliefs. There have been previous public health campaigns, for instance, that provided information from breast cancer to polio. In fact, in a more unified era, giving Elvis Presley his polio vaccine during a staged photo op attempted the same feat.
    • Jennifer Reich, Professor of Sociology at the University of Colorado in Denver, commenting on why people refuse to take the COVID vaccine in an article entitled "Colorado is betting big on vaccine influencers. It’s unclear if people will “like” their message" as published in the Colorado Sun September 1, 2021 edition
  • I am a big fan of Elvis music. He shaped the future of rock and roll and I would take my daughter and my mum who is 85 and lots more family and friends to Graceland. It would be a great trip
    • Peter Reid, English soccer coach and former player, in an interview with Jet Party-s Roadshow which included a question and answers session about his favourite places to travel to.
  • Then, like Alice through the looking glass, I stepped through a door still bearing a desiccated Christmas wreath, and that's when everything got awesome. Graceland's formal rooms are all white carpet and gold trimmings and mirrors. With its hide-covered furniture and lamps hanging from chains and vines draping a stone wall, the Jungle Room did not disappoint, but downstairs was the real action: a room with three televisions embedded in the walls, a sectional sofa with sequin-bedecked pillows, a mirror-topped coffee table bearing a bizarre porcelain creature of indeterminate origin gazing toward the door, and a billiards room with walls and ceiling entirely upholstered in pleated floral fabric that might have been fashioned by a seamstress on mushrooms. Somehow it felt like more than checking off an item on a bucket list. Maybe it had something to do with a dawning sense that I was moving past the delayed gratifications of motherhood, past the time of putting off what I wanted to do. Or maybe it had something to do with coming full circle, of making a vow just as our marriage was beginning and finally seeing it through just as we were on the verge of being alone again. Mirror after mirror, there I was, right in the heart of Graceland: smiling and smiling and smiling. Unquote
    • Margaret Renkl, for the NYT, in an article published on January 6, 2018 and entitled, "Graceland at last" where the editor of Chapter 16, a publication of Humanities Tennessee. tells the story of the many times she missed going to Graceland even when she was in Memphis visiting her sons.
  • In the mid-60s, when Elvis was making those godawful movies and my friends and I were buying albums by the Stones and the Yardbirds, a mate and I would always go to see Elvis on the big screen; we knew the formula and always used to laugh about them afterwards, but what I also remember is what used to happen in the cinema: not long after the opening credits the audience would start talking and laughing through the dialogue – but the second Elvis sang everyone would stop and listen; Elvis' voice had that effect, even when he was considered as a joke by a generation grown up on tougher music and rock musicians who seemed much more rebellious, dangerous and innovative; so, for me, it has always been about the music and even when he was all but lost to us, in those final years, you can still hear that raw passion flare up; and I defy anyone, knowing that he had just separated from his wife and was heartbroken, to listen to "Always on my Mind" and "Fool", and not be moved; you can hear a man whose heart is breaking; listening to the best of his music, whether it be raw rock'n'roll or those genuinely heart aching ballads, confirms for me that Elvis has never left the building.
    • New Zealand Herald's columnist and writer Graham Reid, on his recent visit to Graceland, as published at KIWIBOOMERS.COM
  • Take a track like "One Sided Love Affair"(1956), and really examine every nuance of his voice, every caress, every tease and every growl that he lets loose for the song's duration, and you`ll you come to understand that the reason Presley's voice has been so often imitated is because it was unique and, furthermore, fuckin' great; no phony piano intro, not even a puerile lyric could have ever stopped him from turning this song into a real classic; imagine, then, how great it is when Elvis gets to sing material that is up to his standards — like on the Sun Records label song "Tryin' To Get You" (1955) - , probably the bluesiest song on this record, where Presley shows a sense of determination, not just a combination of nobleness and sex, but an expression of guts as well; quite simply, this is a guy who knows what he wants, and knows he's gonna get it, and his confidence – never arrogance –, is so contagious that by the end of the song, you believe it too.
    • Daniel Reifferscheid, reviewing Elvis' first album, for Toxic Universe
  • Many of them had camped out overnight, and on the morning of June 7 they filed through the estate's famous iron gates. That day, 3,000 Elvis Presley fans paid $5 to be the first to visit Graceland, the mansion where he had lived and found dead in 1977 at the age of 42. Moving through the gaudy Southern mansion, as Reuters described it, fans saw the trophy building, with its gold records and costumes, the living room's stained-glass peacocks, and the meditation gardens, where Elvis was buried. Paul Simon made a pilgrimage to Graceland in song, and Bruce Springsteen actually leaped over the wall in 1976. But in 1957, it was just a nice, colonnaded mansion in the Memphis suburbs that Elvis, then 22, bought for his parents for $102,500. Today 600,000 people a year visit Graceland, and it lives on in dreams.
  • One day, when I was very very young, We ended up playing poker. During the game he casually asked one of his entourage about the new Chrysler car that was released that day and then handed him a wad of cash and said, ‘ Go get one.’ ‘ Any special colour?’ ‘ Nah, I don’t care’ he said ii) Had he done "A star is born" he would have been incredible, like Streisand wanted him to"
    • Burt Reynolds, as reported in the Daily Express 21 Nov 2015 edition ii) reminiscing with Ann Margret and Reba McIntire in her television program "Conversations", on their respective careers.
  • I got to meet Elvis, an adorable, sweet Southern boy as charming as he could be. No wonder all the girls fell all over him.He was as wonderful in person as he was on the screen. He didn't want to make some of those films at all, but you know, you have to do what you have to do and now Elvis is gone, we're lucky we have what he did do.
    • Debbie Reynolds, in the 2008 TV documentary "Hollywood: Singing and Dancing".
  • Elvis Presley was a legend, even in my homeland of Korea. When I received a phone call from a man who identified himself as Elvis Presley and told me that he was interested in continuing his studies in the martial arts under my direction, it occurred to me that this was most probably someone's idea of a joke; however, several hours later, I found myself seated behind my desk with him, seated across from me. Elvis then told me that it was at Master Ed Parker's suggestion that he contacted me. I was more than flattered, I was overwhelmed. He then insisted on training in regular classes with other students. He quickly realized that students were watching him rather than paying attention in the class so he asked me to arrange a demonstration which would allow the students to view his technique and see that he was attending class as a martial artist, not as an entertainer. I selected a day when a promotion (rank advancement) test was already scheduled and combined the two events. I selected this day because Elvis particularly enjoyed working with children and the student to be tested was a boy. Elvis was very humble. As a student of the martial arts, he was physically strong, his technique was excellent, one of the best. He was a master entertainer and a master showman, but he was also a Master human being. In many ways, Elvis taught me more than I taught him.
    • Sensey Master Kang Rhee describing his relationship with Elvis in www.kanghreecom.
  • When I was a child of 5 or 6, I loved my little record player, but, other than children's storytelling albums, I owned only two albums — both gospel: Johnny Cash's “The Holy Land" and Elvis Presley's Gospel.
    • Ronda Rich, best-selling Southern author and syndicated columnist in an interview with the Gainesville Times, as published on their December 10 2018 online edition.
  • On board I sing a song that Andrew Lloyd Webber and I wrote for Elvis, “It’s Easy for You.” We have a little Elvis interlude. When I was a spotty 15-year-old, Elvis was my hero, and I never dreamt that many years later, he would sing a song that we wrote. When he was in Vegas, we met his music publisher, Freddy Bienstock, and he said, "Oh, Elvis’s always looking for good songs.” This was after Elvis had broken up with Priscilla Presley, and we wrote “It’s Easy for You,” about leaving a wife and child for another woman. In 1977 it came out: It was the last track on the last album he recorded before he died. It's the one song many people haven't heard, but one I think they enjoy very much in the shows.
    • Tim Rice, in an article entitled "When a Two-Time Oscar-Winning Composer Puts on a Show on Luxury Cruises as published on their 21 February 2019 edition.
  • As far as rock, he was the boss...
  • I want to thank Jim Carrey, one of my biggest fans, then Will Smith, my Mama, Elvis Presley, J. Cruz, Cece, Power 106, my girl, my kids and Eddie Murphy."
    • Rapper Rich The Kid, thanking those sho influenced him, in an article for HotNewHipHop's March 20, 2019 edition
  • I owe Elvis Presley my career and the entire music business owes him its lifeline...
  • Good records just get better with age. But the one that really turned me on, like an explosion one night, listening to Radio Luxembourg on my little radio when I was supposed to be in bed and asleep, was “Heartbreak Hotel”. That was the stunner. I'd never heard it before, or anything like it. I'd never heard of Elvis before. It was almost as if I'd been waiting for it to happen. I'm supposed to be asleep; I'm supposed to be going to school in the morning Then, “Since my baby left me” – it was just the sound. It was the last trigger. That was the first rock and roll I heard. It was a totally different way of delivering a song, a totally different sound, stripped down, burnt, no bullshit, no violins and ladies' choruses and schmaltz, totally different. It was bare, right to the roots that you had a feeling were there but hadn't yet heard. I've got to take my hat off to Elvis for that. The silence is your canvas, that's your frame, that's what you work on; don't try and deafen it out. That's what “Heartbreak Hotel” did to me. It was the first time I'd heard something so stark. Then I had to go back to what this cat had done before. Luckily I caught his name. The Radio Luxembourg signal came back in. “That was Elvis Presley, with ‘Heartbreak Hotel.'” sh*t!
  • As I tell my kids now, ‘No, I didn’t know Abraham Lincoln.’ But Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis Jr, I had a chance to meet, and know. But I missed Elvis and I regret that. I was too young when he died.
    • Lionel Richie, in an interview with the Las Vegas Journal, published on February 7, 2018.
  • Elvis was huge in the fifties, had his troubles in the sixties, but he came roaring back in the seventies, when he was huge all over again. He took over Vegas and made the town his own. When he was playing the Hilton, everyone was happy because business trickled down from this show to everywhere else. I'd only met him in passing, but people kept saying he was a big fan of mine. I was flattered but never really believed it. Then one night, when I'm on stage at the Sahara, there he is, with his girlfriend, Linda Thompson, and they are heading for the stage. The audience goes nuts, and all I can say is "Elvis it's great to see you. Looks like you got enough gold around your neck to sink the Titanic. "He laughs and his eyes tell me he's feeling no pain. "Mr. Rickles" he says, "I have a poem I'd like to read in your honor". And I said "Thank you, Elvis. I really appreciate it. Please do". The poem is flowery and no one knows what it's about, so when he's through I say: "Elvis, we love you. You're a genius and a gentleman for gracing my stage. Now, do me a favor, take your chain, belt and cape and go home."
    • Comedian Don Rickles in his autobiography "Rickles' Book" published in 2007.
  • My orchestra shall always aim to create a vibrant atmosphere bringing Sostakovich, Ravel, Elvis and Sinatra together.
    • André Rieu, Dutch violinist and conductor best known for creating the waltz-playing Johann Strauss Orchestra, as noted in an interview with Cafebabel, published on June 7, 2016.
  • Although many people have a hard time defining charisma, they believe they know it when they see it. Most will agree that certain historical leaders, say like Presidents Kennedy, FDR, Ronald Reagan and leaders of social movements, Martin Luther King, Jr., Gandhi, as well and celebrities like Elvis Presley all had charisma. But when it comes to the specific political leader that people support, charisma may be in the eye of the beholder. Charismatic leadership, as theorized by sociologist, Max Weber, was primarily in the relationship between leader and followers. According to Weber, certain followers are drawn to a particular leader and imbue that individual with charisma. An emotional bond forms between leaders and followers, and as long as the followers are happy with their chosen, charismatic leader, all is well. One thing is certain, however. In order to be considered charismatic an individual has to have the ability to connect with and “captivate” followers. So what is the common element that underlies charisma potential? It seems to be the ability to communicate emotionally to others – to be able to inspire them with emotions communicated nonverbally.
    • Ronald E Riggio Ph.D, for Psychology Today in an article entitled "Is charisma in the eye of the beholder?", and as published on their December 25, 2018 online edition.
  • A Graceland expansion would mean economic growth. Representatives with Elvis Presley Enterprises told the council that this decision would be a big deal for the city, with local impact over the next 30 years expected to be $9.3 billion dollars.
    • Siobhan Riley for the Fox Broadcasting Company in an article dated December 18, 2018 and entitled Elvis Presley Enterprises proposes plan to expand Graceland
  • On my radio show, I recall hearing Elvis Presley's “Heartbreak Hotel” playing on my Aunt Babe's radio. It was my most impactful musical memory. That happened when I was six and it just slayed me. Nothing would ever be the same.
    • Steve Ripley, founder of The Tractors, as quoted in his obituary published on Taste of Country-s January 6, 2018 edition, which also mentions he named his only son Elvis.
  • For me, he was always "Saint Elvis", so when I had the chance to sing in Las Vegas at a luxury hotel and as back up to the Smothers' Brothers act, I immediately rushed to the Hilton, where he was appearing. Just his entrance was out of this world, indescribable and peerless, and, as singer he always pushed the envelop, an amazing performer all the way to the end".
    • Spanish rocker Miguel Rios, in his biography "Cosas que siempre quise contar" (2013)
  • I never quite “got” Elvis until after his death, but now I fully understand people's fascination with him. That man could really sing. He reinvented himself more times than David Bowie and I remember dancing to this song with the most beautiful woman in the world.
    • BBC radio presenter Nick Risby, speaking about Elvis' singing in Can't Help Falling in Love, in his opinion one of the top 20 songs of all time.
  • i) It was the highest rated documentary ever, catchin a 43 % share, until Monica Lewinsky interview by Barbara Walters. ii) If I wanted to have someone come to my house to entyerian myt family for the Thankgicving holidays, I would choose Elvis.
    • Geraldo Rivera, i) speaking about his 20-20 show on Elvis0 last days and ii) during a segment of The Five, broadcast on Thanksgving Day, 2021, on the Fox netwrk.
  • I went yo see "Loving You" and when I decided to pursue a career in rock, I changed my last name to that the character played by Elvis.
    • Dick Rivers (born Hervé Forneri, French singer and actor, as noted by IMDB
  • My goodness, we all loved him, I met him many times, our children went to school together, he was terrific, a true gentleman
    • Joan Rivers rapping up her 1992 commemorative show highlighting Elvis' movie career
  • This friend of mine and I got tickets for a couple of bucks apiece. In fact, was just a kid when a country music show came to Baton Rouge, LA. In the middle of the show, they announced a special guest sensation from Memphis. So this guy comes out in a pink suit – he didn't even have a drummer – and starts jumping around while they're setting up the amp and a big acoustic bass. Then he started in with, “Well that’s all right, mama,” and we all went, “Hey, that’s the song we like on the radio,” because the station was playing it in Baton Rouge. There was Elvis. He did That's All Right and Blue Moon Of Kentucky, the B-side of his first record. We went to the back of the school afterwards, where he had this little Cadillac pulling a trailer, and they were loading the bass and stuff into it. He was talking to some of the country music guys about cars. He was probably 18 or 19, and I was 12 or 13. I'm just looking at him, thinking this guy is really cool and different. Little did we know...
    • Johnny Rivers on seeing Elvis Presley for the first time, in his hometown of Shreveport LA, speaking to Jim Clash, of Forbes on May 14, 2015
  • Anywhere in the world, not before, during or after has there been a bigger music star than Elvis Presley. I always wanted to record one of his ballads, but in English, and I chose the title track for his second movie, "Loving you" ...
    • Roberto Carlos, Brazilian biggest music superstar, in an interview published on 26 December, 2014
  • Sixty-two years ago Sunday, Elvis Presley took the stage at CBS studios in New York and smiled as a city health official stuck a needle in his left arm. The publicity stunt, broadcast nationwide before Presley's 2nd appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show,” was meant to convince the American public that the new polio vaccine was safe. It worked. And playing to Presley's demographic apparently helped. About 75 percent of Americans under 20 had received at least one polio shot by August 1957, when the first national survey was taken; this rose to nearly 90 percent by September 1961, according to a 1962 public health report.
    • Karin Roberts, writing for NBC News on the 62nd anniversary of Elvis' polio advocacy, as noted in an article entitled "When it comes to vaccines, celebrities often call the shots", and published on October 28, 2018.
  • It's the birthday of the King, as Elvis Presley would have said."
    • Farmer David Robinson Roberto, on milking his farm's 140 cows on Christmas day, in spite of most people taking Christmas off, to be published on the Otago Dailyu Times on 27 December 2017.
  • Robinson was a harbinger of an important shift in American life, one of the first of a burgeoning black culture, held in check by legal and social stricture that was about to burst forth and dominate the mainstream. He and Elvis Presley both played black, brought black style into the mainstream and were demonized as polluters before they were lionized as cultural heroes. Would Presley have been possible if not for Jackie Robinson? Perhaps, but it is probably more correct to see Robinson and Presley as historical inevitabilities, as the first cracks in the cultural dam.
    • About Jackie Robinson, who waved to the audience and took a bow on January 6, 1957, as requested by Ed Sullivan on Elvis third appearance at his show, and as noted by writer, ex-baseball player, musician, and journalist Phillip Martin for the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette and published on blooddirtandangels on April 15, 2011.
  • Elvis was the best looking, nicest, most down to earth man I have ever met, funny to say that, but it's true, it was like a guy you went to school with, anyone who spend any time with him would tell you. He cared how he looked, but no conceit. The best gig I saw had to be his concert at Empire Stadium. There was nothing like it beforehand. He was the first guy to rent stadiums. I'd emceed shows, but standing in front of 26,000 people was nerve-racking.
    • Red Robinson, Canada's foremost disc jockey, known for his having introduced both Elvis and the Beatles at their Empire Stadium shows in Vancouver, BC, in 1957 and 1964, respectively, as told to David Wylie, in his program One on one, as broadcast on 16 November, 2016.
  • Not only did blacks know Presley, he also knew blacks. “I always wanted to sing like Billy Kenny of the Ink Spots. I like that high, smooth style. I never sang like this in my life until I made that first record—That’s Alright, Mama. I remembered that song because I heard Arthur (Big Boy) Crudup sing it and I thought I would like to try it. Presley was making more money singing rhythm and blues than black performers of the day, with Elvis’s nearest competitor, Fats Domino, expecting to earn $700,000 in 1957. (In fact) Otis Blackwell, writer of two huge Presley hits “Don’t Be Cruel” and “All Shook Up.” confirmed, “I got a good deal. I made money and I am happy.-
    • Louis Robinson, African American reporter, after interviewing Presley for Jet magazine on the racist allegation.
  • Elvis was technically fearless and instinctive in his use of technique. In his early material in particular it is as if his voice is finding and creating the lyrics as he is singing them.
    • Cathryn Robson, Senior lecturer in voice and music performance at the University of Westminster, in an article entitled Elvis voice, like Mario Lanza singing the blues, and published on the Conversation on August 17, 2017.
  • In "T.R.O.U.B.L.E", (1975), his baritone was still as solid as ever, with its humorously cavernous bottom and its nasal vibrato on top. When he is putting out, reaching for the top notes and shaping phrases with the same easy individuality that has always marked his best work, he is still the King.
    • John Rockwell, reviewing one of his two 1975 concerts at the Nassau Coliseum for the "New York Times".
  • It's like if you're playing Elvis Presley and you've only got whatever amount of scenes in the movie, you're not gonna work any less hard on the part because you've got less material. You're gonna be like, 'I'm playing Elvis Presley!
    • Oscar winner Sam Rockwell, on taking brief roles in an interview published by the Indie Wire on 29 June 2018.
  • Well, here we go again. Like Elvis in 1968 we eagerly await for the Tiger Woods Comeback Special. We've been here before, of course. Only last month, the former world's No 1 who is now 898th, called off his return at the PGA Tour's Safeway Open just three days before the start of the event...
    • Nick Rodger, writing in the Herald Scotland (28-12-2016), in direct reference to the current decline experienced by Tiger Woods, the outstanding African American golfer who TIME magazine once, albeit too hurriedly, forecast to have the capacity to become a bigger icon than Elvis.
  • Just about everywhere we played, it happened. Sometimes it would be more people than other times, depending on the size of the crowds, but after that first time, when there was a riot, Elvis did not invite the girls backstage anymore. I think he learned that it was not a good idea.
  • Looking at the last century of US history, no other individual can fairly be said to have changed US culture so much while receiving so little recognition for having done so: the gap between what Elvis actually accomplished and the degree to which we understood those accomplishments is far wider for him than it is for any other figure.
    • Author Gilbert Rodmam in his biography, Elvis after Elvis: the posthumous career of a living legend, published by Routledge, London in 1996, p 172.
  • When things are happening you don't appreciate them as much as later, like when Elvis Presley made his comeback special, I was in the recording studio and this was an historical milestone. Photography takes you there.
    • George Rodriguez, noted Mexican American photographer as interviewed by Sara Rosen in an article published by Vice on 10 April, 2018 and entitled "Powerful Vintage Photos Contrast Hollywood Glitz with Civil Disobedience"
  • I must confess that when Fidel spoke despectively about “elvispreslians”, I felt a conflict within me because since I was a kid, I loved both Elvis and his songs. I felt that more than the music itself, Fidel wanted to criticize the old youth in Cuba, those that did not think like he did. It was a truly awkward moment for me, but I was able to get over it, perhaps because my political hierarchies were always more mature than my musical ones...
    • Silvio Rodríguez, Cuban musician, widely considered his country's folk singer and arguably one of Latin America's greatest singer-songwriters, explaining why he chose, at age 15, to continue being a follower of Fidel Castro in spite of the latter's opinion of Elvis followers, like he was, and of rock music in general, as published in Cuba Debate on August 14, 2017.
  • I'm not a singer, and I'm not from the United States. But I randomly listened to country music growing up in England. My dad would play old songs and I was obsessed with Elvis Presley to a point where my family, if it was Christmas or something like that, they'd always get me an Elvis LP. My auntie—who's a Scottish jazz singer— was massively supportive of me liking Elvis. So when this movie came up, I was like, ‘This is the closest I’ll ever get to playing Elvis Presley.’
    • Alex Roe, British actor, telling Coveteur magazine what led him to accept playing a US country singer in the 2018 movie "Forever my girl", in an article published on 19 January, 2018-
  • The next frontier for immersive storytelling may be your headphones, thanks to a new spatial audio platform that Vrai Pictures is set to unveil at SXSW next month. Traverse, as the platform is called, allows users to map their surroundings with the help of mobile augmented reality (AR) technology, and then explore immersive audio experiences in their own living rooms. One of the first experiences to be powered by the new platform is called “From Elvis in Memphis.” It allows users to experience his music by walking through a physical space, with Traverse's app making it spatially sound like they're in the studio with Elvis himself. In the middle of a performance, you can walk right up to him. You can also walk up to any of the other band members. The music suddenly shows a dimensionality that was always there but couldn't be experienced. It just needed the creative insight, the right platform, the tools, and the technology to be realized.
    • Janko Roettgers, in an interview with Vrai Pictures founder Jessica Brillhart, as published by Variety, in an article entitled "Spatial Audio Application Traverse to Launch at SXSW With Immersive Elvis Experience", as published on their February 28, 2019 edition
  • In 1991, Graceland gained a spot on the National Register of Historic Places, keeping Elvis Presley ahead of his time even in death. The National Park Service now honors the place Elvis called home from 1957 to 1977 when he died. It's very, very rare that a site is placed on the register when its the home of a famous person whose achievements are less than 50 years old, said George Berklacey, chief spokesman for the National Park Service. But the keeper of the national register, Jerry Rogers, felt Graceland and Presley were “an exceptional significance,” Berklacey said.
    • Laud on the importance of Elvis Presley and Graceland by Jerry Rogers, keeper of the US National Register of Historic Places as published by the Commercial Appeal on November 7, 1991.
  • So I went to his show and he introduced me as his friend. I went for about eight nights in a row just to hear him introduce me that way. And I found a little way to get backstage before the normal people got backstage and I went back there and he always treated me with such respect. I loved that about him. I remember one night backstage when he said, ‘Where are you going?’ I said, ‘I’m going to go play a little blackjack. Why don’t you come with me?’ And he said, ‘You know, I would give anything in the world to go out there with you’. But he thought he would get hurt, and the more I think about it, he couldn't have sat at the table like I did. I judge people by how well they treat me. That's what I loved about him. He made me feel so comfortable and I didn't really know him...
    • Kenny Rogers, in an teleconferenced interview with Jimmie Tramel for the Tulsa World, and as published on Friday, March 17, 2017
  • Elvis Presley press-agented as a singer and entertainer, played to two groups of teenagers numbering several thousand at the city auditorium here, Monday, May 14. As newspaper man, parent, and former member of Army Intelligence Service, I feel an obligation to pass on to you my conviction that Presley is a definite danger to the security of the United States.
    • First paragraph of the Roman Catholic Diocese of La Crosse-influenced letter, signed by the Editor in Chief of La Crosse Register's and addressed to the then FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover on May 16, 1956.
  • Calistoga up the road was significantly affected by the fire along with other regions like Atlas Peak and Mt. Vreeder, but on the latter there were properties like the reservation-only "Outpost Wines" — known especially for its juicy Zinfandels — that survived. Thankfully the fire didn't affect the recent opening of "The Ink House" on the way to Rutherford, an 1800s house where Elvis Presley once slept and was reimagined as a hyper-luxurious B&B with butler-style service, not to mention plentiful Castellucci wine by the same family and a Bentley house car for dropoffs and pickups.
    • Kathryn Romeyn, in an article which focused on California wine country travel and everything one would need to know to plan a trip to the regions after the horrific 2017 fires, including the 18th century hotel Elvis stayed while filming "Wild in the Country",as published on the Jet Set magazine on February 22, 2018
  • At some point on the night of October 22, 2018 the home fans at Old Trafford Stadium will probably sing a round of "Viva Ronaldo". From distant metro platforms to wind-raked terraces, it has been a Manchester United standard of the past decade, an Elvis-riff on those six years when he transformed himself from dazzling gadfly to the best footballer in the world. Until then, this still feels like a homecoming curiosity, a reminder of just how exhilarating that "Ronaldo-as-Elvis footballer" was; and a reminder too, whatever his ultimate destiny, of happier past associations for a player who was for at least three of those years, the best the league has ever seen.
  • About Cristiano Ronaldo's first trip to Manchester to play his old team since he joined Juventus AC, as written by Barney Ronay in an article entitled "Ronaldo’s return to Old Trafford a reminder of how life used to be", published in the Guardian's October 21, 2018 edition
  • i) Q magazine bravely attempted to name the best and worst singers ever. They did a good job, wisely going big with Elvis as the to choice. ii) There was no model for Elvis Presley's success; what Sun Records head Sam Phillips sensed was something in the wind, an inevitable outgrowth of all the country and blues he was recording at his Union Avenue studio; enter Presley in 1954, bringing with him a musical vocabulary rich in country, country blues, gospel, inspirational music, bluegrass, traditional country, and popular music -- as well as a host of emotional needs that found their most eloquent expression in song; his timing was impeccable, not only as a vocalist, but with regard to the cultural zeitgeist: emerging in the first blush of America's postwar ebullience, Presley captured the spirit of a country flexing its industrial muscle, of a generation unburdened by the concerns of war, younger, more mobile, more affluent, and better educated than any that had come before; (as such), the Sun recordings were the first salvos in an undeclared war on segregated radio stations nationwide. iii) At Sun Studio in Memphis Elvis Presley called to life what would soon be known as rock and roll with a voice that bore strains of the Grand Ole Opry and Beale Street, of country and the blues. At that moment, he ensured – instinctively, unknowingly – that pop music would never again be as simple as black and white.”
    • Rolling Stone magazine, focusing on the importance of Elvis' Sun Records label recordings [specific citation needed], ii) published on 5 March, 2007 and iii) as published in 1986.
  • Though Elvis seems nearly as much a function of time and place as of talent and personality, his rise was clearly no accident. Peter Guralnick presents Elvis as the vessel, Sam and Dewey Phillips as the catalysts, and rock 'n' roll as a historical inevitability. Now, "Why him?" is what other Memphis boys kept asking in the summer of 1954, when Sun issued his first single, "That's All Right Mama" backed with "Blue Moon of Kentucky". There were a hundred other kids in Memphis with talent and ambition, any one of them as accomplished as Elvis so, again, why him?. To Marion Keisker, Sam's assistant, "He was like a mirror in a way: whatever you were looking for, you were going to find in him. In short, he had all the intricacy of the very simple." This ability to mirror the dreams and yearnings of others is the hallmark of every great star, from Judy Garland to Marilyn Monroe to James Dean. Within two years, Elvis would be one of them.
    • Frank Rose, reviewing Peter Guralnick's "Last Train to Memphis" for Los Angeles Times Book Review̺'s October 2, 1994 edition in an essay entitled "Why Elvis".
  • In December of 1968, while punching a heavy bag in a gym in L.A. I hear a voice sing out, 'Hey, Lionel! What's doin'?' And it was Elvis Presley himself. I was in awe of him, but he said he was in awe of me (LOL).
    • Lionel Rose, the first indigenous bantamweight world boxing champion from Australia,recalling, for EIN, the time when he met Elvis just before his LA title defense fight with Chucho Castillo.
  • I was really impressed and surprised to learn a lot of things about him,
    • Shep Rose, lead actor in Southern Charm, recommending HBO's Elvis: The Searcher as one of the top documentaries of 2018.
  • It had been a sensational interview and I knew I had everything I needed for an excellent story for Rolling Stone. I truly felt a real connection with Paul Rogers and his new band Band Company which gave me the courage to do what I did next: invite the singer to see Elvis Presley, who was performing on the night of May 11, 1974 at the Inglewood Forum. And I knew Rodgers was a huge fan, even trying to sneak into Graceland one time back when he was with his previous band Free. As we made the 45-minute drive to the Inglewood Forum —a huge 20,000-seat arena where the Los Angeles Lakers played— Paul couldn't stop talking about finally seeing Elvis. We parked and I handed Paul his ticket. He looked at it like it was the Holy Grail itself. We walked inside, found our seats and from the moment Presley took the stage, Rodgers could barely contain himself, screaming, shouting and jumping up and down like a kid, acting the way I did when I first saw his previous band, Free, so many years earlier when they opened for Blind Faith. Watching Paul while he watched a then-34-year old Elvis do his thing felt like an out-of-body experience. It was like some perfect circle. When the lights came up and as everybody was exiting the arena, Paul saw various members of Led Zeppelin along with Peter Grant, who by then managed both Bad Company and Led Zeppelin, going backstage. I knew I wouldn't be able to go there myself, but I didn't really care, all I wanted was for Paul to get to meet his hero. However, we were stopped by a pair of burly bodyguards guarding the backstage entrance. I tried to explain to them that this was Paul Rodgers, but they weren't bulging. Eventually, we had a message relayed backstage and when Peter finally came back out, he told Paul he couldn't get him in. If Paul was hurt by being treated so selfishly —it felt as if Led Zeppelin wanted an audience with the King all by themselves— he didn't show it. Paul was still jubilant so when we returned to the hotel, that's when Paul told me, “I’ll just tell my friends I talked to him anyway." He had purchased a souvenir booklet and would use that as evidence though Paul and I would always know the truth.
    • Excerpted from Steve Rosen's article entitled "Behind the curtain: Taking Paul Rogers, (then frontman for the UK supergroup Bad Company and formerly of the band Free) to an Elvis Presley concert in Los Angeles, as published in Rockcellar Magazine's March, 6 2015's edition.
  • Few have probably heard of him unless you're a serious fan of Jewish cantorial music. But if you have, you know he's the equivalent of Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, Luciano Pavarotti -- a singer to be remembered forever.
    • About Yossele Rosenblatt, as written by Ina Jaffe for NPR in an article entitled "The Cantor With The Heavenly Voice" and published on their September 6, 2010 online version.
  • His 2019 election victory took him from popular buffoon to prime minister just like Elvis’ comeback TV special in 1968, which crowned him the undisputed king of rock ‘n’ roll. However, after a year, the name ‘Boris’ suddenly no longer sounded like a buddy, but now carried the same contemptuous undertone as ‘Maggie’ , the last person in office who was customarily referred to by her first name. Once the brand has become a dirty word, there is no turning back. The fact is Johnson is now in the ‘Fat Elvis’ stage of his career
    • Robert Rotifer's take on UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson,as noted by the Express on its February 15, 2022 edition in an article entitled "Boris branded 'fat Elvis' in brutal German media take down"
  • I was contacted, not all that long ago, by the son of a military officer who was at the time the military attache to Prime Minister Harold Holt. He told this story just before he died to his son who told me that his dad was in Harold Holt's office and Harold was struggling with popularity and the anti-war movement. The officer said to Harold Holt “what you need is an Elvis Presley. Get Normie Rowe called up”. If the Prime Minister says something is going to happen then there is a pretty good chance it is going to happen".
    • Normie Rowe, Australian singer, telling Noise11.com in 2015, about his being drafted as a political ruse to help the popularity of Harold Holt, the Australian Prime Minister whose death by drowning in December of 1967 was never confirmed.
  • After Maria Callas, Elvis Presley is the #2 of the Holy Trinity for taking blues, gospel and spirituals, and sexing them together while also desexualizing the more rough-edged and raunchy root ingredients (ie: removing the black stigma) to make it into rock n' roll and music for the masses. Elvis had an undeniably great voice and incredible moves...
    • Drew Rowsome, writer, musician, editor and pop culture critic, in an article entitled Elvis Presley: the second of the Holy Trinity
  • Even as a kid, I knew music was central to my personality. Like many of us, I recognized that it could also be my source of income after I saw Elvis Presley on The Tommy Dorsey Show. When he made it so big, all us Southern boys thought maybe we had a shot, too.
  • In Bedford there’s probably more chance of seeing Elvis than seeing your local GP.”
    • Charles Royden, Deputy Mayor of Bedford, speaking about the shortage of general practitioners in his locality, a market town in England and as published on Bradford Today's May 19, 2022 edition
  • As he stepped back into the ring, singing as if his life depends on it, you can feel the visceral thrill as this underdog eagerly reclaims his title. It paid off in spades, rejuvenating his career and proving that, as pop culture spun on its axis, even its most stalwart participants could change gears and reinvent themselves. It wasn't quite Ali vs. Foreman, but as 1968's highest-rated television special, it was close.
    • Writer Joel Rubinoff, on the 50th Anniversary of NBC's Elvis special, which was broadcast on 3 December 1968, and as published on the Record, on January 7, 2018.
  • He was a really, really, really good looking guy who could really sing, Elvis is the definition of IT. He is one of the people that I owe for choosing a life in music.
    • Darius Rucker, American R&B singer and songwriter who first gained fame as the lead vocalist and rhythm guitarist of rock band Hootie & the Blowfish, in an interview with Gracelandcom.
  • We three became four again when my sister Loree, who had entered a convent just a couple of years before me decided to return to the outside world. It was later transpired that it was the nuns who had decided Loree should return to the world. In fact, as a novice she had refused to surrender her Elvis Presley vinyls to Mother Superior. Later, (Our own) Mother became convinced that the Good Lord might have had a different vocation in mind for Loree.
    • Kevin Rudd, former Prime Minister of Australia from 2007 to 2010 and again in 2013 speaking about his sister Loree' devotion for Elvis in an article he authored, published on October 20, 2017 in the Brisbane Courier, and entitled "Corporal punishment and humiliation were rife during Kevin Rudd’s time at a Catholic college"
  • Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman's "Viva Las Vegas"(1963), was custom-written as the title song for Elvis Presley's 14th film, a rollicking tribute to the city of gambling given a spirited performance by Presley and his session musicians; strangely, it remained an underrated Presley song for a long time, finally beginning to gain some recognition from an unexpected quarter when the "Dead Kennedys" recorded it in 1980, their radical recontextualization of it helping the song to an independent life beyond its origins; on its own, it can now be appreciated as a tribute to Las Vegas that probably deserves to be the city's official anthem.
    • William Ruhlmann, reviewing "Viva Las Vegas" for AllMusicGuide.com, before the Office of the Mayor of Las Vegas requested Elvis Presley Enterprises to allow it to become the city's official song; the price demanded by EPE was too high, so Las Vegas remains, to this date, without an official song.
  • After his show, Sammy Davis Jr said he would arrange for my wife Joyce and I to see the best entertainer in Las Vegas which, considering Sammy´s fame, was quite a compliment (Once at the show), the audience was enthralled as the singer sang songs of every genre. And that evening I became a fan of Elvis Presley. Even today, particularly on Sundays when we do not get to church, Joyce and I listen to Elvis singing gospel songs.
    • Donald Rumsfeld, former Secretary of Defense, as cited in his memoirs "Known and Unknown", published by the Penguin Group (pp 128-29)
  • They decamped to Munich in June 1979, and he had just checked in at the glittering Bayerischer Hof Hotel and stepped into the bath to wash away the travel grime, when a melody came to him. It was a hiccup-y rockabilly number, somewhat tongue-in-cheek. It had affectionate elements of the recently departed Elvis Presley, who had been a major vocal influence on him. Calling for assistant Peter Hince to fetch him an acoustic guitar, he wrapped a towel around his body and began to bash out the skeleton of what might be the most uncharacteristically simple song he ever wrote, which took him five or 10 minutes, doing it on the guitar as he did, and in one way it was quite a good thing because he was restricted, knowing so few chords.
    • Jordan Runtag, for RollingStone magazine, on how Freddy Mercury came about to writing Queen's #1 hit 'Crazy Little Thing Called Love'
  • Entertainment-wise Elvis Presley played a big part for me because I'm out kicking my foot across the stage, but Elvis Presley did the same thing I do. He can get away with it. (It) kind of opened the door for me, along with B.B. King and all the guys who have come before me (Chuck Berry, Little Richard) who set a trail for me to come through the door. Now I'm one of the top five who are left to do this and I thank God for putting me in this position. I never thought that I would be an icon as the leading role of the blues cats, man, especially the black blues cats. I never thought I'd be here.
    • Bluesman Bobby Rush, in an interview published by the Huff Post on 6 February 2015.
  • In the '50s, listening to Elvis on the radio in Bombay – it didn't feel alien. Noises made by a truck driver from Tupelo, Mississippi, seemed relevant to a middle-class kid growing up on the other side of the world. That has always fascinated me. I suppose what's interesting about rock and roll is it was the first cultural phenomenon that was about, for, controlled by and made by young people. And your mother didn't like it. Certainly my mother didn't, though she got used to it, eventually. In fact, I think Elvis was the one who got to her.
    • Sir Salman Rushdie, UK/Indian novelist and essayist as published in branyquotes.com
  • For me it goes back to Elvis. The reality is, my experience with Elvis and ‘Heartbreak Hotel’ as a wonderful revelation is exactly the same experience that Paul McCartney had, that Keith Richards had, that Mick Jagger had, that they all had because they're all just sitting in England wondering what they're going to do. And Elvis comes over the airwaves and changes everybody's life.”
    • World renowned rock photographer Ethan Russell, describing his early years as an eleven year old kid in San Francisco, and as published on September 23, 2015 in the online edition of "The Townsman".
  • It's funny – because we didn't talk a great deal about him. That was one thing we never got around to. When I played Elvis, in 1979, then in 2001, a lot of people said to me “Boy, you must be a great Elvis fan”. When you play a real person you have parameters. When you play a famous person that everyone knows, now the parameters become very finite. It's your job to go right up against the edges of those parameters. I said I worked with him, as a child, in 1962, but I did not know that much about his career or anything. I remember him distinctly, because I worked with him for two weeks on the movie and most of it was with him. I saw him off-camera a lot. But in 1979, I learned about him. And when I learned about him, I became a pretty decent Elvis fan. But nothing like Quentin, he probably knows everything about him. He knows about his music, he's probably seen all his movies. Yeah, so someday I'll say hey, tell me some of your feelings about Elvis.
    • Kurt Russell, from an interview with Sebastian Haselbeck, a writer for the Quentin Tarantino Archives' who asked him whether he and Tarantino had discussed Elvis during the shoot of "The Hateful Eight", as published in the QTA' online page in March of 2015.
  • I'm a big Elvis fan, so I went to see him when he was playing in Las Vegas and, after the show, I was invited up to his room to meet him. I was very excited so I blurted out: "Why did you make all those stupid movies?" I couldn't believe I've said that and felt so embarrassed but Elvis just said, "Last thing I remember I was driving a truck" So now every time I say something stupid, I think of Elvis."
    • Rocker Leon Russell, talking about the time he met his idol, after starting off his concert in Denver, on April 26, 2015, with Presley's cover version of Ray Charles' "I got a woman"
  • I had met him on a few occasions, but we hadn't spent any time together. One night in 1971 after a show at the International, I went backstage, where he was with a group of his buddies discussing where they were going to eat. He spotted me and called me over. 'Hey, man, you ever have a peanut butter and banana sandwich, on white bread?' "I thought he was putting me on, so I played along. 'Love 'em,' I said." 'Great, man! You're coming with us!'"'Where we going?' I asked. "'San Francisco, brother" So we flew out of McCarran Airport on Elvis's private jet, landing there about an hour later. There were eight of us, and he did the ordering. An initial round of sixteen sandwiches was sucked up in minutes, washed down by gallons of lemonade. I had one. After the meal, we got back on the plane and flew back to Vegas. Once we were in his suite, he decided he wanted to watch a Western movie. A projector was set up and a 1930s oater with Hoot Gibson began. As i saw it, Elvis and his crew were whooping it up like real cowboys, and I wondered what the hell I was doing there. Then the guns came out. Elvis packed a 1942 Beretta 9 mm pistol given to him by General Omar Bradley, with the others having revolvers. He fired the first shot into a wall, and everyone followed suit as if mimmickimg the action in the movie, where Gibson was chasing a bunch of bad guys and trading shots with them. I thought a couple of live rounds would've been it, but then Elvis started overturning furniture, and the guys divided up into two sides. I ducked behind a couch as everyone hid behind cover and traded shots. They aimed high, but bullets can travel through walls, and who knows where they could've wound up. Within a minute, the "Gunfight in Suite 3000" was over and every­one repaired to the bar to get loaded, pun intended. I stayed a while, but I couldn't hear a damn thing because I was temporarily deaf from the gunfire. But I love Elvis. He was unique for what he was, he was statuesque"
    • Actor Gianni Russo, in pages 117-118 of his autobiography entitled "Hollywood Godfather: My Life in the Movies and the Mob", published by St. Martin's Press. The Baretta being mentioned, a 1942 Model M1934 9 mm Corto Caliber Pistol (Known as .380 ACP in Modern Day) was later gifted by Elvis to his tehn girfriend Barbara Leigh and she auctioned it in 2018, for US$51,000, the buyer being the Graceland Museum where it can be now seen.
  • It seems like since the early days of rock and roll, there's been a uniform that's consisted of jeans, T-shirt and black leather jacket," she says. Elvis Presley, though, served his version with a twist: He was very much influenced by African American style on Beale Street in Memphis and incorporated everything from shiny suits to the poet-sleeved shirts his mother made for him into his wardrobe. But Presley wasn't exactly one for playing by the rules
    • Meredith Rutledge-Borger, associate curator at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, tracing the origin of 2017's rock outfits in an article published on October 17 2017, on FASHIONISTA.
  • To have two cycling riders of the calibre of Kelly and Roche emerge independently of one another within the space of four years, is akin to the town of Tupelo, Mississippi, producing a second Elvis Presley shortly after the first. It is a most astonishing accident of history.
    • Barry Ryan, a cycling journalist and author of the Ascent, referring to Irish superstars Sean Kelly and Stephen Roche, as reported in the Irish Independent on October 7, 2017.
  • Elvis Presley summed it up perfectly when filming the musical "Roustabout". The director, John Rich, wasn't particularly impressed with his entourage hanging around and playing practical jokes on one another. When Rich approached him about his traveling companions clowning around and disrupting, he didn't back down from his director. He told Rich, "When these damn movies cease to be fun, I'll stop doing them." Cheers, Elvis. Couldn't have said it better myself.
    • Peggy Ryan complaining about the political madness arising out of the 2016 Presidential election in an article entitled ""It Finally Happened: Politics Has Ruined Everything Fun"", published in The American Thinker on October 3, 2016
  • There were maybe thirty people in the room and he walks in and the first thing that happens is our eyes meet. He's probably fifteen feet away from me and then he flings a grape that hits me right between the eyes, in the forehead. I didn't talk to him that night other than when he came over and knelt down while apologizing. So he then joined the rest of the people in the room and so I took my cue and left. Elvis had qualities that no other human being has, had, will have. Some of them are so hard to describe because the charisma, the qualities that he had were almost not of this world, you know. They were, a lot of times, angelic. But it was his innocence that really impressed me. His biggest joy was in the giving...
    • Sheilla Ryan, recalling the day she met Elvis in Las Vegas in 1972, as told in an interview published in EIN's website page, on March 31, 2016.

S[edit]

  • Although the beachside hotels on the bay supplemented most of the older hotels, El Mirador maintained its status, primarily because of the iconic cliff divers, or clavadistas, who dived from a platform outside the hotel more than forty meters into the water below. The classic image of cliff divers in Acapulco was immortalized in popular culture worldwide by the film "Fun in Acapulco" (1963), in which Elvis Presley plays a former acrobat, down on his luck and stranded there.
    • Andrew Sackett in his essay "The Politics of Development on the Mexican Riviera", as included in From Holiday in Mexico by Berger, Dina, Duke University Press Duke University Press, 2009.
  • Every time he'd appeared on Letterman, he'd had to change his act. Written down, worked out, pre-approved by the production staff, his sweet improvisational melody was sliced and diced into a sampled, discordant riff. He just didn't come across. And he hadn't yet figured out what to do about it. At least not until that twelfth appearance. His ghost appearance, resonating forever in the memory of the Ed Sulli­van Theatre, there, center stage, near Elvis's swiveling hips. Another really big show, never to be seen.
    • Mike Sager, recalling the time comedian Bill Hicks's monologue at the David Letterman Show was removed from the broadcast until that point in October 1, 1993, the only occasion where a comedian's entire routine was cut after taping' in US television history —, as noted in an article entitled "The Gospel according to Bill Hicks" published on April 10, 2017 at the Stacks online page. Unbeknownst to Sager, that censure, on Hickñs 12th appearance at Letterman's show, coincided with what took place on precisely Elvis 12th appearance on national television, when he was filmed from the waist up only, the happening taking place, as the writer did notice, at the exact same place, the Ed Sullivan Theatre, then CBS Studio 50.
  • Elvis Presley was more influential as a performer than any other musician in world history. In some respects he resembled other influential performers, including the famous Italian violinist Niccolò Paganini (1782–1840) and the Hungarian pianist Franz Liszt (1811–1886). Like them Elvis was exciting, charismatic, and enormously successful. Unlike Liszt and Paganini,however, Elvis did not compose any of his own music, yet the ways in which he performed the songs he sang transformed twentieth-century popular music worldwide. At his best, was most influential as a Southern White singer who introduced audiences throughout the United States and around the world to Black American music, especially to rock ‘n’ roll, a form of rhythm and blues. He was also influential because he combined in his performances elements from different American singing styles, including gospel, rockabilly, country-western and standard' pop numbers; he even employed bel canto singing in a few songs borrowed from Italian music. His stage persona was extremely influential as well, simultaneously glamorising, as he did, rock music and making it seem ‘dangerous’, thus even inspiring aspects of punk rock in the 1970s. Later, his performances as a touring artist and a Las Vegas entertainer contributed to the birth of glam rock.
    • Michael Saffle introduction in The Musical Characteristics of Elvis Presley, written in 2009 at the request of Government of the Hong Kong's Special Administrative Region.
  • Bill was about 16 when he drove from Blanco, Texas, to see Elvis Presley play at the then Municipal Auditorium. And when he found out the show was sold out, he climbed a tree to try to get into a window. He saw Elvis there in the window so Elvis motioned to him and asked him, 'What are you doing up there in the tree?' And Bill Wittliff explained , and Elvis Presley tore out a paper towel and wrote to the ticket taker to let these three boys in. They're friends of mine. We have that piece of paper on display at the Wittliff Collection.
  • I was publishing a book with the title "The case against Muhammed", dealing with the founder of Islam, from a critical point of view, and many people were asking me "why do you do that? And my answer was always "because you are asking me". Because you wouldn't if the book had been called "The Case against Elvis Presley". You would accept any criticism of any historical figure, you will consider it as freedom of art, of research, of opinion, but in the case of Muhammed, you say "The Prophet is the Muslim's world last stone of identity, so why do you attack HIM, let him in peace". And I then always answer my Muslim friends, that maybe he became the last stone of their identity because they left him in peace, alone, for fourteen hundred years.
    • Egyptian writer Hamed Abdel Samad, in a speech at the Folkemode, on 17 June 2016, in the Danish town of Bornholm.
  • Often overlooked, probably because of his immense popularity and mega-star status, Elvis was an extremely generous and compassionate human. I remember an appearance by Elvis on the Ed Sullivan show on a Sunday night while my grandmother was babysitting me. Sitting in a rocking chair and looking over the top of her glasses while she was knitting she uttered, “That boy is going places”. I was 7 or 8, she was 60 something and that moment is etched indelibly in my mind. Hey Nana, you were right.
    • Edward Samarak, in a letter to the Editor of the Mystic Stamp Company following the publication of an article dated 28 October 2017 and entitled "Elvis’ Polio Vaccine Raises Immunization Levels"
  • Shortly after midnight, arriving at San Antonio International airport on Hugh Hefner ‘Playboy’ DC-9 and wearing a long coat with white fur trim, he was greeted by fans before his manager, Col. Tom Parker, took him away in a black limousine to an unknown hotel destination. Fans, when interviewed, felt that if he looked that good when he traveled, that they could only imagine what he will look like on stage. He didn't disappoint. During the concert, a lady who was bitten in a fight over a scarf he threw into the crowd was later taken to the hospital where she was given a tetanus shot from a physician who thought the whole thing was humorous, particularly as the lady said her attacker could be identified by a bald spot on her head, which she had, in turn inflicted, on her....
  • I suppose you'd had to call him a lyric baritone, although with exceptional high notes and unexpectedly rich low ones. But what is more important about Elvis Presley is not his vocal range, nor how high or low it extends, but where its center of gravity is. By that measure, Elvis was all at once a tenor, a baritone and a bass, the most unusual voice I've ever heard.
    • Greg Sandow, Music professor at the Juillard School, as published in "The Village Voice".
  • And to think I only wanted to imitate Elvis
    • Sandro Argentinean singer and actor heavily influenced, since age 10, by Elvis, vocally, in the way he looked, as well as stage and movie wise. Unlike many of the entertainers Presley inspired in Latin America and because he did not tour during the 1960's, Sandro was one of the few who were able to actually witness Presley performing at his best, in his case, on November 10, 1971, at the Boston Garden. Sandro was also touring the Boston area, at a smaller venue.
  • He was the greatest. In fact, he was the most charismatic individual I have ever seen both off and on the screen, he was the kind of person who could not walk into a room and not stop whatever was happening in that room. Every person, man or woman would turn to look at him, he was that magical, There are no words in the vocabulary, unless it is that he had magic.
    • Singer Tommy Sands in an interview published by youtube by Alan Eichner.
  • At the start, I listened to my older brother's collection of Paul Anka and Elvis Presley records. When the Beatles arrived, at home it became a fight between my brother, who loved Elvis and I, who loved the Beatles.. but we both stayed the course....
    • Manuel Sanguinetti, lead singer of the Peruvian super-group Traffic Sound, and formerly a member of Los Hang Ten's, on how he acquired his taste for early rock, in an interview with Movistar Música's Marshall, taped on November 22, 2017.
  • I just wanted to be like my dad. He was absolutely charming, adorable and irresistible. I looked at him the way other people looked at him, like if he was Elvis. I was like: ‘Man I want what he’s got!’ I didn't realize I was born with it.
    • Carlos Santana, in reply to a question as to how he recalls growing up in Tijuana, as published by the San Diego Union Tribune on 22 September, 2016.
  • He liked to do the bumps and grinds as I did them, and that was basically what he used in his routine from 1957. Eventually, he proposed to me, but I told him if anyone knew about us it would cost him his career.
    • Tura Santana's claim about Elvis picking up on her movies after seeing her at ba burlesque show, as noted on the book "All the King̪s women"
  • On stage, any chance I get to put the teeth in and bite people, I will take. “Dance of the vampires" is great if only because it lets itself to be really, really silly. Any character I play has at least one if not three animal images that I use. And for the role of Count von Krolock, I said he's part panther, part eagle, and part Elvis Presley. And Elvis Presley — he's sexy as hell.”
    • Drew Sarich US Stage actor and singer, telling the Moscow Times, on February 4, 2018, how he is preparing for his upcoming lead role in the stage play version of "Dance of the Vampires" which opened in Moscow in early 2018.
  • But my generation did not ONLY love America because she defended freedom. We also loved America because for us she embodied what was most audacious about the human enterprise, because America for us embodied the spirit of conquest. We loved America, because for us, America was a new frontier that was continuously being rolled back, a constantly renewed challenge to the inventiveness of the human spirit. My generation, without even coming to America, shared all of your dreams. In our imaginations, our imaginations were fueled by Hollywood, by the great conquest of the western territories, by Elvis Presley, and you probably haven't heard his name quoted often here -- but for my generation, he is universal.
    • French President Nicolai Sarkozy, during his speech at a Joint Session of Congress,delivered on November 8, 2007, explaining how Elvis and American values influenced all French people born in the immediate aftermath of the end of the Second World War, as was his case.
  • If you ‘failed’, you are in good company. It's comforting to read a list of successful of people who at some stage of their lives were rejected in their study or career paths. Among the many are Winston Churchill, Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, Vincent van Gogh, JK Rowling, Elvis Presley, Mozart and Beethoven. Almost all overcame periods of gloom, adversity and despondency.
    • Dave Savides, as published on January 4, 2018 at Zambia's Zululand Observer, in an article entitled "Matriculation results must be kept in perspective"
  • There's more chance of Elvis Presley being Chancellor of the Exchequer than John McDonnell. I've never come across such financial illiteracy."
    • Savvas Savouri, the chief economist at Toscafund Asset Management making a point of the futility of backing John McDonald for the post of UK Chancellor of the Exchequer, as reported in the Financial News on January 8, 2018-
  • While touring Memphis, I was in the dressing room and my knee went and I crawled into a ball and couldn’t get up. I was carried off by a big security guy called Michael who’d once played for the Miami Dolphins. I heard he had an important boss but he didn’t tell me who his boss was. But the next day his boss called me. It was Elvis Presley. He came on the phone singing "You Make Me Feel Like Dancing", down the line. ‘I love that song, man. I hear Michael has been looking after you and that you’re a great guy. And you need to come over to the house’. he said. I was stunned, and got ready to go to spend a few days with Elvis and his girlfriend Ginger. But the next morning I heard on the radio Elvis had been taken to hospital and died. Years later, I began to think I must have dreamt the whole thing. But I met Ginger at a dinner in London, and she said ‘Elvis had been so excited at the idea of spending a few days with you.’ I had tears in my eyes when she said that.”
    • Leo Sayer, on the day he almost met Elvis, in an article published at the Sunday Herald, on April 6, 2017.
  • Very proud that my father will receive the Medal of Freedom. That he’s getting it with Elvis is icing on the cake.
    • Christopher J Scalia, upon learning his father will receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom, posthumously, in a twit written on November 10, 2018.
  • i) I didn’t like Elvis before I went to work with him in the summer of 1969. I mean, I didn’t know him. I just didn’t like his music. I was into black music mostly and jazz so when I went to work for him on the first rehearsal I told my ex-wife, I don’t think I’m going to do this gig, but I’m going to go down and check it out, see what’s going on.’ I came home that night and said, you gotta come down and hear this guy tomorrow night.’ She said, you’re kidding.’I said, no, you got to come down and hear him.’ She came down the next night to the rehearsal and she walked away a fan. It was that immediate. When I walked in and I heard him I said, Oh, oh, I believe that I've been missing something. ii) In some ways Elvis was Conservative and in other ways he was very Liberal. He wasn't someone that was following some political line, you know he'd figure out for himself what he thought was right
  • Iconic celebrities never die because they are, in fact, a booming licensing business. Albert Einstein t-shirts. Elvis Presley guitar straps. Marilyn Monroe finger puppets. (These are all real.) If Samuel Jackson can wisecrack his way through Captain Marvel, then a hologram Tom Petty could perform a concert on behalf of a spirits brands at thousands of bars – at the same time. Muhammad Ali could teach your Orange theory boxing class. Julia Child would be in your kitchen with you to co-cook a Thanksgiving turkey on behalf of Butterball. Gone are the days when a celebrity can only be in one place at one time.
    • David Schwab, writng for Forbes magazine in an article entitled "2030: The Future Of Influence" as published in their March 20, 2019 edition.
  • The spirit of Elvis Presley, I feel it.”
    • Trapper Schoepp, after playing “Hound Dog” outside the Zippin Pippin on what was the 40th anniversary of Elvis Presley's last ride on the roller coaster, as published on the Green Bay Press Gazette on 19 December, 2017
  • He once rode a freight elevator to avoid fans but just as the elevator doors opened, workers were wheeling a deceased guest out on a gurney. “I hope I don’t leave that way,” Elvis quipped.
    • Valerie Schremp Hahn for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, in an article entitled Elvis in the elevator, Clydesdales in the lobby: New Chase tours tell historic hotel's secrets" and published on January 11, 2019.
  • Our country faced a similar challenge in the 1950s, when there was widespread apprehension about the safety of the polio vaccine. But when Elvis Presley posed backstage being given the shot before an appearance on the highly rated Ed Sullivan Show, the photo ricocheted across the nation and the world and triggered a rapid increase in vaccination rates.
    • Dan Schnur of The San Francisco Chronicle, discussing President-elect Joe Biden having been vaccinated against COVID on live television, in an a article entitled "Show me the vaccine: Steph Curry with the shot", as published in their December 26, 2020.
  • Elvis, to me, is a symbol of tremendous promise and that kind of American hopefulness, where you can come from nowhere and have nothing and build yourself up and chase that American dream.
    • Patti Sciaifa, member of the E Street band and Bruce Springsteen's wife.
  • There comes a point when the voice starts to wash over you. You get inside of it, start to really hear what he's doing, and you realise his singing has this extraordinary, effortless quality to it. Sometimes it's like listening to a stream of honey. It's a very smooth ride, the voice of Elvis Presley. I don't think you focus on the words when he's singing. I think he's doing what bel canto singers do – you don't listen to the words, "just" to the beauty of his voice-. When I say "just", that makes it sound as if he's denying you something else but, actually, that's quite enough.
    • "The Scotsman", review of the album "Love", as published in its 25 June, 2005 edition
  • He had a photographic mind, came prepared every day. I would have to say that if you, Carole, if you had ever have to do a scene with him, you be....... somewhat taken back, that's how his sex appeal hit you. His eyes, especially, so seductive...
    • Lizabeth Scott, in an interview by Carole Langer at Janet Leigh's home in 1996, recalling their scenes in the 1957 film "Loving you".
  • We went backstage and he told me he used to play me on the jukebox when he was in the Army in Germany. He admired the high tenor male voice – he was a baritone. I was and remain a huge fan of his. He was a phenomenon.
    • Neil Sedaka in an interview for the Nottingham Post, on October 30, 2014
  • Little Richard, he was the first one that really got to me. He and, of course, Elvis Presley.
    • Bob Seger as noted in the Seger file, an unofficial web site about the music of Bob Seger, dated June 1999
  • Lou Reed, Elvis Presley and Kurt Cobain.
    • Emmanuelle Seigner, wife of Roman Polanski and mother of Elvis Polanski, whom they named after Elvis, in an interview with VOIR's Patrick Baillargeon and published on their 20 de septiembre 2007 edition
  • So when the city of Albany came to the conclusion that the house two doors down from my house was structurally terminal after years of neglect, they had to dump a ramp of dirt to allow the excavator to make the climb. It was a thing to behold: The two-track beast would tear away a portion of the front of the house — first the porch, which had been replaced almost a decade ago after it had degraded to a dangerous sag — and then plant its claw deep in the wreckage and haul itself a few feet higher, like a mountaineer with a pickax. By the time it reached the summit, the house had been reduced to a cross-section: see the bedroom, see the attic, see the bathroom where for decades its former residents shaved and showered through the Depression, World War II, the entire life of Elvis Presley and the demise of Skylab.
    • Casey Seiler, for the Times Union, in an article entitled It didn't have to happen, as published in their Friday, June 14, 2019 edition
  • He is the Elvis of Racing
  • Halfway through the show, he asked that the house lights be turned up. After that was done he stated that he had told them not to sell the seats to his back and, since they had, he turned around and did the last half facing those of us that had only seen his back for the first. He was a great singer and showman.
    • Carol Sellers, recalling in Facebook the time Elvis performed at the Assembly Hall, now the State Farm Center in Champaign, Illinois on October 22, 1976 and as referenced in a link contained in an article found at smileplitelicom's October 22, 2018 online edition.
  • For any strategy to work, people first have to perceive vaccination as a normal part of life. That is why public health officials, nonprofit groups and major brands are collaborating on nationwide public service campaigns and partnering with celebrities to make vaccine more visible. The model for the celebrity shot dates to 1956, when few teenagers were getting the year-old polio vaccine. Two critical things happened that fall to reverse the trend. First, 21-year-old Elvis Presley got the shot in front of cameras before “The Ed Sullivan Show.” Second, the March of Dimes launched a wildly successful peer-to-peer campaign among teen social groups. In short, it leveraged the cool kids, but it may not have gotten the cool kids without the King"
    • Frances Stead Sellers, Deputy National Health Editor for the Washington Post, in a joint article with Bonnie Berkowitz and entitled " These are the pro-vaccine messages people want to hear as published in their April 22, 2021 edition.
  • Elvis would quote Peter Sellers’ lines from "Pink Panther" movies on tour. Things would be going crazy, and he would look at somebody and go, ‘Do you have rhoom?’ " in Sellers’ Inspector Clouseau accent. Or, "Does your dog bite?". Sellers, in turn, was a fan of Elvis, even playing in an Elvis-singing role in his last movie. "The Fiendish Plot of Dr. Fu Manchu"
    • About actor Peter Sellers and Elvis fascination for each other, as told by Elvis' bodyguard, Sam Thmopson, in an article published in the Las Vegas Review Journal's May 10, 2011 edition.
  • The book, by contrast to "White Rage", offers an extended view, spanning from pre-colonial plots to relocate Britain's human rubbish, to Thomas Jefferson's notion of “whiteness as an automatic badge of superiority,” to modern use of adjectives like “redneck,” “cracker” and “country boy,” such as in the specific case of Elvis Presley. Isenberg's greatest historical and sociological intervention is not just the idea that divide and stratification exist between races, or that such divisions habit within them, but that it has always been this way. American democracy has never accorded all the people a meaningful voice. The masses have been given symbols instead.
    • John Semley, reviewing for the Globe and Mail, writer Nancy Isenberg's book "White Trash", which according to the reviewer, undermines the myth of American exceptionalism and as published on November 29, 2016
  • He valued his fans and he treated them with respect. If anybody had a reason to be arrogant it would be him, but it's a great lesson for other musicians and people in general and that is the better you get, the more humble you should be. His music resonated with everyone and that's what made him so special, like Elvis Presley or Mozart"
    • Jack Semple, Canadian blues musician, interviewed the day after the death of B.B. King, who influenced his career tremendously, and as published by The Leader Post, on May 15, 2015
  • They have turned Soweto into a Disneyland for Nelson Mandela. They have tried to make him like Elvis Presley. Now with his death, so many foreigners will be going there, then they will say they have seen the real South Africa. Winnie will be there of course "showing off" how close she is to the poor of this country.....”
    • Writer Kim Sepgunta's, sarcastic recollection of a friend's reaction to the death of Nelson Mandela, as reported on the day after the passing away of his former wife Winnie, in an article published on the Independent on April 3, 2018, entitled "South Africans will pay their respects to Winnie Mandela despite her uneasy legacy"
  • I don't think there is a musician today that hasn't been affected by Elvis' music. His definitive years – 1954–57 – can only be described as rock's cornerstone. He was the original cool ii) That was the standard in my house, he's the only rock 'n' roll guy that dabbled in Christmas
    • Brian Setzer, as published in www.graceland.com ii) referring to "The Brian Setzer Orchestra's 13th Annual Christmas Rocks," a concert heavily influenced by Elvis 1957 Christmas Album, on 28 November 2016, as published by the Daily Press.
  • It all started when an elderly American woman once asked me: "Do people in South Africa know Elvis?" "Of course we South Africans know Elvis!" I replied. Or do we, really? So, I went on to write a paper and, using a historiographic approach, I attempted to explore how his image was first imported into South Africa, especially during the Apartheid era when there was no television, and media censorship was a fact of daily life. Additionally, I tried to reflect on the impact of the media – then and now – in creating images, fantasies and illusions in constituting the subjectivity of the Elvis of real life and the Elvis of sound, stage and celluloid in the South African musical imaginary.
    • Harry Sewlall, describing the chapter he dedicated to the impact of Elvis Presley in the South African musical imaginary as published in Acta Academica-s Volume 47, Number 2, January 1, 2015-s edition (pp. 54-71)
  • Oh yeah, big timeǃǃ
    • Shakira's reply to to New Delhi TV's Prannoy Roy who asked her if she was an Elvis fan, like her father, during an appearance at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland on January 16, 2017.
  • An economist called Elvis Presley, who's unfortunately deceased now but made a significant impact on economic thought, in one of his master treatises said: 'A little less conversation, a little more action, please. A little less fight and a little more spark...
    • Tharman Shanmugaratnam, Singaporean Deputy Prime Minister, wrapping up the seminar he had moderated before heads of the world's central banks gathered at the International Monetary Fund and World Bank annual meetings in Nusa Dua, Bali, on Oct 14,
  • So Brian, who I was producing then, and I went up to Las Vegas, and we're sitting there watching him and Elvis sings "Runaway", then says that he liked to introduce me to the audience. So, the lights go all over trying to find me, and they can't, until Brian, who is a shy guy gets up and says, "Heeeeeeeeeee's over heeeeeeeeeeeere", and points to me, next to him, in front of the thousands there. So I took a bow. Later we went backstage with him, for two hours and let me tell you, I have never seen a better looking guy in my life.
    • Del Shannon, in a 1989 interview with sportscaster Bob Costas, recalling the midnight show of August 25, 1969 at the International Hotel in Las Vegas, when he and Brian Hyland caught Elvis' act, then met him backstage.
  • I met him in New York during his 2nd appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show” in 1956. I was just out of the William Morris Agency´s mailroom and still a very junior agent. That night, they held a press conference right before he went on so I went up to him and said, “Elvis, they’re ready for you.”. He said, “Yes sir. I’ll be right there, sir.” I was 24 and he was 21, and I said, “Sir! I’m from the Bronx. You’re the first person in the world to call me sir.” He was the sweetest guy. To this day, I cherish the fact that Elvis Presley was the first person ever to call me sir.
    • George Shapiro, American talent manager and multiple Emmy and Golden Globe winning television producer, in an interview with Variety, as published on May 25, 2018.
  • While many people assume it must have been a difficult slog for an Arab like me to gain acceptance in the Hollywood of the 1960s, I beg to differ. They treated me like a God. I had a beautiful house in Bel-Air, under me was this singer, what was his name, tall super nice guy, he was a very popular singer. I could see his swimming pool. Now I can't remember names of anybody, it's extraordinary. Wait, it was Elvis Presley! So I used to look and see if he had girls in the pool. LOL. And then he died young. I was in the Bel Air house when he died in Memphis, and suddenly the house under me was always empty....’
    • Omar Sharif, his memory failing some three years before his death at the age of 83, in an interview with TimeOut Bahrain and published on March 28, 2012.
  • i) I spoke to over 140 songwriters whose work Presley recorded, and most remarked about his uncanny ability to capture the essence and make it his own; like a musical geneticist, he drew from every strand of DNA in a songwriter's work, which ultimately helped shape his own distinctive personal interpretation; just listen to the wide stylistic swath of genre-hopping material he recorded during his career – from Junior Parker's amphetamine-paced rockabilly classic "Mystery Train" and the poppin-perfect panache of Otis Blackwell's "All shook up", to the down and dirty blues swagger of "Reconsider baby" and the operatic grandeur of "It's now or never"-; and then there were more controversial and socially conscious anthems ("If I can dream" and "In the ghetto"), and introspective 70's fare like "Separate ways" and "Always on my my mind"; right away, you can hear the breath of a master stylist who breathed new life into every song he cut" ii) Growing up, Elvis Presley's quasi-gospel ballad "Crying in the Chapel" was the first secular recording allowed inside the Pointer Sisters' strict Church of God in Christ home in West Oakland, California. Ruth, Anita, Bonnie, and June were only allowed to listen to the radio on Sundays. On top of that, it had to be gospel stations. Thank God their mom fancied that song. In an extensive 2006 interview one of the sisters, Anita, reflected on the fact that it was so unbelievable that someone like Elvis could relate to the story in their song 'Fairytale' and want to record it. She thought Elvis did it beautifully and very pleased with his version, capturing the emotion in the song as he did. Ruth Pointer, also spoke positively of Elvis's final album 'Moody Blue' and defended him against charges of any cultural appropriation
    • Author Ken Sharp, in his book, "Writing for the King: The songs and writers behind them", as published in American Songwriter.com
  • He is a huge fan of Elvis Presley, even naming his own thirty bedroom mansion "Graceland" after Elvis's Memphis home
    • Author Karl Shaw, in reference to Robert Mugabe, in his book "The Mammoth Book of Tasteless and Outrageous Lists"
  • The Owensboro Police Department quickly responded to my accident in the Meijer parking lot on Sunday, where my dog Elvis, a purebred, had apparently put my truck into drive and hit another parked car. I posted a video on Facebook, explaining how Elvis had shifted the car into drive while trying to get to some bacon grease on the truck's dashboard. Alas, I had left the truck running and forgot to put the emergency brake on. which explained how the truck then rolled up at least four parking spaces, hitting a car parked nearby. Police said there were no charges, so Elvis and I got off scot-free.
    • Paul Shearn, in a filmed interview with the Owensboro, KY, Police Department, as published in Facebook, on September 3, 2018 and one of many examples showing why Elvis continues to be one of the 100 most common names for purebred dogs, according to the American Kennel Club
  • I loved him. There were two icons who changed our life in the 1950's, James Dean and Elvis. He was the first singer who was loved by both girls and guys. He brought us together, boys and girls, a revolutionary, had a profound effect on all of us, culturally, musically emotionally, spiritually, still miss him...
  • I used to watch the way he treated so many people with kindness and respect, the way he used to be so grateful to his fans. He used to say, "Shari, when I wait backstage to go on and I hear all that screaming and I know it's for me, well, sometimes I feel as if my head is going to get real big with all that kind of fuss and stuff. Then I think that my dad drove a truck and that but for the grace of God I'd be drivin' one too. You have to have humility, Shari," he would tell me. "You can never forget who put you where you are and how many people would like to change places with you".
    • Sharon Sheeley, songwriter for Glen Campbell, Ricky Nelson, Brenda Lee and her own former fiancé, Eddie Cochran, with whom she rode in a taxi headed for London, on April 16, 1960 which crashed taking Cochrane's life and seriously injuring Gene Vincent and her, in article published in the June 1959 issue of Photoplay.
  • I think when I came out of the womb – I've been saying this but I mean it, you're born knowing who Elvis is. The name Elvis is just part of the fabric of humanity. He just is this thing that exists in the air, and contributed obviously so much to music. But I think he is the definition of what's cool."
    • Blake Shelton, as noted by G. Thompson in Popculture.country's February 6, 2019 edition
  • Elvis Presley connects Tupelo, MS to the whole world, the opportunities for cultural and educational exchanges abounding. When I went to Germany, I only talked to two types of people there, those that have been to Tupelo and those that want to come to Tupelo. After learning more about the area, a German tour company decided to turn a day-trip detour from Memphis into an overnighter in the All-America City.Looking to the future, I hope to see continued expansion of the Germany tourist market. City officials there have also agreed to pursue a municipal friendship. I think my there trip certainly will justify the financial costs and will pay dividends for years to come.
    • Jason Shelton, Mayor of Tupelo, Mississippi, interviewed both while preparing to leave for Germany, and upon his return, on the occasion of his negotiating the making of Bad Nauheim as a sister city to Tupelo, as published on the city's Daily Journal on July 18 and August 7, 2018, respectively.
  • We never saw energy like that coming off a stage before and meeting Elvis afterwards I found him to be a friendly, happy guy. Nice to everyone".
    • Top producer and guitarist Louis Shelton, a member of the Musician's Hall of Fame known for his extraordinary recording session contributions to Ella Fitzgerald and Whitney Houston, amongst numerous others, answering a question on those who inspired him to become a musician, from an interview by John Reid on Jazz Radio.
  • At the time, that was in 1972, I thought he was too old for me, but there was this chemistry between us. I felt a lot for him. I got to see him perform in Las Vegas — the greatest performer ever. I'm still really sad we lost him. I wish I could have been a closer friend to help save him. He was truly a kind and gentle man who never truly recovered from the death of his mother.
    • Cybill Shepherd, on her relationship with Elvis, as published in the Sedonas Red News on March 12, 2018
  • He was the first person to truly believe in me as a musician and gifted me with my first tour bus. For the album I am doing “The Day Elvis Died” and “I Want to Live Like Elvis". He gave me words to live by as an artist and to this day, I haven't forgotten them. He told me that if anyone forgets where they came from they're never going to get to where they want to go. He also told me that it was the people who make you who you are, so if you stay true to them, they'll stay with you.
    • Country music's T.G. Sheppard, in an interview with the SC Times, as published on September 11, 2018.
  • Graham never forgot his home state of North Carolina or the South, rivaling Coca-Cola and Elvis Presley as the region's top export.
    • Journalist Yonat Shimrom's laud of the Reverend Billy Graham, in his obituary and as published in the News and Observer's edition of 21 February, 2018.
  • We went in to scout the Hadooshi farm. We were gathering intelligence; there were quite a lot of buildings and compounds across the whole farm. We could see they were antsy. We went up to the gate, breached it. We caught them off guard. This one woman, she was just mean. Every time we walked through the garden, she went nuts. We noticed the garden was freshly dug. We started moving the dirt around, and we pulled up a big square riveted container. When we came across birth certificates, marriage licenses, we knew it was significant. It was like looking for (and finding) Elvis.
    • Staff Sergeant Sean Shoffner, Scout platoon, 1st Battalion, 22nd Infantry, 4th Infantry Division and one of the US Army soldiers who found the hiding place of Saddam Hussein. in reference to the fact the US Army's code name for Hussein was Elvis, as noted in an article entitled "Looking for Elvis" , as published in Esquire's December 13, 2018 edition,
  • We all automatically wanted to dress like Elvis, look like Elvis, swagger, strut, and sneer like Elvis – and every snide remark from Aunt Mimi, our teachers, or the newspapers only served to reinforce our new idol's grip
    • Pete Shotton, UK enterprenuer and one of John Lennon's earliest friends in an article entitled The Kings: Elvis Presley and The Beatles as published on the Beatlestory's August 27, 2020 edition
  • Many communities have a “this celebrity slept here” story. As a mountain resort, Idyllwild residents can share many but perhaps the most told is the time Elvis Presley spent three weeks there in 1961 to film “Kid Galahad. Visitors, starting in 2018, can now tour "The Hidden Lodge", built in 1947, one of five restored homes on the tour is one of many Idyllwild locations in “Kid Galahad. It’s the first time it’s been open to the public and it’s a lovely, lovely place. It was something the owners couldn’t pass up. The porch where Presley sang “This is Living” in the film is still intact. People will walk up, sit on the railing and strum their hand like they have a guitar. The home is an homage to Presley without going over the top. In fact, the tour is the Idyllwild Area Historical Society's lone fundraiser and usually draws hundreds of visitors..
    • Craig Shultz, speaking about the Idyllwild Area Historical Society's 18th Annual Home Tour, to be held on Saturday, Sept. 15, 2018 at Idyllwild-Pine Cove, California, as reported by the Press Enterprise on September 10, 2018.
  • I found him sensitive and very good. He felt he could have done better things. His advisors were very much against doing this kind of straight role and they tried to get him to sing throughout the picture. Obviously, they didn't want him to get off the winning horse. But when I was able to calm him down, I thought he gave a beautiful performance...
    • Don Siegel, commenting on Rollingstone magazine his directing Elvis in Flaming Star.
  • My uncle Bob was an Indiana hillbilly. He was the kind of guy who had a clear plastic suicide knob on the wheel of his two-tone Chevy, that featured a photo of a lady in a naughty cheesecake pose. Uncle Bob knew his Rock and Roll and all his nephews were all baptized in the church of Elvis. That early intervention saved me. Pat Boone may get to a higher place, but he should know before he goes that the Holy Ghost will have Elvis playing on heaven's record player
    • John Sieger, after discussing Elvis' powerful and majestic vocals in Crying in the Chapel, as published in Urban Milwaukee on May 17, 2017.
  • He was the atomic bomb. Period.
    • Gene Simmons's laud of Elvis following the announcement made that KISS costumes are now being displayed in Graceland's "Influence of Elvis Presley" exhibit, as reported by Broadway World on May 16, 2017.
  • This, I think, is as close to the "real" Elvis as we were ever permitted to glimpse during his lifetime, a funny, self-deprecatory star who loved to hack around with his guys, but who had no trouble reeling them back in when they started having a little too much fun. We, at home, watched and understood how lovable so many people thought he was. The show, when it aired, became one of the top-rated of 1968. Most of the TV critics of the time didn't get it, certainly not the way the show's producer and audience did, the critics being, frankly, rather bad stuck-in-the-mud old fogies and tired, bitter conscripts from elsewhere in the newsroom who were about to be superseded in the early '70's by a new generation of TV critics who had not only grown up with Elvis, but with TV itself
    • Jeff Simon, reviewing for the Buffalo News the 5 disc set commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the 1968 NBC TV Special "Elvis", in an article entitled "Maybe the greatest Elvis work has finally been released" and published on December 5, 2018.
  • The first time I heard his music, back in ’54 or ’55, I was in a car and I heard the announcer say, “Here’s a guy who, when he appears on stage in the South, the girls scream and rush the stage”. Then he played ‘That’s all right, mama’. I thought his name was about the weirdest I'd ever heard. I thought for sure he was a Black guy. Later on I grew my hair like him, imitated his stage act – once I went all over New York looking for a lavender shirt like the one he wore on one of his albums. I felt wonderful when he sang ‘Bridge over troubled water’, even though it was a touch on the dramatic side – but so was the song. It was unbelievable,and I thought to myself, how the hell can I compete with that?
    • Paul Simon, whose all time favourite song is Elvis' Mystery Train, as published in wwwelvis.netwhattheysaytheysayframehtml
  • But it wasn’t until 1958, when Elvis Presley teamed the item with brilliantine and attitude in the movie "King Creole" that the jacket crossed over to Main Street and became a much-copied American staple. Elvis always floated between Ivy League style and serious fashion and the Baeacuta G9 came in some great colors. When Elvis wore it was called the "Jivey Ivy" , which was Ivy League with a twist. After that almost every clothing company in the US copied it.
    • John Simons, UK men's wear retailer and stylemonger, explaining how the Baracuta G9 jacket, first launched in Britain, became famous in the US, then worldwide, as noted in an Yvy Style magazine article dated September 9, 2013.
  • He is a huge Elvis fan, his favourite songs being ‘Jailhouse Rock’ and ‘Suspicious Minds, and he can move like Elvis
    • About Carter Simpson, alpine skier in the 2019 Ontario's Special Olympics, in an article published in sootodacom, on 29 November 2018 and entitled "Carter loves skiing (and Elvis)"
  • By 1979, they were so prolific that Freddy was able to lounge in the bath in the Bayerischer Hof hotel in Munich, pick up a guitar – not his usual instrument – and bash out this globally successful tribute to Elvis Presley in 10 minutes. We are not worthy.
    • Dave Simpson, reviewing for the Guardian the song "Crazy Little Thing Called Love", which he ranked #17 in his list of the top 50 UK singles by Queen in an article published on 27 October 2018.
  • He rarely over-sang when recording, delivering a vocal to suit the song. So, he can loudly accuse in "Hound Dog" (1956), rasp and rage for "Jailhouse Rock" (1957), bare his soul and beg on "Any Day Now"(1969) and sound quietly, sadly, worldly-wise on "Funny How Time Slips Away". (1970). This gift may explain why his music endures so powerfully and why his performances remain so easy to hear.
    • Paul Simpson, in his book "The Rough Guide to Elvis".
  • Elvis' songs can be heard everywhere worldwide, which is perhaps why everyone is familiar with his voice. When you hear a deep tuneful voice with a Southern drawl in a rock 'n' roll song, it can't be anyone but Elvis (in spite of that voice actually being that of someone else "successfully" mimicking him).
    • Matthew Simpson, in his article "The Top 10 distinct voices in music", for ask.men (2007)
  • Remembering the legend and the super energetic actor who carved an extraordinary niche for himself, especially for his grooving dancing style. He was ahead of his times in everything and was the first among contemporaries to have mastered the internet. He was truly deserving of the title 'Elvis Presley of India'
    • Shatrughan Sinha's laud of Indian superstar Shammi Kapooron the 87th anniversary of his birth in an interview with The Quint and published on October 21, 2018.
  • At the risk of being sad for two seconds, I drink a toast to a wonderful fellow who left yesterday and did much for American Music. I knew him for maybe 12 or 14 years and we know, what he did in his career, but I knew him as a man, a gentle, good, fine man, gracious and generous in every sense of the word. Things which people never heard about him helping organizations, and children's hospitals but I knew all about that. He was some kind of cat and I hope God's good to him. ii) I am just a singer. Elvis was the embodiment of the whole American culture. Life just wouldn't have been the same without him. There have been many accolades uttered about his talent and performances through the years, all of which I agree with wholeheartedly. I shall miss him dearly as a friend.
  • My heart melted when I saw him in person but when he and my dad met for the taping, they were both nervous...
    • Nancy Sinatra, remembering the moments they shared with Elvis and his father, in Miami.
  • You were either brought up on the Beatles or Elvis. I was raised on Elvis, and every song he sang, every film he was in and every move he made is part of my DNA.
    • Jason Singh Australian singer and musician formerly with the band Taxiride, explaining for noiseeleven why he became a singer, as published on their May 6, 2019 edition.
  • During that last show in Indianapolis, he was on stage for an hour and a half. He included his own hits, pertinent covers and classic rock ’n’ roll, and there was a crescendo of gospel which was always a showstopper. It was a special show. He sang his heart out. Having only seen Elvis on stage in Las Vegas in previous years in front of an audience of 2,200 people the atmosphere was equally electrifying in front of 18,000, and the whole audience erupted when he announced that amongst them were 250 Brits.
    • Todd Slaughter, President of Elvis Presley Fan Club of Great Britain since August 1967, speaking about the last time he saw Elvis perform, which was also his last, in an interview with the Big Issue published on August 14, 2018
  • Elvis Presley has a very definite form of dance rhythm and this may well be what creates the hysteria.
    • Mia Slavenska, Croatian-born prima ballerina and star performer for New York's Metropolitan Opera, in an interview for the Toronto Sun in April of 1957.
  • After the show, we were headed out and about 20 feet in front of us, there were Elvis and his crew heading out also. Somebody right behind him yelled...faggot.. Elvis turned around and punched him in the face. Now that was funny..I was really glad I saw him do that. I would have probably done the same thing.
    • Foy Slayton, recalling the night he attended the then 21-year-old Elvis's show in San Diego, on April 5, 1956, as published in the Grants Pass Daily Courier on December 28, 2016.
  • Most singers have their idols. I remember Elvis Presley when I was about sixteen, I always said I wanted to do 'Love Me Tender.'
    • Percy Sledge, as noted in brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/elvis_presley_2.html
  • It's like Ron Howard trying to be the Fonz. It's hard for an English rap artist to have that kind of a cool "Fonzie" effect to Americans and a wide-variety audience. So either you have to go a comical route or something, a Pee Wee Herman-route. I don't know, something! You've got to come with something other than trying to be Elvis Presley.
    • Slick Rick, UK born rapper, on his struggle to connect the U.K. to America when it comes to hip-hop, in an article published by Billboard on May 20, 2018.
  • Each singer (of the so-called folk variety), is recognized as much from its characteristic sound, as from what they actually sing or play, and they manipulate tone colour with a virtuosity that owes nothing to either the classical, or the Tin Pan Alley tradition; one thinks, for example, of the voice of Elvis Presley, an expressive vehicle, shifting from high to low tones, groaning, sluring, and producing breathless changes of rhythm; to many listeners, the voice may have seemed crude, but its folk immediately resided in its crudeness.
    • Christopher Small, in his book "Music, Society, and Education", published in 1996
  • I was in Holland and our dressing room was next door to the one being used by the supergroup The Last Shadow Puppets. Anyways, I went to the toilet and who walks in but Alex Turner? He is a hero of mine and, to me, he looked like Elvis Presley...
    • Radio X's Gordon Smart, on the night he met Alex Turner, occasional member of the Last Shadow Puppets, and frontman for the Artic Monkeys
  • What's better than Jaden Smith rapping about Elvis Presley and driving around with Harry Potter in the most surreal of ways? Well, Jaden Smith rapping about Elvis Presley and driving around with Harry Potter in the most surreal of ways and with only other voices as his accompaniment.
    • About Will Smith's son Jaden Smith's "U", a song included on his first album entitled "Syre", in an article by Hilary Hughes as published in MTV News on December 28, 2017.
  • The medium of TV and the birth of Elvis came at exactly the same time. Before, it didn't matter as much what you looked like, with radio or records. With Elvis, it was the whole package.
    • John W. Smith Curator at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, PA, describing the impact of Elvis during the first-time-ever exhibit of Warhol's "Elvis X 11", as part of a show entitled 'Where is Elvis? The Man and His Reflection' , as noted by Leslie Rubinkowski of wwwelviscomau on June 14, 2003
  • I’m taking my momma to see it. In the words of Elvis himself “Thank you very much!”
    • Kevin Smith's laud of Baz Luhrmann's 2022 biopic "Elvis"
  • I worked in a credit store and he came in to open an account. I asked his name and he wouldn't give it to me if I didn't give him mine first. LOLː Same with the phone, the address. LOL. Anyways, that's how I met him, and then he introduced me to his first cousin Gene, and it all started from there. Years later he and all his entourage were at a Cadillac dealership in downtown Memphis. It was Xmas. He gave each and every one of them a Caddy and, as he was waiting for a special Caddy he had ordered he saw an African American lady who was waiting for her husband to pick her up. So finally he shows up, with a cranky Concord. It was then that Elvis asked her how a lady of her age was s still working.And the lady said that was how all the bills would be paid, rent, etc. So, when his car finally arrived there, he gives her the car he had ordered. With all the commotion, everyone had left, the lady left, left the Concord there, and Elvis was standing in the middle of Beale Street, alone, in the middle of the night. He saw a light in a nearby store, so he asked the African American who was there cleaning to give him a ride home, as all his friends had left, and so had the African American lady, he explained. Willie, that was his name, who didn't know who Elvis was at first, told him that if he waited, he would take him to Graceland but warned him his car did not have seats in the back and that the one in the passenger side, up front, was broken, so Elvis told him he will sit anywhere to get home. Once there he asked him for his address and work number, as he didn't have a home phone. The next day Willie was invited to Graceland and when he came in, he drove there with a brand new car...
    • Louise Smith, the widow of Elvis' first cousin Gene Smith, recalling the time Elvis gave away twp cars to two African Americas in less than 24 hours, as told in an interview on January,7 2019, in Memphis.
  • A lot of Presley's good stuff was overlooked. Like the NME viewpoint that he died when he came out of the army. I think the opposite, his best stuff came after the army. Look, Elvis was the King right? To me, Elvis IS King 'cos he sustained it
    • Mark E. Smith, as excerpted from a NME 1989 conversation between him Nick Cave and Shane McGowan and dubbed as "The Pop Summit.
  • i)The Houston Rodeo people didn't want us to come. There was a message sent to leave the black girls, they didn't need the black girls. And so Elvis responded with, 'Well if they don't come, I don't come'. But he was really upset about it. There was one person in particular who had sent the message. So when we got there, we were greeted by this little blonde in a convertible and she had to drive us around and she was his daughter. So Elvis always made sure he got even. I'm sure he said, 'And I want your daughter to drive them'. But, when it was happening we didn't know. We learned that later ii) When in true form, he was fabulous, his voice and vocal pitch a lot more remarkable than it ever came off on record; in fact, Elvis was a much better singer than could ever be captured; you know, some singers' voices are just too big, and Elvis' was like that.
    • Myrna Smith, singer of the gospel group "The Sweet Inspirations", who performed with Elvis for a number of years in the last phase of his career, as published in i) an interview with ElvisAustralia ii) an article entitled "Elvis, musical prodigy" in www.elvis.com.au, on 6 July 2000
  • To me, Bob Dylan always represented rock'n'roll – I never thought of him as a folk singer or poet or nothing. I just thought he was the sexiest person since Elvis Presley
    • Patty Smith, in an interview in 1996 with Sonic Youth's Thurston Moore and as published on FarOut magazine's November 22, 2018 edition
  • It was at age 13, in 1977, when I would discover my real passion while watching the live TV coverage of Elvis Presley's funeral. I liked the immediacy of it all, and I knew right then I wanted to do that someday...
    • Shepard Smith, Fox News principal breaking news anchor, detailing what made him decide to become a newsman, in an interview published a nikkiswiftcom on October 29, 2018.
  • Elvis Presley came to Weeki Wachee. He could have gone anywhere, but he came here. He was so good looking and he was this total, ultimate Southern gentleman. He had each one of us come up and he presented to us his latest record. He signed mine 'Warmest wishes, to Vicki. Elvis Presley". I always tell the audience before each show that I did swim, as a mermaid, for Elvis Presley and that he was so cute! But so was I in 1961!"
    • Vickie Smith, in 2018, the oldest living performer at the Weeki Wachee Springs's Mermaid show, in an article published at NBC's News Channel 8 on July 31, 2018.
  • Older than Red State versus Blue State, older than the Montagues versus the Capulets, humankind’s primal combat is the age-old conflict between the Early Birds and the Night Owls. Early Birds are those who for some reason think a sunrise is one of life’s great experiences. At their helm is Benjamin Franklin, who famously said, “Early to bed, early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.”. Night Owls are those who believe the pleasure of staying up late is exceeded only by that of sleeping in the next morning—or the next afternoon, if it comes to that. Their hero is Elvis Presley, who famously said, “The sun’s down and the moon’s pretty; it’s time to ramble.”
    • Martin Snapp, writing for the University of California's California magazine, in an article entitled "What’s The Deal with Daylight Saving Time? as published on October 30, 2018.
  • He was causing riots wherever he went. On May 5, 1955, he was chased at intermission and across the field by a pack of women at Ladd Stadium in Mobile, right after he finished singing, which had been set to start before intermission....
  • Chris Richards should look up the accomplishments of Elvis Presley. Presley did more to further black music than any artist on the planet. He made it acceptable and paved the way. Almost all rock historians agree. Richard's article quoted an obscure obscenity from one racist musician but did not include even one of hundreds of positive quotes from his rivals of the day, who loved Presley and his uniting spirit.
    • Sonya Lynn Snyder, of Palm Coast, FL, in a letter to the Editor of the Washington Post, published on November 30, 2018, in which she issues a strong critique of the writer's narrative in an article entitled, “With Medal of Freedom for Elvis, Trump sends a message” and dated November 16, 2018.
  • In some ways, the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG's) can already be called a success due to its democratic accountability and the active involvement of civil society, but I would like to quote the famous philosopher Elvis Presley, in one of whose timeless hits he asked for “A little less conversation, a little more action -please”. So let's listen to Elvis – and act now!
    • Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg, from her speech at the UN on how best to make the SDGs work, as published by Norway's mission to the UN on September 25 2015.
  • If one goes to the Licensing Convention in Las Vegas, the three most iconic images of the 20th century are Elvis, Marilyn Monroe and Muhammad Ali.
    • Michael W. Sonnenfeldt, US entrepreneur, philantrophist and political activist, as noted in a Bloomberg/Quint article published on their December 15 2018 online edition.
  • Imagine growing up in post-war Britain. Ration coupons. Rain-slick streets. Bombed-out terraces of dingy brick. And then, shimmering on the horizon, the prospect of salvation: American popular culture. Who needs spirit-sapping austerity when Elvis Presley can cheer you up?
    • Alastair Sooke, English art critic and broadcaster, in reference to UK Pop Artist Peter Blake's 1959 painting "Girls with their hero", in his review for the Telegraph of the "Pop Art in a Changing Britain" exhibit, by the Pallant House, and as published on February 21, 2018.
  • As with Marilyn, Liz and Marlon, Warhol instinctively understood the Elvis brand as an industrialized construct and radically revealed it as a precisely composed non-reality. Of course Elvis offered Warhol the biggest brand of all, and he accentuates this by choosing a manifestly contrived version of Elvis-the-film-star, rather than the raw genius of Elvis as performing Rock n' Roll pioneer.
    • Auction house Sotheby's laud of Elvis, as detailed in their catalogue prior to the sale of Andy Warhol's "Double Elvis" which went under the hammer for US37.5 million on May 9, 2012
  • Don't get too hot and bothered. We have heard some expressions of annoyance among the older set over the current teenage rage, a young hillbilly entertainer named Elvis Presley. We were about to identify Mr. Presley more explicitly as a singer, but out of deference to sensitive feelings we chose the less controversial noun. Elvis puts on the most active act on TV, contorting his face and body as though in great pain, whomping the daylights out of his defenceless guitar, and uttering unintelligible shrieks and groans. The latter manifestations, preserved on phonograph records, are selling like mad. A good many parents seem fearful for the future of American youth if it can see merit in Mr. Presley's aggravated assaults on the musical idiom. We would remind such worriers of their own youth. Don't they recall their parents threatening to smash the loud speaker of the battery radio if Rudy Vallee megaphoned the 'Maine Stein Song' through it once again? Or fretting over juvenile appreciation for Cab Calloway's scat lyrics? But somehow the youngsters of yesterday grew up to be the sensible citizens of today, and now Rudy's crooning and Cab's hi-de-hi sound sort of pleasantly old-fashioned. So brace up, parents of '56. In another 20 years Elvis Presley really won't seem so bad, and your grown-up teenagers will be biting their nails over the entertainment sensation of '76."
    • Southwestersontario's 1956 take on the advent of Elvis Presley and predictions of his taming, as published on August 20, 2018.
  • So you went into this movie really tuned...
    • Kevin Spacey, answering a reporter who said she never liked Nixon or Elvis, as recorded on their press conference on May 6, 2016.
  • The budget is $269 million and Montpetit thinks it will finish under budget. We’re in the middle of a resurgence in the capital, and called the old train station part of a cultural landscape, a national landscape that once saw soldiers leave for war and return years later and one that welcomed Winston Churchill, the Emperor of Japan, and Elvis Presley.
    • Tom Spears, for the Ottawa Citizen, in an article its old conference centre slowly becoming the Canadian Senate
  • He's a great singer. Gosh, Elvis is so great. You have no idea how great he is, really, you don't. You have absolutely no comprehension—it's absolutely impossible. I can't tell you why he's so great, but he is. He's sensational. He can do anything with his voice. Elvis can make some masterful records and can do anything. He can sing any way you want him to...
    • Phil Spector, record producer, the originator of the "Wall of Sound" technique in an interview with Rollingstone magazine in 1969.
  • The “Hamilton” fiasco, with members of the hit Broadway show berating Vice President-elect Mike Pence from the stage, brought to mind another New York event from 44 years ago, when entertainers – at least some of them – had a vastly different idea of their place in American culture. On June 9, 1972, Elvis Presley, about to perform a series of sold-out concerts at Madison Square Garden, held a press conference. It being 1972, it was inevitable that he would be asked about what was then a new phenomenon: the politicization of the arts. One questioner asked him, “Mr. Presley, as you’ve mentioned your time in the service, what is your opinion of war protesters and would you today refuse to be drafted?”Elvis answered: “Honey, I’d just sooner keep my own personal views about that to myself cause I’m just an entertainer and I’d rather not say. Asked next “Do you think other entertainers should also keep their personal views to themselves, he answered: “No, I can’t even say that!” Elvis was right. The cast of “Hamilton,” and the legions of their virtue-signaling followers are wrong. Elvis, unlike them, grasped that audiences might enjoy “Heartbreak Hotel” or “Suspicious Minds,” or “Hamilton” or any other work of art of any genre, without necessarily subscribing to, or caring about, or even knowing, the political views of the artist. . The performing arts are growing increasingly politicized, and that is why it is harder and harder to find apolitical entertainers like Elvis. It will take performers of courage to remember that no one own the culture, and to regain the spirit of Elvis and go back to being simply entertainers. Until those performers emerge, the stage and screen will find their audiences steadily diminishing, and fewer and fewer political enemies in the audience to lecture. If the “Hamilton” cast doesn't want them around, there are plenty of Elvis records to play to while away the evening.
    • Robert Spencer, for Canadian Free Press, published on 22 November, 2016
  • It remains a camp and cult classic and was one of my favourite films during my formative years.
    • Multi-Oscar winning Director Steven Spielberg, referring to Elvis' 1963 MGM film "Viva Las Vegas", which he saw as a then 17 year old film student, and as published in neraroramacom
  • Even as a young man, that's what Presley sounded, like a man. I wasn't of a culture nor a region that found Presley appealing, and I've never seen a Presley movie through but, a few years ago when in a tribute to him various modern singers covered some of his originals, followed, or enclosed by, his versions of the same songs, I was struck by how much fuller, deeper, and richer his were.
    • Al Spike, explaining to North Africans why Presley's manly baritone rang true, in the web`s "Chicago Boyz".
  • I was sitting at a writing desk in a hotel lobby writing a letter, and he just came up to me and started talkin How could you not know who he was even then?. I was friendly and told him I loved his record, Heartbreak Hotel.Then he took me to the gift shop to show me a magazine. This says I'm a hillbilly. I'm not, am I?' he said, 'No, you're a singer.' And after that I was with him and the guys all the time. There wasn't a crowd then, just a few guys. Back then,Elvis was surrounded by the first wave of what would become known as the Memphis MafiaI was the only woman in the group. Girls come and go but sisters stay forever. This sister lasted forever. We were friends till the day he died. We werelike kids in 1956 In the afternoons in Las Vegaswe would ride bumper cars at an amusement parkand went out for adventures wherewecould escape the crwds. He loved the fact that I had a light blue Cadillac, and he bought the same car for his mother in pink. One day we drove my car out into the desert, and his cousin came with us. Elvis drove that car as fast as it could go, and I was in the front seat whooping and screaming and laughing. His cousin was on the floor in the back he was so scared. But I'd been a stunt player in the movies, and Elvis couldn't go fast enough to scare me. When they visited Graceland, westayed up all night listening to Elvis singing and playing the piano. He liked to sing hymns. I didn't know any hymns, but I do now. He introduced me to Amazing Grace." in Los Angeles, where Elvis made movies, I remember going out on a Sunday with him and his friend, actor Nick Adams.Elvis decided to stop in a sports store and buy us bows and arrows. It was just whimsy. We went up to Mulholland Drive and were shooting bows and arrows, and nobody saw us. When his mother, Gladys, died in 1958, Judy came to the funeral. I've never seen anyone as sad as Elvis was. He grieved. He cried continuously. We were in the front hall at Graceland, and he stood there hugging me for a half-hour. He was crying and crying and crying. It was the saddest thing I'd ever seen.In later years, I attended his Las Vegas concerts, and he would stop the show to introduceme to the audience. I had married by then and so had he. By the time drugs invaded his life,I was less involvedI never think of him as he was the last year or year and a half," I think of him as so vibrant and beautiful and funny. When he died, a whole part of my life changed, and I died a little."
    • Judy Spreckels, a close friend of Elvis, and the former wife of Hawaiian based Sugar Baron Adolph B. Spreckels Jr, in an interview with TIME, as published in its August 20, 1958 edition.Elvis' as wel as in aarticle n the Ag published on August 13, 2002
  • I'd seen Elvis seated on first class as I entered the plane, so when he came to the coach section before the plane landed and went up and down the aisle signing autographs to all of us there I said “Hey, would you sign this for my girlfriend Allison, you know, Steve Binder manages me,” and he said, “Yes, Yes, I love Steve, Steve’s great,” It didn't then mean much to me (1972), but it was all pretty cool and he was a very sweet guy. In fact, I wasn't a big Elvis fan at the time, but I am now.
    • Australian singer and songwriter Rick Springfield, recalling his meeting Elvis, who he feels is one half of the most celebrated couple of individuals he ever met, the other being Paul McCartney. In Elvis' case, it was on a commercial airplane Springfield's had taken en route to his native Australia but with a layover in Hawaii where Elvis was headed for a vacation in May of 1972. Abridged from two interviews, one published by the AV Club's online page on April 2 of 2016, the other from the Chicago Tribune, dated December 01, 2011, where Springfield recounted how his girlfriend was later crushed, the autograph never reaching her, stolen as it was a bit afterwards along with a a recorder he always travelled with, during that long, long Springfield flight from Los Angeles.
  • i) FUN ... it is waiting for you, Mr. and Mrs. Everyday American, and guess what? It is your birthright,” writes Springsteen of that galvanic Elvis moment. Springsteen’s familiar stage voice, his corny carny barker way with action verbs, leaps from the page in assessing what Elvis promised: “The life-blessing, wall-destroying, heart-changing, mind-opening bliss of a freer, more liberated existence. ii) Somewhere in between the mundane variety acts on a routine Sunday night in the year of our Lord 1956, THE REVOLUTION HAS BEEN TELEVISED iii) There have been a lotta tough guys. There have been pretenders. And there have been contenders. But there is only one king.iv)it was like he came along and whispered some dream in everybody’s ear, and somehow we all dreamed it. ii) When I heard it, it just shot straight through to my brain. And I realized, suddenly, that there was more to life than what I'd been living. I was then in pursuit of something and there'd been a vision laid out before me. You were dealing with the pure thrust, the pure energy of the music itself. I was so very young but it still hit me like a thunderbolt.
    • Bruce Springsteen, in his autobiography, "Born to Run" published in 2016 ii) explaining why Elvis' version of "Hound Dog" is one of the eight songs he would take ti a desert island, as revealed to the BBC4, in an article published in Rolling Stone magazine's edition of 17 December 2016.
  • The way that I would entertain my family was via impersonations, and I had this very strange combination of who I would do: Yasser Arafat and Elvis Presley. That's just who I impersonated as a seven-year-old. My family was like, ‘Oh, these are good,’ and they would all laugh. I think it made them think I would be an actor.
    • Ariel Stachel, Israeli actor currently starring in the off Broadway hit musical The Band's Visit, as published in broadway com, on December 4, 2017.
  • Elvis Presley's Suspicious Minds and Cant help falling in love.........
    • Stacey of the Stacey & JSbu South African radio duo, focussing on her top two choices for Father's day, as noted in an article entitled " Stacey & JSbu share their Father's Day Playlists", as published on Zambia's East Coast Radio's June 21, 2020 edition.
  • I asked him if he wanted me to pull up. He said, 'No.' I said, 'Are you sure? I could leave a welt.' He replied, 'That's OK.' So I belted him. That slap you hear in the film was not put in afterward – that was the slap."
    • Joan Staley, remembering the scene where she was called to slap Elvis across the face as noted in the 2001 book Fantasy Femmes of Sixties Cinema.
  • Evis called and said that he liked to screen "Rocky", and that he was going to rent a theater in Memphis so that we could watch the film together. And I didn't go. I was shy, believe it or not. And I remember, when he died in 1977, I was doing "F.I.S.T". So now I try to instill in my children: Grab something when it's offered.
    • Sylvester Stallone, recalling the time he almost got to meet Elvis, in an interview with Michael Hainey as published in GQ's September 2010 edition
  • Elvis Presley was my rock ’n’ roll favorite, bigger than life to me. No one had seen somebody that looked like that or moved like that, not in staid, suburban, white society
    • Musician Michael Stanley, as noted in Cleveland magazine's April 29, 2019 edition
  • If Elvis were playing through a stack of amplifiers, he would be called a heavy metal singer today. The problem is some of the kids who grew up loving everything he stood for, are now journalists who have become what they feared most, parents. No one name says more than his, ELVIS. It roars while others whisper.
    • Paul Stanley, of the band Kiss, in an article published in People magazine's October 31, 1988 edition.
  • It's because you reminded me so much of Robert. He was gorgeous, and so are you...
    • Actress Barbara Stanwyck, explaining to Elvis, on the set of"Roustabout", why she didn't like him at first, Elvis' physical appearance somewhat reminding her of her second failed marriage, namely with actor Robert Taylor, from an interview with Sonny West, who was present at the Paramount stage when the conversation took place.
  • I credit my sister Cleedy and my father for the Staple Singers, because Pops would have her singing in a minor. Her soprano was different from anybody else's. And Pops had on his guitar a tremolo. He went to the music store one day, and he came back with this tremolo. I was too young to know who he was, but Elvis Presley told me one time, “I like the way your father plays guitar. He plays a nervous guitar.” I said, “Nervous?! That’s the first time I heard that.” But that was a good name for it. Nervous. Our sound was so unique. What helped Elvis was that when he did interviews, he would tell that he got it from blacks'
    • Mavis Staples, American rhythm and blues and gospel singer, actress, and civil rights activist, reminiscing about Elvis̪ roots, as published in elvisin australiacom
  • My mom brought me home from the hospital after my birth with the radio off. This, she told me, was so when we got home and she danced me around to Elvis Presley's “Can’t Help Falling In Love With You,” it was the first musician I would ever hear.
    • Seth Stapleton, writing for the Huron Daily's Saturday, April 21, 2018 edition in the award winning article "A Pilgrimage to the King".
  • Return to sender...
    • Words engraved in Freddie Starr's coffin, as noted by the BBC on June 13, 2019.,
  • If I fly in, can you arrange seating arrangements at one of his shows?
    • Ringo Starr's request to Ken Mansfield, who had formerly been the US manager of Apple Records, to arrange for him to attend an Elvis show on the last week of January of 1970, at the International Hotel in Las Vegas. Starr flew from Los Angeles, CA after Mansfield acted on his request, and they saw the show, but only Ringo was later allowed to meet with Presley personally, as told in the Beatles Bible, on June 20, 2017.
  • I didn't know him personally, but I was a fan of his, loved his music, energy and his voice: he had that fast vibrato that was so nice. At that time you weren't allowed to express yourself in those ways, so they showed him from the waist up, not the waist down. I mean, he was a little sexy guy! I was a little kid, but I asked 'Why won't they show all of him?' He would wiggle all the way down, and the girls would be screaming, and when I saw him on TV, I would be screaming too! And I loved the way his hair would shake when he got so emotional, you know? So when I got the chance to do his music, I welcomed it. (The racist controversy) never troubled me, because he wrote me a note. it was at the time I was divorcing Clarence Carter, and my stuff ended up all over the place, so I don't know what happened to the note, Back then I didn't think anything of it – I thought he would live forever but he told me he really, really, really loved my version of 'In The Ghetto". I have no idea where it is after all this time. Back then I didn't think anything of it – I thought he would live forever.”
    • Soul singer Candi Staton commenting on their duet video in an interview with Simon Price, from Oct 16 2014
  • I think the chances of that are roughly the same of Elvis Presley walking in here right now.
    • James Stavridis, Retired Navy Admiral and former NATO supreme allied commander. on the possibilities of nuclear war with North Korea actually taking place, in an interview for VOX on 28 September, 2017.
  • Elvis was my first massive record obsession. I didn’t quite move like him, but I use to dress up as him sometimes as a kid
    • UK singer Stealth's answer to Eileen Shapiro on who was his first musical influence, in an interview for the Huffington Post published on 16 March 2017.
  • Finally, he wove into ‘Hound Dog’ and bounced off the stage, carrying the mike with him. There, on the 50-yard-line, he sank to his knees, rose, wove, bumped, ground and sank again, time after time. The girls screamed themselves silly. If that may have been obscene, but it was in the same way the climax of a revival meeting is obscene. Elvis worked himself over to the grass alongside the stage, sank almost out of sight and suddenly slipped into the waiting Cadillac. A motorcycle cop roared out in front, the car drove off and quickly the bowl's overhead lights were turned on. The shrieks became groans of disappointment. But the ball was over, the spell was broken. Noisily, the fans began filing out of the stadium, spent.
    • William Steif, writer for the "San Francisco News", on assignment at the Dallas Cotton Bowl to find out, as he put it, "what makes Elvis tick" and as published in that newspaper on October 13, 1956.
  • My father, Herbert Stein was at the time Chairman of the President's Council of Economic Advisers and worked at the White House, often took me for lunch there where top dogs were allowed to have delicious meals, served by Navy Mess NCOs. We saw many famous people there, but one day, roughly three years before I myself started working there, he leaned towards me confidentially and said, “If you saw Elvis Presley in person, would you recognize him?” “I think so,” said I. “Well, look behind you.” I swiveled my hairy head around, and to my total shock, there was Elvis Presley eating with President Richard Nixon's Chief of Staff, Bob Haldeman a much feared but extremely pleasant and smart man. I got up, made my excuses to Mr. Haldeman, and said to Elvis, “Sir, everyone in the world is your fan, but I am your biggest fan.” In a voice and with a phrase that is incredibly famous, he simply said, “Thank yew ver’ much.” I was dazed. But I did not forget. And if you were to ask me to cite a lesson from it, it would be a line from a great Joan Didion novel called "Play It As It Lays: “You can’t win if you’re not at the table.” “Connections are golden.” Well worth remembering.
    • Ben Stein, explaining how his telling that story, over the years, led to his playing the role of the professor in John Hughes's “Ferris Bueller’s Day off", as published in the American Spectator's March 16, 2015 edition in an article entitled "Love is strange, but so was the effect of meeting Elvis"
  • Actually, he was an easy-going guy. No putting on airs, like he was some big star. An ordinary person, very polite, very obliging, a wonderful man, when I look back on it. It's a shame he had to go so soon.”
    • Karl-Heinz Stein, barber at Ray Barracks in Friedburg, who cut Elvis hair three times a month during his 17 month stay with the US Army in Germany, as published on the German way-s online page.
  • Elvis is like a bull in the ring. He belongs to the crowd—and they refuse to let him go.
    • Shifra Stein, writing a review of one of Elvis̪ last concert as published on the Kansas City Times' June 20, 1977 edition,
  • An oldies station was on the radio and it was playing that old Elvis song, 'I Want You, I Need you, I love you" so I just started singing my own song but it was 'I Want You, I Need You, I Love You.' I remember going home and I tried so hard but the best I could do was: 'I want you, I need you, but there ain't no way I'm ever gonna love you, don't be sad, 'cause two out of three ain't bad' So it was still a twist but it was my closest to a simple song, and one Elvis could have done.
    • Jim Steinman, on how he wrote Meat Loaf's "Two Out of Three Ain't Bad! as published on Smooth Radio's on the day after Meatloaf's passing ( 21 January 2022 edition),
  • Certainly the most famous performer to be attached to a tongues-speaking fellowship was Elvis Presley; shortly after the Presleys arrived in Memphis, from Tupelo, a First Assembly of God bus swung through their rundown neighborhood, so they climbed aboard and became regulars of Pastor James Hamill's congregation; Hamill remembers Elvis attended Sunday school and was exposed there to the best in Pentecostal music; in 1957, after he achieved international acclaim, Presley said 'We used to go to these religious sing-ins all the time, and there were these perfectly fine singers nobody responded to, but there were also these other singers who cut up all over the place, jumping on the piano, moving every which way, and all of which the audience liked, so I guess I learned from them'; uninhibited Pentecostalism gave young Elvis ideas about music and performance and, from then on, he was sometimes called the "Evangelist" by his inner circle of friends.
    • Randall J. Stephens, American Religion historian, recounting how Elvis got attached to Gospel and Christian Music, years before he decided to take up a music career, albeit heavily influencing it, as excerpted from in his book "The Fire Spreads: Holiness and Pentecostalism in the American South", published in 2008
  • When Elvis Presley rolled up his sleeve in October 1956 and was photographed receiving the new polio vaccine hours before his appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, he became a massive force for the wonders of public health.Before Elvis got his shot, the number of teenagers to get the vaccine was 0.6%. After the show, the rates went up to 80%.
    • Dr. Anne Stephenson, professor at Deakin University, as noted in an opinion entitled COVID-19 vaccines: Why Elvis impersonators can change suspicious minds" and published on ausdoc.com.au's 18th February 2021 edition
  • The Warriors had cut the lead to as little as two points in the third quarter, the inevitable onslaught stemming from a groin injury that took LeBron James out of the game for good. But then it was Stephenson of all people, former LeBron archival known for blowing in his ear as much as for his questionable shot selection, hitting a momentum-regaining 3-pointer as the third quarter buzzer sounded. True to form, he followed up the huge shot with his trademark guitar-playing celebration -- though this one had some extra hip gyration that would have made Elvis Presley stand up and applaud.
    • About Lance Stephenson, in an article published in CBS Sports 26 December 2018 edition.
  • I'll never forget it. We were in the rehearsal hall, and all of a sudden, we heard this commotion coming down the hall and there was this entourage of people coming into the room, When Elvis walked into the room, my mouth dropped. I'm like, Wow, I now understand why this guy is the biggest star in the world. He had magnetism. He filled the room. He really did. And to be able to sing with him for about a year and a-half of my life was an amazing experience. He was just a great singer. When you listen to Elvis' records, back in the day when he recorded, everything was recorded analog. There were really no computers to tune your voice or anything. He just had a natural talent. And he recorded in a recording studio just like he sang on stage. He held a microphone in his hand. He walked around the recording studio, and it was like he was doing a live performance. And he hardly ever shaded a pitch. He was just so talented, he really was.”
    • Richard Sterban, bass singer for the Oak Ridge Boys, who, along with a few others, voted Elvis as the top entertainer in CMT Top 40 artist countdown, as published in CMT´s online edition of November 21, 2014.
  • Elvis Presley, Hugh Hefner, Frank Sinatra – maybe not the kind of men you'd expect to embrace environmentally-friendly technology even if they were around to see it. However they were all diehard Cadillac guys, and we have to think that if anyone can convince its set-in-their-ways customers to go electric, it's Detroit's most famous luxury brand.
    • Jared Paul Stern writing in Maxim about Cadillac's first ever electric car, as published on their January 14, 2019 edition in an article entitled "An American icon enters the EV age"
  • Back in 2002, Eminem rapped about “little hellions, kids feeling rebellious — embarrassed their parents still listen to Elvis.” Plenty of those little hellions rebelled against their parents (and the carefree ignorance of the pre-9/11 world) and grew up into today's hipsters.
    • DJ Stevens, in an article entitled "ASK A HIPSTER, Is Eminem Elvis' heir?", published in the San Diego Reader on 29 August, 2018.
  • Elvis was big for me, even from a very young age; That was the music that was around my house; I love that stuff, great songs and, as a singer, he was 'The Great' rock and roll singer.
    • Rogers Stevens, guitarist for the rock band Blind Melon, answering Ben Bounds's question as to whose artist influenced him the most, and the earliest, as published in the Starkville Daily news (11 August, 2008)
  • One word to describe him̜? Sexy
    • Stella Stevens, who starred with Elvis in Girls, Girls, Girls, in an interview with Joan Rivers in 1992
  • Alas, this turned out to be his only time on UK soil...
    • Stewart Stevenson, Scotland's Minister for Transport, Infrastructure and Climate Change, speaking to assembled guests and the media as Prestwick airport celebrated the unveiling of a plaque heralding Elvis Presley's visit on 3 March 1960, a brief refuelling stop as he flew home from Germany after finishing national service with the US Army.
  • I believe we need to restore confidence in Illinois. We deserve a state government that you can trust. It has been my mission as your state representative to support, sponsor, and vote for common sense solutions that provide for balanced budgets, to resist tax increases without a commitment to responsible spending, and to secure jobs for working families. I believe doing so will help you have more faith in our state government. I agree with Elvis Presley. “Truth is like the sun. You can shut it out for a time, but it ain’t goin’ away.”
    • Brian W. Stewart, Illinois State representative, in an article entitled Restoring confidence in Illinois, and published on September 27, 2018, in rrstar.com
  • As soon as we were done with the first shot, he said, ‘You wanna talk?’ I was shocked. He pulled up two chairs together, we sat down, he took my hand and then he began to tell me about his mother. He talked about how much he missed her, how when he was in the Army, they wouldn't let him go see her when she was dying. It wasn't like he was flirting, he was just being very sweet and could not have been nicer.
    • Actress Charlotte Stewart, best known after appearing in the first four seasons of NBC-TV's "Little House on the Praire", talking to Fox News Entertainment, on April 26, 2017, about the friendship she struck with Elvis in early 1968 after performing with him a single unbilled scene in MGM's "Speedway"
  • i) I mean, they treat me like I'm Elvis there, they really do. ii) Elvis was the king. No doubt about it. People like myself, Mick Jagger and all the others only followed in his footsteps. iii)Bloody Elvis, beating me to the top from the grave.
    • Rod Stewart i) tells ABC News Radio.[1] ii) as published in www.graceland.com iii) joking about the fact his 2015 album was stopped from topping the UK charts by Elvis' If I can dream
  • The third day started with a biscuit breakfast on the bus as we headed set course toward Tupelo to visit Elvis Presley's birthplace. I had given our group a loose itinerary, but what the group didn't know is that I had arranged for an Elvis tribute artist to stand on the side of the road five miles out of Oxford with his thumb out, hitchhiking. We picked him up, Jack Curtis was his name, and he performed a concert of Elvis' classics, up and down the aisle of the bus, all of the way in to Tupelo. We got out to tour the Elvis Presley birthplace and my guests said, “I don’t know how you’re going to top this.”....
    • Restaurateur Robert St John, recounting the visit he and a large group of tourist made to Mississippi's best restaurants, and which included a stop at Elvis birthplace, as published in an article at the Meridian Star on October 16, 2018.
  • More than 30 years ago, the Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE) Fraternity joined the fight against childhood cancer when Danny Thomas, founder of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and fraternity member from the Gamma-Nu chapter at the University of Toledo, asked his fraternity to help him with his cause. Before Thomas could make his dream of building St. Jude a reality, he garnered the help of, inter-alia, Rock 'n' roll legend and fellow Tau Kappa Epsilon member Elvis Presley, who instantly became one of Danny's supporters by lending his talents to help raise funds for cancer-stricken children.
  • The most important entertainer in the 20th Century, certainly, and the only people that could even challenge him were the Beatles, but they weren̪'t single performers, so it̪s Elvis Presley.
    • Mike Stoller, agreeing with Jerry Lieber, that Elvis was indeed the most important individual artist of the 20th Century, as noted in a filmed interview for the 1987 BBC television special "Cut me and I bleeð".
  • We played Anaheim, CA in 1973. I was told to fix a problem with an unauthorized limo trying to get in the back entrance, so I tapped on the chauffeur's window but he said I should talk to the lady in the back. I knock, and there she was, Elizabeth Taylor. I was 22 but I had to tell her to walk through the entrance. Same thing in 1974, this time in Philadelphia, PA, but for once the unauthorized limo was carrying someone Elvis already knew, so he got to stay. It was Muhammad Ali.
    • Charles Stone, Elvis head of security, in a video filmed on 10 January 2015 at E P Birthday Festival in Stockholm, Sweden
  • I was always a fan of Elvis as I was growing up. When I saw him in Vegas, with Phil Spector and his wife, in 1971, he was just awesome, had tremendoous energy, charisma, such a handsome man, and a great voice, so actually there was nothing not to like about him. And then, after meeting him backstage, you realize that you are in the presence of someone so gifted, and that it's humbling, really.
    • Mike Stone, in an interview in the Ultimate Elvis channel.
  • Elvis Presley is a means of seduction, a tool of US imperialism, to make the Communist youth lose its values in the midst of a possible atomic war.
    • Willi Stoph, the then East Germany's Minister of Defense, in a communique signed in April of 1959, coinciding with the time Elvis was serving with the US Army in the then West Germany.
  • It as a real hoot to meet him. After he toured the plane he introduced himself, like 'Well, Ron, I guess you know who I am.' I said 'Yes sir, Mr. Presley.' And then he said 'Oh no, it's not sir or mister. Just call me Elvis.
    • Ron Strauss, pilot for Elvis' four-engine Convair 800 jet, the Lisa Marie, in an interview published on the Journal Sentinel's May 30 2019 edition.
  • I never understood his records at first, and then many years later, I thought, "God this guy is good". He had that wonderful sexuality about him, and energy, he was a star, you know, he was bigger than life. Anyways, because I'd met him a couple of times, singing with him was kind of easy, it felt like our spirits were kind of touching...
    • Barbra Streisand, on singing "Love me tender" with Elvis, thirty seven years after he had passed away, for her album "Partners", as explained on a clip published in her Facebook page, on 6 September, 2014
  • For international visitors, Amtrack is a very common and comfortable means of transportation. To eliminate that, because we're such a strong destination, namely with Elvis Presley home Graceland, Beale Street and Memphis music history being such big draws for international tourists, would be a big, big loss, as lots of people have taken Amtrack train and it has given even more people the opportunity to visit and fall in love with our city.
    • Jim Strickland, Mayor of Memphis, TN, commenting and raising concern about the possibility that 200 cities and towns across the entire US may lose access to Amtrak, as published on 31 March at the Commercial Appeal.
  • Multiple scholars have probed the Elvis cult's Celtic, Gnostic, Hindi, and vodun derivations; have contemplated Graceland's status as "sacred space"; and considered how and why some insist that Elvis, like Jesus, defeated death. Less charitable writers cynically attribute the entire phenomenon to the highly successful mass-marketing techniques of his estate and to the susceptibility of an apparently passive public bent on real-world escapism through, especially, the "transformative" ideology of consumerism.
    • Jim Stromberg Jim Stromberg, of the Univ. of Tulsa in his article entitled ̊Is Elvis Alive?: The Ideology of American Consumerism̊ , as published on 19 March 2004 at the Journal for Popular Culture.
  • I was with Elvis for a few months. He was so physically beautiful, I thought I couldnt breathe. So one night he said, do you want me to sing something to you? So he played his "Spanish Eyes" song and sang it to me, seven times, back to back, as I requested he did. He was kind to his friends, to his family, to strangers, talented, thoughtful, funny. This girl came to a party in his house and I noticed she had two prostetic legs. So I asked who she was and he said it was somoene he didnt know really, but invited to his oarties every fortnight so that she could feel wanted, loved.....
    • Sally Struthers in a Gilbert Goddfries podcast published on January 17, 2022.
  • The immediate feeling you have is of the entirety of his life. You feel a young man full of potential. On seeing this 13 acres, you realize that he was at a point in his life that because of creativity, he was able to buy it. You feel all the happy times and all the people that have come and gone, dignitaries and musicians. I just wished that the walls could have talked. But in actual fact, the real treat was the private tour of the mansion, which the good folks of Graceland gave to the General Hospital crew. One of the special features is Elvis' white piano and I wish I could have played it, but we weren't allowed on that side of the velvet ropes. It's a big, white Steinway with actual ivory keys. It certainly has a history and you could just imagine Elvis himself playing there.
    • James Patrick Stuart, Actor, voice talent, musician and the son of Chad Stuart, of the Chad & Jeremy British pop duo, reflecting on his visit to Graceland and as reported on the February 21, 2019 issue of Parade magazine.
  • The general idea is that Mississippi claims to be the birthplace of America's music and can pretty well back it up. The spiritual home of rock in roll in our state to me is Elvis Presley's birthplace in Tupelo. The B.B. King Museum and Interpretive Center over in Indianola, up in the Delta, that's where the blues live. The Grammys put in a museum at Delta State University, so that's the north part of the state. And the central part, kind of in the land of Jimmie Rodgers, is going to be Marty Stuart's Congress of Country Music Hall. That's where my collection, that's where the spiritual home of country music will live, as far as I'm concerned.
    • Marty Stuart, country singer from Mississippi, as published in Scene, on Apr 10, 2017.
  • The Melbourne General Cemetery has been operational since 1852 and houses prestigious monuments to Malcolm Fraser, Sir Robert Menzies and Burke and Wills. For 100 years, the 36-tonne Burke and Wills monument was the most visited spot in the cemetery – until 1970 when the Elvis Presley memorial was erected. It is located in such a prominent area of the cemetery that you would have to deliberately avoid it to miss it. During peak hour, as cyclists whiz by on the path, an elderly couple passes it while walking their fluffy dogs. It's a deeply unusual monument to find in the historic grounds, particularly when considering that Elvis never even visited Australia. But then, the 1970s were a strange time for the cemetery. For a while, it was the world's first memorial erected after his death and the only official monument outside the US. In fact, it came about in a whir of circumstances, including a mystery donor
    • Sinead Stubbins, in an article entitled "The enduring mystery of Australia's unique Elvis Presley memorial", published in the Guardian on August 18, 2018,
  • Though he is widely considered one of the biggest cultural icons of the 20th century, many may not know that Elvis stuttered. In a 2007 interview, his Tupelo childhood friend Mary Magdalene Morgan recalled how Elvis would stutter in elementary school, always seeming nervous, never completely sitting still, stammering, but not to the point you couldn't understand him. When he was 13 years old, his family moved to Memphis, Tennessee, where he would listen to a variety of musicians and singers on the now famous Beale Street. Influenced by country, gospel, and blues among other styles, Elvis recorded his first songs with Sun Record but it took multiple recordings and several rejections before one of Elvis' songs hit the radio waves in mid July of 1954. In an interview in August of 1956, Elvis talked about his stuttering: ʽWhenever I get excited, I stutter a little bit. I have a hard time saying ‘when’ or ‘where’ or any words that start with ‘w’ or ‘i.’ In fact, evidence of his stuttering as an adult can be heard on recordings from the Louisiana Hayride at the start of his career. On one of these, he can be heard stuttering when he talks to the audience in between songs. After he stutters, he stops himself, pauses and then begins again, changing the words slightly. Today, almost forty after his death he is still the best-selling solo artist in the history of recorded music. He had a dream to become a successful performer and entertainer, and he didn't let his stuttering stand in his way. People struggling with stammering issues can find inspiration in knowing that they share something deeply personal with the most successful singer of all time.
  • Elvis was one of a kind. He bought me my first car and that's how I attended my first Hollywood premiere. Elvis said, 'Kid if you're going to go to something like your first Premiere you deserve to attend in the right Style'. And he made sure that I did"
    • Michael St John, African American writer and actor of Carmen Jones (film) fame in discussing Elvis on his own Facebook page in 2009.
  • Growing up in Beverly Hills in the 1960s, there was no such thing as being star-struck — my neighbors were movie stars. Going shopping one day, after coffee crunch cake at Blum's, I found myself in front of the Beverly Wilshire Hotel staring at a man so beautiful and charismatic that I was magnetically drawn to him as if by a tractor beam. As I approached, he was swarmed by large burly men in Hawaiian shirts. ‘Let her through,’ he said. As if in a dream, I found myself in the magnificent presence of Elvis Presley! He signed my hand and a $5 bill. He spoke to me kindly and gently in soft Southern tones. The autographed bill? I spent it in my college tuition when I ran out of money
    • Rosa Sue, as published in the Newsletter section of the LA Times on October 11, 2016
  • In 1956, even the youngest of his fans knew that the 21-year-old Elvis Presley was unquestionably the whole package; and, obviously, his great three octave tenor voice, with a lower register close to bass, seemed to vibrate on the inner scale of every teenager in America; they loved the high tenor, but when he "got down" with that lower register, fans exploded; Elvis translated this into his moves on stage, so it was a 10.0 assault on the senses.
    • Sugarpie Productions essay on Elvis Presley, as published in Clay´s.Daily.Double.com
  • I wanted to say to Elvis Presley and the country that this is a real decent, fine boy, and wherever you go, Elvis, we want to say we've never had a pleasanter experience on our show with a big name than we've had with you.
    • CBS TV personality Ed Sullivan, closing his show on the night of January 6, 1957.
  • So who got covered on LIFE? Thirty-six covers from the first 64 years portrayed one or more of the Kennedy family. John F. Kennedy was on 25 covers, while Jackie edged him out to appear on 26 and earn the number one spot. Robert F. Kennedy appeared on five covers while Edward Kennedy was on nine. Rose Kennedy even made a solo appearance on one cover. Richard Nixon ranked third behind JFK and Jackie in number of appearances by a single individual with 15. Ronald Reagan had 11. But Marilyn Monroe beat him with 13 cover appearances, while Elizabeth Taylor was close behind at nine. Barbra Streisand made four cover appearances. Nikita Krushchev appeared on more covers (9) than Winston Churchill (7), Dwight D. Eisenhower (7), Franklin Delano Roosevelt (5) or Bill Clinton (4). The Reverends Billy Graham and Martin Luther King Jr. each made it onto two covers, while various popes appeared on eight covers between 1936–2000. (Those) never appearing on a LIFE cover included Elvis Presley, Monhandas K. Gandhi and Mother Teresa.
    • David E. Sumner, Professor Emeritus at BSU, in an 2001 article entitled "Sixty-Four Years of LIFE: What Did Its 2,128 Covers Cover? as published at the Journal of Magazine & New Media Research, Vol. 5, No. 1, Fall 2002 edition refers.
  • When Elvis' daddy had a heart attack, Elvis wanted him to have a private room. That was not the problem, but before getting there, rules made it impossible for him to have a private intensive care room, despite the unit was totally empty. So Elvis spent hundreds of thousands of dollars and booked the entire intensive care unit...
    • Bassman J.D. Sumner, of the Stamps Quertet, as noted in starsmeetthestars
  • I approve of his moves last night at the Pan Pacific (October 29, 1957), and saw nothing wrong with them but unfortunately neither my wife nor I could hear a single word out of his mouth because of all the screaming. But he is everything he is reported to be.
    • Czech-born, UK conductor, teacher, and pianist Walter Susskind, in an interview with the LA Times as published on 30 October, 1957. He was the Conductor of the Toronto Symphonic Orchestra at the time of the interview.
  • I may be the only person who knows Colin Powell and Elvis Presley...
    • Major General William K. Suter, then Clerk of the Supreme Court of the United States, as published on May 29, 2013 by the Harlan Institute. In all candor, Gen. Suter may have been unaware that, after meeting Presley in Ft. Hood, there WERE indeed hundreds of soldiers who knew both Powell and Presley, the former having led the latter's unit as a Lt. Col in Germany, during Presley's entire Army tour in that country.
  • They listened to music all the way over. And one of them kind of likes Elvis Presley
    • Jeff Sween, Chairman of the National Turkey Federation telling WHSV, Channel 3, about "Peas" and "Carrots", two South Dakota turkeys travelling through sleet and snow some 1,400 miles to DC in the hope to be pardoned at the White House, as customary during the 2018 Thanksgiving celebration.
  • We didn't care as much for Elvis and his music - but once we met him - our mouths completely dropped. We could not believe a man was allowed to be this beautiful. We almost lost our job with Elvis because we focused so much on what he looked like that we forgot the lyrics to our songs. He was without doubt the most beautiful man that ever lived. And what's more beautiful: he didn't know it. - Good Lord he was beautiful!
    • The Sweet Inspirations, in a shared post as published by the "Elvis Forget me never" Facebook page, on 14 March, 2022.
  • It blew my brain apart. It was like Star Wars combined with Elvis Presley and these crazy, sped-up electro beats that I'd known since I was 11 years old.”
    • UK Producer Switch describing his first encounter with a baile funk compilation in an article entitled "This YouTube Channel Is Helping Brazilian Funk Go Global", published by Vulture on February 11, 2018.
  • Some of Symms' most popular images came from a newspaper assignment covering the June 27, 1956 performance of a young Elvis Presley before 6,000 screaming fans jammed into Augusta's Bell Auditorium. When Presley arrived, he found Symms in an alley awaiting him with a 4X5 Crown Graphic camera. Most remember hearing Presley sing several hits including "Hound Dog", which he would record a month later, but it was Symms' photos which preserved their memories of the performance and continued to sell reprints over the next half-century.
    • About noted photographer Robert Symms, as published in the Augusta Chronicle on January 20, 2018.
  • White teenagers embraced rock and roll, when the civil-rights struggle cultivated an awareness of African-American culture. Youths such as Elvis Presley listened to late night, rhythm-and-blues radio shows that challenged and broke down racial barriers. During the Sixties, white teens readily accepted African-American performers such as the Ronettes, the Temptations, and the Supremes who had been carefully groomed for success in a mainstream market. At the same time in Britain, teenagers such as the Rolling Stones became obsessed with Chicago blues and brought their version of the blues back to adoring fans in America. Later in the decade, white youth bought soul records and revered Jimi Hendrix as the ultimate guitar hero. By the Eighties, young white suburbanites wore baggy pants and chanted the lyrics of inner-city rappers. In the new century, American teens danced at massive festivals to the African-American sounds of house music and techno.
    • David Szatmary, in the introduction to his book Rocking in timeː A Social History of Rock and Roll

T[edit]

  • He had it all going on: Punk, Algerian chaabi music, Rai, techno, and he drew inspiration from the music of North Africa, New Orleans jazz, The Clash, the delta blues and Elvis Presley.
    • Algerian singer and activist Rachid Taha's obituary, as published in Boing Boing, a few days after his death on September 12, 2018.
  • In 1957, I worked with Elvis a bit on ‘Jailhouse Rock,’ and got to know him as well as anybody in Los Angeles at the time. Anyways, that same year I had a beach house that I sublet to him while I was doing ‘Peyton Place.’ He needed it as a getaway, and basically wrote me a check for that month's rent. I wish I had kept the check, that would be worth more than the money I got LOL.
    • Russ Tamblyn, dancer and acrobat extraordinaire who visited Elvis at his penthouse suite at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills, on the night before the shoot of the Jailhouse Rock title sequence. Although they had never met before, the one week older Tamblyn and Elvis got along fine, immediately, then practiced a few moves and by the next morning, Presley had the complicated scene totally within his grasp, as noted in Elvis Express Radio's September 14, 2016 edition.
  • Presley makes no secret of his respect for the negroes, nor of their influence on his singing. Furthermore, he does not shun them, either in public or private
    • Tan magazine, an entertainment spinoff by the publishers of Jet magazine, in an article published in April of 1957.
  • No person should be allowed to be so great looking and with so much talent. LOL. He's standing on a stage all by himself, like a person in a boxing arena Now the swagger and the swooning are awesome, but the interesting thing about him is how he gets the emotion into the song. And it all sounds so authentic because he believes in what he sings.
    • Ken Tamplin, vocal coach, reviewing Elvis' "Cant help falling in love", the 1968 version, for his vocal academy, as published in YouTube on July 24, 2019.
  • That's it for now from us, at the first ever Presidential summit in Graceland, so thank you, thank you very much.
    • Jake Tapper's closing words after covering the Graceland visit by Pres. G. W. Bush and Japanese Prime Minister J. Koizumi for ABC TV News on June 30, 2006.
  • To me this album is the purest expression of Elvis there was. In fact, when I was young, I used to think Elvis was the voice of truth. I don't know what that means, but his voice, shit man, it sounded so fucking pure. The hillbilly cat never let you down.
    • Quentin Tarantino's laud of "The SUN Sessions", a 1976 issued album copmprising Elvis' 1954–55 recordings, as noted in the July 28, 2020 edition of Far Out, in a article entitled "From Bob Dylan to Elvis Presley: Quentin Tarantino created a list of his 10 favourite albums of all time"
  • I walked into the lobby of the International Hotel in Las Vegas with Tom Jones, which was like walking in with the Good Lord himself, and next minute we were in Elvis Presley's dressing room. As I stared at him, stunned, one of Elvis's assistants said to me, ‘Sir, will you give this drink to Elvis?’ I said, ‘Yeah,’ took the drink and stood there gaping, like a stagestruck schoolgirl. Couldn't move a muscle. Tom nudged me and said, ‘Give ’im the drink for God’s sake. I struggled to speak to Elvis because I was so overwhelmed and amazed to be in the presence of such a great singer. Next night, it was Elvis who came to Tom’s room. I was in heaven...
    • Jimmy Tarbuck, OBE, British comedian, a schoolmate of John Lennon and one of Tom Jones' long time personal closest friends, recalling the night in August of 1969 when he met Elvis, as told in the Express' August 7, 2020 edition
  • The reasons for honouring Elvis are not sentimental but political. I don't own a single Elvis album but he was a champion for those amongst our people who turned against our country's Soviet-backed Government in October 1956. And although the revolution was quashed, Presley saluted the uprising in January 1957 during his last appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show and performed "Peace in the Valley", a gospel standard, as a tribute to our plight. At his request, Sullivan solicited the TV audience to donate towards our relief efforts, raising US$6 million (the equivalent of US$ 49 million in 2012 dollars), or about 26 million Swiss francs.
    • Budapest Mayor István Tarlós, explaining to the press why Presley was named a citizen of Budapest and a Park facing the second oldest crossing in the city,the Margaret Bridge, named after him, following the International Red Cross' handling of some 26 million SFR sent by his fans, which they distributed to some 200,000 Hungarians affected by the Soviet invasion in both Vienna and London, where the refugees were allowed to settle for life, and as published in The Guardian's online edition of March 11, 2012.
  • Before Elvis, white America was shackled by crippling conservatism. Then, four years into the 1950s, a singer from Tupelo, Mississippi, had what record producer Sam Phillips was looking for, a “white man who had the Negro sound and the Negro feel”, language that makes us cringe now — but at the time, Elvis' "sound" and "feel" did more to break down color barriers in popular music than any white singer ever had. Elvis' low, trembling transmission to teenage America was emancipation in the form of rockabilly, gospel, schlocky love songs, Christmas standards and muddy blues. In the ’60s, his voice was muted by forgettable films, but in 1968, wearing a leather jumpsuit, he reminded America that the suffering in his voice was sex in a sexless society — a pink Cadillac crashing into daddy’s station wagon. —
    • Art Tavana, for LA Weekly, in an article entitled the 20 best singers of all time.
  • When I’m here, I’m not James Taylor the entertainer, I’m James Taylor the Elvis fan,’
    • Singer songwriter James Taylor, telling Rhonda Lamb, Assistant Director of the Elvis Presley Birthplace, in Tupelo, MS, how he felt when visiting Elvis birthplace, in an article published on the Daily Journal on September 25, 2017.
  • I was in California, saw "Jailhouse Rock" and changed my name to Vince Taylor, the former from the first name of the character played by Elvis in "Jailhouse Rock".
    • Vince Taylor, English rock and roll singer, very popular in France and the brother in law of Joseph Barbera as noted in Wikipedia-.
  • Elvis Presley. I don't do an impersonations, but Elvis is the most impersonated performer in the world. Just the more I've read about him, the more he's someone I've wanted to get into. I want to do the Walk the Line version of Elvis. Like Joaquin Phoenix doesn't look like Johnny Cash but I still felt like I was watching Johnny Cash in that movie.
    • Miles Teller's answer as to who he would like to play next, in an interview with Parade, published on October 24, 2017.
  • I strongly believe he knew he was ill, but didn't know why. In retrospect, his was a classic case of cumulative head trauma, followed by an autoimmune inflammatory disorder. None of this was known or even recognized in his day and I'm confident he would have been pleased to know that the knowledge that now exists about his predicament will in future help others, as he was a kind and generous person
    • Dr. Forest Tennant's main conclusions in his study and essay entitled "Elvis Presley: Head Trauma, Autoimmunity, Pain, and Early Death" as published in Practical Pain Management̺'s June 2013 edition.
  • Presley was very classically orientated with his voice, and diction, and very sincere and wanting to get everything perfect.
    • Bryn Terfel bass baritone citing one of the reasons why Elvis is the only soloist whose music he listens in his iPod, as told to NYT's Classical Music critic Vivien Schweitzer, and published on that paper on November 10, 2007
  • Elvis Presley transcended his being called the King of Rock and Roll, even the music he made famous, in favour of his later becoming one of the XX Century's greatest cultural icons. But it is his versatile voice and his unusual delivery of numerous musical idioms, as well as the attraction he held, physically, and sexually, that led him to his being the greatest solo artist in the history of popular music.
    • Terra, a Spanish online publication's views on the power of Presley's voice and it's being ranked as one of the ten most imposing in the history of recorded sound, the latter in conjunction with the celebration of the "Day of the Voice" and published in their online page, on April 15, 2015.-
  • He performed at the auditorium in 1955 and 1956. For the first appearance, Elvis was paid $150. He grossed $9,000 when he returned a year later.
    • Steven Teske of the Butler Center for Arkansas Studies, on some of the history to surround the forthcoming exhibit on the Robinson Memorial Auditorium, in an article published on the Arkansas Democrat Gazzette on Novebver 4, 208.
  • I couldnt believe I was singing with Elvis. My nerves were a wreck...
    • Thalia,in an interview for youtube published on January 3 2011, reacting to hos she felt when doing her duet on Love me Tender.
  • At one point, the Chargers and Raiders planned to share a stadium in Carson. Instead, the Chargers got Los Angeles, and the Raiders are headed to Las Vegas in the next few years. So, prior to this Sunday's game between the Raiders and Chargers in Carson, the Chargers trolled their rivals by playing Elvis Presley's "Viva Las Vegas" as the Raiders took the field at StubHub Center.
    • Ali Thanawalla, for Yahoo Sports, as reported on October 7, 2018.
  • For some people, they are just cars from the past. But classic cars represent an important market segment for investors. With their rising by more than 500 per cent in the past decade, the 2016 Motorworld Classics Fair in Berlin is a good chance for anyone interested in that kind of investment. A perfect example is a 1967 Cadillac Eldorado showcased here. It is not a very rare car, nor is it in a good state, but it was once owned by Elvis Presley, which bumps up the price tag to about half a million euros.
  • He didn't buy it for himself, he never used it, it was from the start an act of charity, and I certainly hope that once we auction it, it will one day be enshrined, as it has been the witness of history for almost two decades, especially during Pres. FDR's time.
    • Danny Thomas, founder of St Jude's in a co-sponsored radio and filmed press conference aboard the 50 meter long, FDR Presidential Yacht, the USS Potomac, which was requested from Elvis, as a gift, to St Jude' in February of 1964. St Jude's then sold it for US$75,000 (equiv. to a little over a half a million in 2018 dollars), on November of that same year, later disappearing for about twenty years, even capsizing, only to be recovered by the US Coast Guard and, as if to grant Mr. Thomas his wish, is currently enshrined as it takes tourists from Oakland to the Golden Gate and back.
  • Just last month, nurse Lindsay readily agreed to the request of 9-year-old Desiree Mohammadi, daughter of a Queens pediatrician, and held her small hand as a pediatric nurse administered a Covid jab. Afterward, Desiree sent her idol a grateful thank-you letter. The photos and video of the nurse who was the first person in the US to be vaccinated for Covid-19 will be in textbooks soon, but she is already inspiring children to seek a better understanding of both science and nursing.But perhaps the most significant reason that Dr. Lindsay is our Nurse of the Year is this: as Elvis did with the polio vaccine, she set an example that is saving lives"
    • Koren Thomas, Associate Editor of the "Daily Nurse", in reference to the achievemnets of Sandra Lindsay, DHSc, MS, MBA, RN, CCRN-K, NE-BC, who became the first official recipient of a Covid jab in the US on December 14, 2020, in an article published in their December 29, 2021 edition, which in turn named her "The Nurse of the Year"
  • Elvis was a great partner to St. Jude and was always eager to help raise money for the hospital.
    • Marlo Thomas, actress and social activist, as told on her Facebook page in conjunction with the anniversary of Elvis' death, in mid August of 2020.
  • People think that we're crazy because we do six nights a week, and then you see how much Elvis put into every show, for which he created this larger than life style, and he pulled it off.
  • I remenber when I took Elvis by the hand and slowly pulled him on stage. And I said 'Ladies and gentlemen ..... Elvis Presley!! And he did that willow with that leg two or three times and it was over and the show was really over and the people, these were black people, they stormed that place trying to get to Elvis. And never, never in your life have you seen such a surge of black faces all converging upon a stage at the same time. I know of only two people that would have that type of magnetism that would just, they could just pull people to them, the kind of magnetism to just draw crowds in instantly effect them. [Elvis being one], the only other was Martin Luther King. The fact is people like music and if it's good it makes no difference who's doing it, black, blue, green even plaid if it's like that. And I love good music and Elvis was doing blues, rhythm and blues because that was his beginning.
  • Ladies and gentlemen, the McDonnell Douglas aircraft have left the air. Yeah, they were as iconic as Elvis Presley.
    • Rich Thomaselli, for Travel Pulse, in an article bidding good bye to the TMD-88 and McDonnell Douglas MD-90 planes holding a revered place in aviation history and which retired on June 2, 2020.
  • There is nothing that could force Donald Trump to release his tax returns, but precedent and Hillary Clinton's willingness to release hers would have nudged most other presidential hopefuls into taking the action. All this reminds me of the fact that accountants for Elvis Presley begged him at times to take advantage of the legal loopholes available to him. It would have saved him millions. He demurred on the basis that the patriotic thing to do was to pay for the privilege of his success.
    • Dan Thomasson, columnist for Tribune News Service, commenting on the 2016 presidential election, as published in the Commercial Appeal on October 3, 2016.
  • What makes USA the most aspirational destination to Indians is probably our own pop culture. Out of 1.3 billion Indians, there are 700 million young people who are under the age of 35. By 2020, the median age is going to be 29 years and when I think about a younger demographic, everything in the United States is appealing to them. Pop, short for popular music originated in neighborhoods across the US, when people of various ethnicities came together and merged their musical talents transcends geographical borders, races, and even traditional music styles. It is the music of today. Traditional guitars or electric ones, playing of pop music is not restricted to instruments either. Elvis Presley, in fact, is one of the first stars associated with the popularity of pop music. He fused country music with black rhythm and blues and came up with rock-and-roll.
    • Christopher Thompson, President and CEO of Brand USA, in an article entitled "Brand USA Plays the music card" published by India Media Group on November 22, 218
  • One day in the 70s, I talked Elvis into going with me to the local McDonald's restaurant near Graceland. I was sick and tired of us never going out together. So I made a bet with him — I said no one would recognize him and he could relax a little. Elvis said he not only would be recognized but mobbed as well. We walked in the McDonald's, approached the counter, and put in our orders. Elvis ate his meal in wonder at the situation but really enjoyed his quiet night out. So far, so good. Then a man walked up to our table, looked at Elvis, and said he hated how men tried to look like Elvis Presley. He said there was only one Elvis and the others should give up. Shocked at the man's assumption that he was as impersonator, Elvis informed the stranger that he was indeed Elvis. The man would not believe him, and said he pitied him for thinking he was. Elvis tried again but could not convince the man. I thoroughly enjoyed the whole situation and had an inspired idea. I turned to Elvis and said, “Okay, Bob, enough is enough. Stop playing". Elvis told me to confirm who he was and I replied, “Will you cut the crap, Bob.” My ruse worked. The man left their table. Elvis was totally dumbfounded by what had happened, but he and I had a good laugh. Anyways, I was always a fan, but I didn't think he would transcend time and space and become the iconic, almost religion he is now.
  • As the lad himself might say, cut my legs off and call me Shorty! Elvis Presley can act. Acting is his assignment in this shrewdly upholstered showcase, and he does it.
  • Just as the producer's job is to achieve the best recording possible – the kind of perfection that so grabs listeners like Nick Coleman- so the editor should push the writer beyond the bounds of what he thinks he can achieve. It's hard to escape the feeling that there's a better book here waiting to get out. Essentially, this is a memoir consisting of 10 essays each of which attempting to examine a fairly arbitrary category of music. “Boys and Girls and Girl Groups”; “Vulnerability”; “The Spectacle of Anguish” etc. The opener looks at “The Horsemen in the Box” - Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis, Chuck Berry and Elvis Presley – who he feels would have represented the end of pop music history had the Cuban Missile Crisis not turned out so well.
    • Liz Thompson, writing for the The Arts Desk, in an article published on January 15, 2018. and entitled "Nick Coleman: Voices – How a Great Singer Can Change Your Life, highlighting Coleman's deafness then exploring the songs that linger in his memory.
  • I'm from Tupelo, where Elvis was born. When he would do a gospel album, he would always pick the great gospel quartets of the day to sing on his records. That's what I want to do."
    • Paul Thorn Southern rock, country, Americana, and blues singer-songwriter, in an article entitled "Paul Thorn revisits gospel roots before Blues & Roots Fest at Door Community Auditorium published" and published on the Green Bay Press-Gazette's Oct. 29, 2018 edition.
  • They're talking ‘bout the hood, talkin’ ‘bout where we all come from. My mother always listened to Presley' song when I was young. It talk about the things she went through, you know. She had a bunch of kids, like 9 kids, you know what I’m sayin’. That's how you get somebody to listen to your song, you talk about what they know about and what they want to hear.”
    • Three 6 Mafia members, Paul Beaureguard and Jordan Houston, discussing their version of In the Gueto.
  • To make things even harder, public-health communicators no longer have the benefit of public figures such as Elvis Presley, who once gave a lift to a national immunization campaign with a single photograph of a rolled-up sleeve. These days, even our most mass-appeal celebrities are not nearly as appealing. Each of them has done something to annoy some chunk of the population, and I’m even talking about Bruce Springsteen right now, and I’m even talking about Hilary Duff.
    • The Atlantic's Kaithlyn Tiffany, in an article on the COVID 19 pandemia entitled "America’s Health Will Soon Be in the Hands of Very Minor Internet Celebrities", as published oin their February 19, 2021 edition
  • Elvis spiritual crisis started in 1964, led him to meditate with Larry Geller, his then recent hairstylist. Elvis was always a dedicated Christian, with the book "The Prophet" being an inspiration as far as incarnation and following the death of his mother. His family and most of his friends rejected this spiritual quest. He was insulated form the world, so it must have been very frustrated that very few in his circle agreed with this part of his life. He was always very generous, from his infancy, but in time became more and more so, to the point of being extremely magnanimous. In 1965, he started becoming more involved with his spirituality, with yoga, and healing.
    • Gary Tillery, commenting on his spiritual-geared biography of Elvis Presley, "The Seeker King".
  • I had taken my song "Dreamy Eyes" to George Klein, Memphis DJ and Elvis friend and said to George: "I can really hear Elvis singing this song," because I felt Priscilla had the prettiest eyes I'd ever seen. About eight months later I got a call that Elvis had recorded one of my songs, and I assumed that it was "Dreamy Eyes," but it turned out to be "It Keeps Right On a Hurtin." When Elvis was in Germany getting ready to work, he was listening to Country Music and heard my song, and he wanted to record it. That's the way Elvis picked his music, when he heard something that he liked, he recorded it. Elvis put his song in one of his albums "From Elvis In Memphis", and I couldn't have been more thrilled and proud, because Elvis was my idol.
  • Are you kiddin̠g? I am not gonna do an Elvis song, not at the White House̜. No one can outsing the King.
    • Justin Timberlake's response to several entertainers, many from Memphis and some of whom had had important work at Stax. Thad gathered at the White House at the invitation of President Obama, who was heralding the Memphis sound, so he was asked to sing an Elvis song, as told by Justin's mother Lynn (Bomar) Harless, to George Klein on November 21, 2012
  • i) A double voice that alternates between a high quaver, reminiscent of Johnnie Ray at his fiercest, and a rich basso that might be smooth if it were not for its spasmodic delivery. 'Heartbreak Hotel', yelps the high voice, is where he's going to get away from it all. Answers the basso: 'he'll be sorry ii) Without preamble, the three-piece band cuts loose. In the spotlight, the lanky singer flails furious rhythms on his guitar, every now and then breaking a string; in a pivoting stance, his hips swing sensuously from side to side and his entire body takes on a frantic quiver, as if he had swallowed a jackhammer; his loud baritone goes raw and whining in the high notes, but down low it is rich and round. As he throws himself into one of his specialties— "Blue Suede Shoes" or "Long Tall Sally", his throat seems full of desperate aspirates or hiccuping glottis strokes, but his movements suggest, in a word, sex.
    • i) Time magazine's review of an early 1956 concert and entitled "Teeners' hero", as published on its May 14,1956 ii) and April 02, 1956 issue.
  • Elvis Presley, the 21-year-old bobby-soxers' delight, shot the Ed Sullivan Show's rating up to 43.7—highest in two years. Actor Charles Laughton, his glib tongue in his dumpling cheek, introduced Elvis with: "Ed insisted I give a high tone to the proceedings," then, to the frenzied shrieks of the teenagers, let Hillbilly Presley take over. Crooner Presley, sideburns dripping with sweat and goose grease, mumbled through three songs, gave his guitar a thorough clouting, contorted his mouth suggestively and his pelvis more so. When it was over, parents and critics, as usual, did a lot of futile grumbling at the vulgarity of this strange new phenomenon that must somehow be reckoned with.
    • Time magazine's review of Elvis first appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show, where they purposely fail to both register the ̈82.6 percentage share, the highest in history, as well as the 60,710,000 viewers, also the highest, let alone their mentioning that the 43.7 rating was not just the highest in two years, but the highest ever, as published in their September 24,1956 edition.
  • I've got a cutout of Elvis Presley outside my door so people at the US Capitol can find my office. Right now, he's wearing a big pennant that says ‘Go Golden Knights,
    • US Congresswoman for Nevada (D), Dina Titus in an article published on June 5, 2018 by Channel 3, Las Vegas, and entitled "Connect to Congress: Titus looks past primary, gives Democrats a message
  • Elvis Presley was also known for his work on the big screen. The “Heartbreak Hotel” singer made his debut in 1956's Civil War film “Love Me Tender“. It was a stunning one, and it helped propel him to the top ten of the box office for a decade in movies like "Jailhouse Rock“ and “King Creole" Eventually, he would return to music entirely after Hollywood stopped giving him challenging film roles but by then, he'd proven that he could tackle everything."
    • Aramide Tinubu, Chief Editor of Hollywood naming her list of fifteen singers who best made the transition to the big screen, in an article published by the Cheat Sheet on July 2, 2018.
  • What's the difference between Elvis and a smart politician? Elvis has been sighted.
    • Comedian Alan Todd, in an article containing numerous jests of a governmental and public nature and entitled "Dusting off the political jokes" and published on the Ouray County Plaindealer's January 18, 2019 edition.
  • Elvis Presley. I'm not sure if he's "of the "moment" but now and then there is a new release of his music.
    • Actor Alex Toohey, answering who is his favourite musician at the moment in an interview with the Isle of Man Today's April 28, 2018 edition
  • While Elvis was primarily perceived as a baritone and most of the tessitura of his songs was on that key, he was, in my opinion, a tenor. Technically, he never properly worked to smooth his passagio and bring more weight up to the top of his voice. However, one has only to look and listen to much of what Elvis sang, and recorded – especially from about 1974 onward – to realize that, had he gone in an entirely different direction musically, he could very well have sung opera. Although in bad physical condition toward the end of his life, the in concert recordings from his last tour reveal, rather hauntingly, what might have been. Listen especially to the way he sang the Timi Yuro classic "Hurt." Vocally, he was incredibly exciting.
    • The Top Ten lists, in an article entitled the Top male tenors.
  • I was shocked to hear that a man of integrity like Hal Wallis had referred to Presley as a great dramatic actor. It just shows how far a man will go for the almighty dollar. —
    • Mel Torme, as published on the June 14, 1956 edition in The Arizona Republic.
  • Listening to these songs today, their most remarkable feature is Presley's voice itself. He takes the Platters' Tony Williams's techniques, and any other predecessor's, to new, uncharted pinnacles. For a singer who was only just encountering widespread popularity, his singing resonates with amazing fortitude and confidence, especially on "Heartbreak Hotel," (1956), where Presley alternately shouts words with full lungs, then gulps the following back, as if under water but without missing a beat. In "Loving you" (1957), Presley's baritone on this, the ultimate slow dance number, is almost too powerful, virtually rumbling the floor...
    • David N. Townsend, in his essay "Changing the World: Rock 'n' Roll's Culture and Ideology".
  • i) Making their second appearance at Worthy Farm, Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey delighted the crowds as the sun set on the final day of Glastonbury 2015 by performing a number of hits from across their career. They also referenced Kanye West's claim during his own headline slot the night before that he was "the greatest living rockstar on the planet", with Townsend and then Roger Daltrey saying, "We're gonna send you home now with a rebellious 'who's the biggest fucking rockstar in the world?'It must be Elvis Presley. ii) We have to focus on his early work, and just one or two of his movies, and elements of his TV shows, to keep his memory pure. People now know that Elvis could play a mean rhythm guitar himself, and needed no other musicians to perform a great song. But Elvis was not just a rock star, he was an all-round entertainer.
    • i) Excerpted from an article quoting Pete Townsend, of The Who, as he and Roger Daltrey were quick to make light of Kanye's antics the previous night, reminding everyone that Elvis Presley was still the King of Rock – despite what Mr West may have said, and as published on Digital Spy on June 29, 2015. ii) as noted in theelevisexpress
  • My first political act was to get kicked out of class for arguing with a teacher for criticizing Elvis
    • Carol Tracy, Executive Director of the Women's Law project since 1990, in an article published by the Daily Philadephian on October 16, 2017
  • Before I made my first record, we had a three night tour of an Army base in Freidberg, Germany. I was told: “Jackie, there’s someone I’d like you to meet". So I walked in through the front door of a house in Bad Neuheim, off-base, to find Elvis himself smiling at me. I nearly fainted! We sang together, talked plenty, and I kinda fell in love with him...
    • Jackie Trent, English singer-songwriter and actress, in her autobiography, "Being me", published at the Sunday Express on 14 October, 2017
  • I mean Elvis made us move, instead of standing mute he raised our voice. And when we heard ourselves something was changing, you know, like for the first time we made a collective decision about choices, America hurriedly made Pat Boone a general, in the army they wanted us to join, But most of us held fast to Elvis and the commandants around him Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly, Little Richard, Bo Diddley, Gene Vincent, you know, like a different Civil War all over again. Man, like he woke us up, and now they're trying to put us back to sleep. So we'll see how it goes, Aayway, look at the record, man, Rock ’n’ roll is based on revolutions, going way past 33⅓, you gotta understand, man, he was America's baby Boom Ché. I oughta know man, I was in his army
    • Native American author, poet, actor, musician, and political activist John Trudell's words of wisdom, as annotated in ‘Baby Boom Ché’, a song he dedicated to his idol Elvis.
  • Well I am so glad to be in Tupelo, the birthplace of Elvis Presley. I shouldn't say this, because they are going to say I am conceited, but other than the blond hair when I was growing up they all said I looked like Elvis. I always felt that it was a great compliment. And we just gave him the Medal of Freedom in the White House. We love Elvis don̪'t we̞?
    • US President Donald Trump, in his speech at T̥upelo Regional Airport, on November 26, 2018
  • It was the very first day on set and I was so nervous.Everyone was having lunch and I really didn't feel like eating because I was that nervous. So I decided to go take a nap and if I was needed on set, they would call me. I went to my trailer and the air conditioner wasn't working. I was just hysterical -- really hysterical. I thought, ‘Oh no, this isn’t happening.’ You could only imagine how hot it was. And there was no one around because everyone was having lunch. There must be an air conditioner there. I thought. All of a sudden, there was a hand stopping me. I immediately apologized without even looking up. And I was told, ‘That’s Elvis’ dressing room. You can't just go in. I'm going to have to ask if you're allowed." At that moment, I didn’t see Presley, but I was given the green light to hang out in his room. Upon entering, I immediately felt the relief of a running air conditioner and collapsed on a nearby couch. When I opened my eyes after a restful sleep, I saw Presley’s face closely staring right back at me. He was putting a cold compress on my face. He thought I must have passed out or something, He was absolutely beautiful. I mean, people with great voices are attractive to me, but this was something else. I didn’t even know what to say because I was so shocked. And then he went, ‘Don’t worry about it. I just want you to feel good. Are you hungry? Do you want something to eat? Are you thirsty?’ I couldn't even talk!” I was overwhelmed by everything I was experiencing. He smelled like baby powder and milk. But he just kept insisting if I needed or wanted anything. Elvis also had told me I could stay for as long as I liked and not to worry about it. After he left, I eventually got up and stepped outside where I saw Presley surrounded by his entourage. At the time, he was fascinated by martial arts and when I told him I knew Bruce Lee, then that was another reason we bonded easily.He was a Southern Baptist and my family was very Christian, so we had already connected from that alone. He was very spiritual. I remember the last time we spoke, we were hanging out in his trailer. He just looked at me and said, ‘Keep that light burning baby.’ And that was it. I guess he lost his light. Couldn't find his way home, you know? I truly feel he just worked himself to death. It was very tragic.”
    • Irene Tsu, Chinese American actress who co-starred with Elvis in Paradise Hawaiian Style, as noted in her autobiography, "A Water Color Dream: The Many Lives of Irene Tsu".
  • It really puts perspective on things, though, doesn't it?
    • Words spoken by fictional character Nigel Tufnel to his bandmate, David St. Hubbins as they both face Elvis' grave in the 1984 movie "This is Spinal Tap"
  • Even as we focus on perhaps the final election of the 2018 season in North Carolina's 9th District, pundits and scholars are already debating whether or not there was a “blue wave” during the 2018 election, or if it was an Elvis Presley-like “Blue Christmas” for the Democrats, a missed opportunity for the party.
    • John A. Tures for The Observer in an article entitled "Did a Blue Wave Become a Blue Christmas for Democrats?" as published on their 12/26/2018 edition.
  • Well, this was during the time that Elvis Presley was driving a gravel truck and we were playing on 11th Street and they didn't allow whites there. It was a whole black street. And at that time I didn't know who Elvis was, whether he was a musician, he was just a guy that I liked. He liked music, so I liked him because he liked music. I'm assuming that was it and we had some form of rapport together. So I would slip him into the back of the club, the piano sitting like this and the back door was sitting there and I would sit him and have him behind the piano, because in those days I would stand up to play the piano, and I'd play the piano backwards and just clowning with the piano. But I never knew that this guy was even an entertainer. But meantime, I'm just assuming a year or so, I hear this "Blue Suede Shoes" but I never put this with this guy at all. I don't even connect the two. And many years later, in Las Vegas, I was playing the lounge room at the International Hotel, and Elvis was in the main room, but you know I never was interested in other acts, you know, I always was interested, like if I get to know you, OK, but for me to go over there, Red Foxx was in the lounge also at that time. And one night, I won some thousand dollars, and I was coming down through the back, had all this big old rack of chips and stuff and this white guy says, "Hey you don't remember me?" And I said no. So that's when he [Elvis] told me that he was the one that used to come to West Memphis and hide behind the piano, in this black club. You know, it was amazing, you know?
    • Ike Turner, in an interview with Open vault, from WGBH, trying to say that as far as the Las Vegas encounter is concerned, that this was the ice-breaker for him to become reacquainted as a friend with Elvis, after all those years.
  • The pace could be brutal between touring and schedules, but Vegas was best. The Turners' annual stays at the International, later the Hilton, allowed them to bring the kids along, sometimes taking all four of them to the big room to catch Elvis' extravaganza and he would have the whole family stand for a round of applause.
    • Tina Turner, in her autobiography "I Tina: My life story Tina Turner", written with Kurt Loder
  • So I picked up the two Guralnick biographies and started reading them, and as you do if you're reading books about music, you start listening to the tracks as you're going along. Before I'd finished the first book I became a diehard Elvis fan, and by the time I'd finished the second one I had an Elvis tattoo. He might not have written his own songs, but he was the master producer and engineer of his generation. It's also popular opinion to say that the original Hound Dog is better, but no it fucking isn't. That's just bollocks. Elvis' version of that song is lightyears ahead, and if you listen to the two of them back-to-back you can hear what he was doing. This was obviously the ‘50s so it was all cut live, and he’d stand in the middle of the room with all the musicians around him and they’d do 60 takes in a row. He’d be like, ‘Bar three, verse two; drop that F sharp to an E. Now let’s do it again.’ He was in full control of his vision. It's taken me until my mid-30s to realise it, and when I was younger I didn't really get it.
    • Frank Turner English folk singer-songwriter from Meonstoke, who began his career as the vocalist of post-hardcore band Million Dead, in an interview to Rock Icon-s Matt Stocks, and published in their online edition on 1 September 2016.
  • You want me to describe Elvis? Wow!!
  • But even the power of organized religion paled beside the personal changes I felt come over me in the mid-1950s when I heard Elvis Presley's "Mystery Train" on the radio for the first time. Determined to get a berth of my own on the fast-moving train of rock 'n' roll, I quickly made my way up to Memphis and the legendary Sun Studios. There, I talked producer Sam Phillips into giving me a shot at making some records of his own.
  • This is the best way to hear Elvis the Superstar, with "Hound Dog," (1956),"All Shook Up,(1957), "Are You Lonesome Tonight" (1960), and the ever zany "Suspicious Minds" (1969), still sounding fresh and immediate —impressive given how many times most the world has heard them —, and showing off the diversity of Elvis' singing, from the purity of his gospel falsetto to his rock and roll purr.
    • Josh Tyrangiel, reviewing "Elvis 30 Number One hits", for TIME magazine`s "The All Time best 100 albums", as published in its November 13, 2006 edition.
  • I'd really love to bump Elvis
    • Bill Tyre, Executive Director and curator of Chicago's John J. Glessner House, expressing his wish for the Glessner House and Museum to displace Graceland from the top spot in the 2018's USA Annual Holiday Poll
  • Blue laws began in Texas in 1863 and were still being passed in 1961. Many states prohibited the selling of alcoholic beverages on and off premises in one form or another on Sundays, or at restricted times. Also, blue laws of Texas did not prohibit most businesses being open on Sundays, but all of the restrictions made it impractical to open.Can anyone imagine when some Sunday shopping was a crime?If this blue law was still in effect today,we would all go to jail and cause a Jailhouse Rock with an 8.6 magnitude on the musical Richter scale like Elvis did back in his heyday.
    • African American columnist Chris Tyson, as published in an article entitled "Never on Sundays", and published in the Huntsville Item, on 24 September 2016.

U[edit]

  • It has something for everyone, except perhaps Irving Berlin, who attempted to get Elvis's recording of "White Christmas"banned from radio play, deeming it "vulgar and disrespectful". And it was, which is part of the reason why the drastically rearranged tune is so memorable, as the then-young singer masticated the contemporary classic, adding his idiosyncratic dynamics and trills (the so-called educated yodels of one's vocal chords); equally irreverent and just as riveting is the King's gritty take on Leiber and Stoller's "Santa Claus Is Back in Town", one of the most sexually suggestive holiday tunes ever, and his rollicking "Here Comes Santa Claus". And who can forget the song that changed the hue of Yuletide, "Blue Christmas", or his wistful, definitive version of "I'll Be Home for Christmas", which cemented his reputation as pop's top dreamboat. Along with Phil Spector's "Christmas Gift for You", this is arguably the finest Rock & Roll Christmas album of all-time, a seasonal yet essential recording belonging under any Christmas tree.
    • Jaan Uhelszki and Bill Holdship, reviewing "Elvis Christmas Album (1957 version), for AMAZON.COM
  • Elvis was one of the prime architects of rock and roll music. As such, he influenced several generations both musically and socially. The urgency in Presley's voice is just one part of the equation, and the ease with which he swings tells the rest of the story. Equal parts balladeer and rockabilly king, Elvis played both sides of the fence. He was both tender-love-man and hard-hitting rebel. As this collection proves, his genius was in the way he made it work.
    • UK Channel 4's review of "Elvis Golden Record, Volume II"
  • It is not enough to reject the capitalist decadence with words, to speak out against the ecstatic singing of someone like Elvis Presley. We have to offer something better...
    • Walter Ulbricht, East German Communist Party leader, in a speech delivered at a cultural conference in April of 1959, and as published by EIN's online page on October 20, 2012.
  • The course examines the history of rock music, primarily as it unfolded in the United States, from the days before rock (pre-1955), to the end of the 1960s. It covers the music of Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, Phil Spector, Bob Dylan, the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and many more artists, with an emphasis both on cultural context and on the music itself. The course will also explore how developments in the music business and in technology helped shape the ways in which styles developed.
    • The University of Rochester's description of Part I of their 2018 online course on the history of rock music, as noted in The Indian Express' December 26 2018 edition and in an article entitled ̊"From dog psychology to history of rock music, these offbeat online courses were a hit in 2018̊
  • Elvis Presley, for example, became a key supporter of Father Don Mowery's work, having grown up in Lauderdale Courts, one of the many Memphis housing projects well served by Youth Service during this period. Interestingly, Elvis' donations always came with a catch, namely that they never be put into the general-operating fund, but instead set aside for “special projects.” By 1985, Memphis-style programs were operating in dozens of cities all across America, father Mowery's concept generally considered the most innovative social-service effort developed between the military and civilian sectors in the late-twentieth century. And although no one knew at that time how much of an impact Elvis' contributions would have on the future of the organization, much of the funding for this national expansion came precisely from that “special projects” fund that Elvis Presley had supported in the 1960s.
    • Excerpted from an article on the life and times of Father Don Mowery, the founder of Youth Service, USA, written by Darrell Userton, published on Memphis Magazine on May 1, 2015.
  • Society is always on the lookout for a cultural target for finger pointing when the establishment has issues, especially generationally with its youth. In the '50s, comic books became the easiest target to blame for the post-World War II rise of juvenile delinquency in America because certainly, society never believes anything is the fault of the establishment, itself, nor its parents, teachers, clergyman, politicians, etc. So in the early '50s, comic books were mounted on the cultural crucifix. To this day, I believe that the comic books as we know them would not have survived that attack had it not been for the emergence of Elvis Presley. Quickly, the finger turned and pointed at him, instead. Of course, this was followed by 45 RPM record burnings in cities across our nation. Over the decades, that witch-hunt of blame has moved from comic books to Elvis Presley to Saturday morning cartoons to rap to hip-hop to video games, because, again, nothing is ever the fault of society, itself....
    • Michael E. Uslam, American producer of the Batman films, in an article defending Stan Lee̪'s contributions after an attack on his legacy by Bill Maher, as published at the HollywoodReporter on November 20, 2018

V[edit]

  • I know he didn't write songs but, to me, Elvis Presley was the complete artist. His voice, his song choice, his energy and attitude, his perfect hair and clothes: it felt like he'd been sent from another planet. It was incomprehensible to me that this was a man who made mistakes, or who felt sadness or loneliness. I recently visited his childhood home in Tupelo, Mississippi and it was in stark contrast to the life I'd imagined. To a child, he seemed invincible – and he made me feel it too. To watch Elvis and to listen to his songs was pure escapism and aspiration. "Blue Suede Shoes" was my first love. From as early as I can remember, I knew that if I could channel some of that raw power I saw in him, life would be better for it. I guess, like all of us, he was flawed as a man, but he was the perfect entertainer."
  • UK singer, songwriter and guitarist Justin Young, frontman for The Vaccines, choosing his favorite musician of all time in an article published in the Guardian and entitled "Elvis Presley's power, Tina Turner's legs: musicians pick their biggest influences", as published on March 1, 2018.
  • That's what rock'n'roll, born of blues and country music, channeled through charming, southern Christian men like Little Richard and Elvis Presley, has always done for us.
    • Siva Vaidhyanathan's review for the Guardian of the movie "Blinded by the light", about an Indian youngster influenced by the music of Bruce Springsteen, as published in their August 15, 2019 edition.
  • Elvis Presley? He is the greatest rock & roller.
    • Hilton Valentine, guitarrist for the Animals' answer when asked to provide a one-sentence impression of several important musicians, as noted in an article published by Forbes magazine' October 27, 2020 edtiuon and entitled "Why Did The 60s Group The Animals Break Up At The Height Of Its Popularity?
  • I was really happy about his success, because acceptance wasn't really too great in those days unless you were a schooled singer, so it opened up a whole new thing for young performers who had not studied voice but just had feel. It made me a little sad to think that here was a man who came along and probably made one of the greatest contributions to rock n roll music ever, and people would come in and criticise his shows, (In fact), for someone to have given that much joy to that many people, he shouldn't of had to do anything but walk out on that stage and just stand there. And I sometimes wonder if people in that sense are sadistic and wait to see you fall or hope to see you fall.
    • Frankie Valli's comments to reporter Heather Bernard at News Center 4,, and as broadcast on August 17, 1977.
  • The only time I met was in Las Vegas, at night, but what a time that was!!!
    • Mamie Van Doren, recounting her only encounter with Elvis, in an article published on Closer Weekly's April 5, 2020 edition
  • When I was a very little girl, my aunt told me never to listen to Elvis Presley’s music. She asserted (forcefully, I might add) how Elvis (supposedly) said, “The only thing Negroes can do for me is buy my records and shine my shoes.” My aunt also declared he stole black music, so, I now ask myself, why would an African American woman defend a white man she was raised to hate? I decided on a full study and complete unmasking of falsely reported news surrounding the life and career of Elvis Presley. The truth about the invented slur lies in white liberals owning media outlets like Sepia, magazine where they could make money exploiting statements and falsifying others because so many whites during the era openly made stupid remarks against black people. So when a black radio station decided to play Elvis' music and black people started acknowledging that they listened to and bought Elvis' records, white liberals went into panic mode and the slur was invented.
    • Joyce Rochelle Vaughn, African American writer, explaining how the matter of Elvis being a racist came about, as noted in the preface of her book "Thirty Pieces of Silver: The Betrayal of Elvis Presley" Justice Payne Publishing, USA, 2016 (713 pages, Illustrated, ISBN 978-0-9982708-1-4).
  • Pope Francis sends me his personal CDs, classical but also tango, Elvis and Piaf...
    • Gian Guiodo Vecci, top columnist for Italy's Corriere della Sera,in an article published on January 13, 2022.
  • There was a time when the B-side might save you. You put all that effort into making records and then not to give people an A-side and a B-side, I loved that. I used to go into someplace in Fargo and put the nickel in the jukebox, listen to Elvis on the jukebox for 4 days and then flip the record over. A lot of my stuff was B-sides and I was glad to have them. They paid the same as the A-side.
    • Bobby Vee, in an interview with Craig Moore, of Goldmine, as published on May 14, 2009
  • I listen to Elvis Presley, Chainsmokers, Miranda Lambert, Kendrick Lamar, Taylor Swift and Royal Blood.
    • Abhisit Vejjajiva, the 27th Prime Minister of Thailand, on his favourite musicians, as published on BKO on May 20, 2018.
  • - My earliest connection with Elvis was that my substitute English teacher at Paxton High was Mae Axton, who seven months later would go on to write "Heartbreak Hotel". Mae was also a show promoter and in the late spring of 1955 she brought the Hank Snow Show to the Gator Bowl Baseball Stadium and that was how I met Elvis. Before the start of the show, I got backstage, talked to him for a long time and then I finally introduced myself to him. He then said "Well I'm Elvis Presley" and I thought 'Wow, that's a strange name' as I had never even heard his name before that. I was there actually to see Snow who headlined and so forth, but as soon as he hit the stage I knew who he was! I'd been thinking that he was just a guitar player but when he went out on stage they came out of the bleachers, pushed so hard you just couldn't hold them back. There just wasn't enough protection as this was a Country show. Elvis was bottom of the bill that day and he hadn't even had a major hit yet, so you wonder what Snow must have thought of the reaction. That day, on May 13, 1955, was the first time I had ever seen a show with so much screaming and fan input. I'd never seen anything like that. It was unbelievable.
    • Singer and Rock memorabilia collector Jimmy Velvet, recalling the day when he met the then 20 year old Elvis Presley before the start of his May 13, 1955 show at the Gator Bowl Baseball Park in Jacksonville Florida, a concert known as being the first Elvis riot of its kind, with some 7,000 people rushing the stage.
  • Especially in the South, they speak about Elvis and Jesus in the same breath.
  • The one thing that I envy is Bill Belew having the job of dressing Elvis Presley. That job I would've liked'.
    • Fashion designer Gianni Versace, as first reported by Esquire magazine, in an interview with Bill Belew in 2016.
  • Not only are we thrilled to take viewers into one of America's most beloved private residences, home of the late, great Elvis Presley, we are also thrilled to put the soundtrack of his legendary career behind our romantic holiday movie.
    • Michelle Vicary, Executive VP of Hallmark in announcing country singer Kellie Pickler's 2018 Xmas movie, as published in SoundslikeNashville on May 25, 2018.
  • While I was recuperating at Veterans' Hospital in Portsmouth, VA, I went to nearby Norfolk, where I first saw an up and coming singer named Elvis Presley perform at Hank Snow's All Star Jamboree. This experience changed my life. Seeing him on television, as well, I practically launched out of the hospital bed and onto the stage...
    • Singer Gene Vincent, from the archives of the Rockabilly Legends.
  • After seeing "Jailhouse Rock", where Elvis gets out of jail and makes his own records, takes them to the radio stations himself to finally put his records in the stores, I then made records and put them in stores.
    • Singer Bobby Vinton as noted in brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/b/bobbyvinto241039.html?src=t_elvis_presley
  • Wide raging voices̠ː Singers with extensions from B1 to A5. Elvis Presley's B1 may be heard on the song "Such a Night" and on "Mystery Train" an A5 is reached towards the end. Later in his career, he developed a rich baritone voice which still mastered the higher register with immense power, such as on "American Trilogy", "Unchained Melody" or the joking "Little Darlin"
    • Chapter on Vocal Music as noted in Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  • He arrived early to my home, the revolutionary. And I always referred to him to understand the difference between wjhat is folfclore and what vis the business of rock music. He influenced singers in every country in the world
    • Colombian musician Carlos Vives for Gibson guitars, in a youtube video issued 13 July 2022.
  • I asked him how he felt about Estes Kefauver and Adlai Stevenson from the Democratic National Convention, and about the Andrea Doria disaster, the Empire waistline in the world of fashion, and Pablo Casals, the world's greatest cellist. His answer was that he would rather keep his views to himself because he did not want to be labeled, so I left him alone. Later I found out that Elvis always enjoyed telling the story of how he managed to outsmart me and every other reporter by answering questions without really answering them.
    • Luther Voltz Jr, who interviewed Elvis for the Miami Herald on August 6, 1956. Had the interview taken place eight months later, Elvis could have at least spoken hours about the Andrea Doria, knowing as well as he did, as of April of 1957, one of the survivors, songwriter Mike Stoller.
  • Long before the plans for an actual rock museum in Cleveland were hatched, a group headed by Rolling Stone's Jann Wenner and Atlantic Records' Ahmet Ertegun started off the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with two induction ceremonies-cum-concerts, in 1986 and 1987, bringing in a total of 25 blues-and-rock groundbreakers primarily from the ‘50s, including Chuck Berry, Little Richard and Elvis Presley. Presley is in fact rock’s greatest presence, shaking a country with a single-handed nuclear reaction of country, gospel, and the blues. Along with the Beatles, he is the epitome of pop stardom as well.
    • Vulture magazine's laud of Elvis, who they ranked amongst the top 5 Rock and Roll hall of Famers of all time, as published on their January 12, 2019 edition
  • Any young man who calls his mother “baby” and speaks baby-talk with her must love her tenderly. But Elvis Presley didn't just love his mother – he worshiped her. In return, she inspired him to create a sound that would change popular music forever. It was Gladys who gave her son his first guitar for his 11th birthday, even though Elvis had preferred a bicycle. And it was his love for Gladys that prompted him to record his first song, My Happiness as a special birthday gift for her. The spiritual bond between mother and son had existed from the minute Elvis was born. On 8 January 1935 the then 22-year-old Gladys suffered a hemorrhage and barely survived giving birth to a set of twins. The first one, Jesse Garon, was stillborn, which led Gladys to believe that the surviving twin, Elvis Aaron, had inherited Jesse's soul. Elvis, she believed, was “the One”. Throughout his childhood she instilled in him how special he was. So when the studio receptionist at Sun Records asked Elvis what kind of singer he was, the 18-year-old answered, “I don’t sound like nobody.” The belief in her only son's special calling, whatever that would turn out to be, made Gladys very protective of Elvis. Over the objections of her husband, Vernon, she made sure he never spent a night away from home until he was 17. Once Elvis's musical career took off in a big way in 1956 things went south for his muse. Then, in 1958, when Elvis was drafted into the Army, she succumbed to a heart attack. After her death Elvis remained an incredibly successful artist. In 1977, at the age of 42, he died from an overdose of medications at Graceland. The date was 16 August – the very same day he had buried his beloved mother 19 years earlier and inconsolably wept, “Oh, God, everything I have is gone.”
    • Jenny Volvovski, Julia Rothman and Matt Lamothe, for the Telegraph in an article entitled "Behind every great man.....The women who made Elvis, Warhol and Nabokov great", as published on their 26 Oct 2014 edition.

W[edit]

  • He is the Elvis of Sea ice Science
    • About Peter Wadham, as noted in Greenpeace 's July 2010 edition.
  • It was my mother's Elvis concerts from the 70's on VHS tapes that first drew me to the sheer thrill of an all-you-can-eat live performance. I just had this fascination for him. I was going to the Punters Club in Fitzroy but a lot of the bands I was watching were staring at their shoes, I mean shoe gaze was massive. Then I'd go home to my mothers's Elvis' tapes and nobody was owning a spotlight like that, nobody. I wanted to start a band that was putting on show. I wanted to reward people for leaving their living rooms if they were going to come out to watch a band, let's give them something visual as well as a band that sounds good.
    • Henry Wagons, Australian singer/songwriter and frontman of the outlaw country rock band, Wagons, recalling what inspired him to become a rocker, in an article published by the Brisbane Times on February 8, 2018.
  • I think about Elvis all the time.
  • I loved everything about him.I grew up with singers, dancers and comics. At 15, I discovered Elvis Presley. A girl whom I wanted to take to the prom showed me a magazine clipping of her "boyfriend." It was Elvis. This guy looked like a Greek god, and then I saw him on television. I loved everything about him, so I became a fan. I always wanted to stand in the same place he stood the night he caused all the commotion at the Ed Sullivan Theatre. May I?
    • Oscar winner Christopher Walken, in an article entitled The Religious Affiliation of Christopher Walken, as published in Adherents.com and a couple of years later, explaining to Dave Letterman the reasons why he wrote "Him", a play about Elvis.
  • In fact, I first provided clothing for her during her first pregnancy in 1981, and continued to do so until her death in 1997. One such outfit, which Diana herself called her ‘Elvis Dress’, was worn by her both to the British Fashion Awards in October 1989 and then on an official visit to Hong Kong. The year of her passing away, the dress was bought for £81,203 at a benefit auction by The Franklin Mint, a company which produces memorabilia such as a portrait doll featuring her wearing this dress, thus making it one of the best-known of Diana's many outfits, and the second highest prized. The Mint returned the dress to the Diana Estate a few years later.
    • Designer Catherine Walker, describing the white silk strapless dress encrusted with pearls and sequins with a matching bolero jacket, which she designed with Elvis specifically in mind,as commissioned by Diana, the then Princess of Wales, and as noted in V&A Search the Collections online page.
  • I had a 45 rpm record player, one of those that accommodated little records with big holes in the middle and with the capacity to hold, what, 10 or so records, to drop down one at a time, until all 10 had played. But that's too general for what I've been thinking about. Specifically, it's one of the songs, really the only song I can say with certainty that I played, over and over and over again. “Lavender Blue” by Sammy Turner. And it, and others, made me know I loved music — most all kinds excusing jazz and opera. And then, it was Elvis. Controversial Elvis Presley. Would my folks let me listen to his music or watch him on our little black and white television? Then, before we knew it, Elvis was too big to be avoided or ignored. You had to watch him...
    • Larry Walker, in an article for the Telegraph entitled "Just another silly love song", and published on Nov. 5, 2016.
  • i) One day we are in a recording session, here at RCA B, and he was talking to one of the clean up guys. Then three RCA people from New York, with suits and they walked up to Elvis, but he paid no attention to them. The clean up guy stopped talking, but Elvis said "Go ahead, Sir". When he finished, the clean up guy shook his hand and thanked Elvis for talking to him. Then Elvis approached the guys from New York and said "Gentlemen, if you see me talking to somebody, don't interrupt me, don't even walk up to me, I know when it{s your turn and I will walk up to you. And that was the end of it. ii) The best I have ever seen him look was in 1967, at the Circle G Ranch. His hair was black to blonde like it was naturally, the colour of a fawn. Just as shiny as could be. He had a suit and shoes the same color of his hair, so he walked in and we were stunned. He had been out riding his horses, was tanned and his eyes shunned like diamonds. We couldn't believe it. We just stood there and looked at him. Finally, he said "Shall we dance?"
    • Singer Ray Walker of the Jordainaires, who backed him from 1956 onwards, i) in an interview in 2016, and ii) as published in the book, Elvis from those who knew him best.
  • In constructing his own public image during the early 1950s, Elvis unconsciously appropriated, synthesised and ultimately capitalised upon images from a series of contemporary cultural icons. These ranged from Captain Marvel and Dean Martin to Jackie Wilson. ‘Cultural production’, states Madow, ‘is always (and necessarily) a matter of reworking, recombining, and redeploying already existing symbolic forms, sounds,narratives, and images’.To this effect – on the current standing of US publicity rights law – one could actually begin to question Elvis's right to call the Elvis image his own in the first place; however, few would deny that the Elvis whole was definitely greater than the sum of its parts. The overall effect of his efforts was to create a unique image which had a fresh and vital meaning in post-war society. If there did not exist any rights of control ove power of the creation of cultural symbols then there would be little financial incentive for individuals to spend the time, energy and resources to develop their ‘talents and produce works which ultimately benefit society as a whole Elvis signs and their multiple meanings are so strong that Elvis has, in effect, mediated his own celebrity culture beyond the grave.
    • David S. Wall UK Professor of Criminology at the Centre for Criminal Justice Studies, School of Law, University of Leeds, in his article "Policing Elvis: Legal Action and the Shaping of Post-Mortem Celebrity Culture as Contested Space" as published in Research Gate Nets' September 2003 edition.
  • We have to still care about Elvis because if we don't, then we don't like music. He was the big bang, the sun around which all the other planets circled ever since and when he went down, we lost the first and the best.
    • Mick Wall, UK writer, in the film The Day The Rock Star Died which premiered on October 16, 2018 AXS TV
  • Basically, Elvis Presley was doing self-defense techniques because he couldn't spar, it was simply too dangerous. He had to preserve his voice, so contact to the face or neck was out. He also didn't want to risk breaking any bones, so he'd just train on and demonstrate self-defense moves like taking full-power shots to the stomach. He was a fine athlete, not a fighter, but that doesn't mean he wasn't able to fight, though. His technique —his side kick and his punches— looked as good as anybody else's. He wanted to do karate because he'd learned a bit of it in the Army and really liked it. The best part of working with him was beating up all of his people, like Red and Sonny West, Jerry Shilling and all the others. I just relegated them to pulp.
    • US kickboxing Champion Bill Wallace, in an article published in Black Belt magazine on March 20, 2011.
  • Well, now wait.You say he has no talent and yet I think that you'll agree that he has been taken into the bosom of America in a certain sense and has been very well paid for it...
    • Mike Wallace, defending Elvis in an interview broadcast on November 16, 1957, with syndicated gossip columnist Elsa Maxwell, who seconds before had labelled Elvis as a "young, no talented, utterly unattractive man with a horrible face and with that lank hair that falls down driving young women all over the country in some sort of ecstasy"
  • With the way he was marketed, he didn't even need to be able to sing the way he could. But Elvis had talent, plain and simple. The guy had a thousandth-octave range, and a variety in his vocal styles and approach, he could make more vocal tones, with just his voice, than a guitar player with 50 pedals and gadgets. If you never even saw the guy, you could plain feel, not just hear, the emotion and passion in his voice, and you are immediately taken in, one hundred percent. On the merit of vocals alone, he had more talent in the barbecue stuck in his teeth than the singers who sell millions of records do today.
    • Country singer Roger Wallace, in the web`s "Soapbox"
  • A Presley motion picture is the only sure thing in Hollywood.”
    • Hal Wallis, Producer of nine of Elvis' films, as published in www.graceland.com
  • This is something I've always wanted to do: Take an evening, invite an audience and just be me. What you can expect is me playing music, answering almost all questions anyone would ask (except the ones that may incriminate me), a big screen power point presentation put together and narrated by me, guitar shop talk, slide guitar 101, true stories of road craziness, playing more music and I’m particularly excited to talk about my Elvis experiences —what he meant to me and what I meant to him. We’ll conclude with a Town Hall Meeting, including a strategy and platform discussion for my candidacy to run for President of the United States in 2020 and sing ‘God Bless America’ or something else (Elvis would want that)."
    • Joe Walsh, formerly with the James Gang, Barnstorm, Eagles, The Party Boys, and Ringo Starr & His All-Starr Bands, announcing his forthcoming appearance at the newly built Elvis Presley Guesthouse in Memphis, as published by Graceland com.
  • Is it true Elvis took you often to tour the morgue? Why̞?
    • Barbara Walters's question to Priscilla Presley during her ABC TV 1985 interview.
  • This era of biracial musical creation and consumption has been largely erased from popular memory. It lies buried beneath simplistic parables of white expropriation and exploitation of black culture in which Elvis Presley has become emblematic of centuries of uncompensated and unacknowledged white appropriation of black cultural ingenuity and labour. There is enormous moral power to this perspective and, to be sure, plenty of evidence of just such exploitation and theft. Nonetheless, it still makes for unpersuasive history and fails to help us to understand the significance of Elvis and the whole biracial rock-and-roll phenomenon that intersected with the dawn of the modern civil rights movement.
    • Brian Ward, for the Independent, in an article published on August 16, 2017.
  • Arguably the finest recording found in all the Sun sessions, "Trying To Get To You"(1955), is a song that Presley made his own due to his hugely committed vocal, and the simple carefree abandon with which he performs it; at first, it feels like a classic country song with simple, elegant lyrics; but it is at the bridge – where Elvis really lets fly –, that the song is transformed from a lovely country lament, into deep blues; although the 1955 version is magnificent, Elvis manages to better it on his "1968 Comeback Special", in which he sings the song with so much intensity, it prompted critic Greil Marcus to exclaim "this is probably the finest rock and roll ever recorded.
    • Thomas Ward's review, for AllMusicGuide.com, of "Trying To Get To You", whose original version has now been confirmed, by BMG/RCA (which owns all the Presley Sun catalogue), as having been sang and recorded by Elvis while simultaneously playing the piano, with Sun Records' Sam Philipps immediately arranging the mix so that his rather loud (and then still amateurish) piano playing could not be heard in the final master take.
  • i) I liked Dylan, the way he created a brilliant new style. I even gave him one of my silver "Double Elvis" paintings. Later on, though, I heard rumors that he had used it as a dart board up in the country. When I'd ask, ‘Why did he do that?’ I'd invariably get hearsay answers like ‘Listen to Like a Rolling Stone — I think you’re the ‘diplomat on the chrome horse, man.’. I didn't know exactly what they meant by that — I never listened much to the words of songs — but I got the tenor of what people were saying — that Dylan didn't like me ii) For forty-five minutes nonstop Ali raged on about prostitution on the steps of the White House, gravity, meteorites, jumping out of the window, Israel, Egypt, Zaire, South Africa, drugs, broken skulls, delusions, angel food cake, yellow hair, judgment day, Muslim morality, Jesus, boxing, Sweden, the Koran, friendship, and Elvis, relating it all to the central point that ‘man must obey the laws of God or perish!’”
    • Andy Warhol, i) commenting on what could have happened to the painting he gave Bob Dylan, who years later regretted having exchanged it for some furniture with his manager, Albert Grossman. Upon the latter's death, his wife sold it to the New York Museum of Modern Art for US$700,000. Still, that was small change when compared to what a similar "Double Elvis" sold for at Sotheby's in 2012, namely 37.5 million dollars, exactly fifty times what Grossman's widow got. Dylan was flabbergasted when he found out and ii) From Ali's lectures entitled Friendship and The Real Cause of Man's Distress:, 1967 and as noted in Victor Bockris in his book “The Perfect Interview: The Ali-Warhol Tapes.” Gadfly, Apr. 1999
  • Elvis Presley existed not only as a flesh-and-blood person but also as millions of pictures on album covers and movie screens, in newspapers and magazines. He was infinitely reproducible. Similarly, through use of the silkscreen printing process, Warhol could produce as many Elvis paintings as he pleased.
    • The Andy Warhol Museum's official laud on Elvis Presley as a subject of Art.
  • When we first met, I was like, 'OK, Pam, don't act a fool, but I was trying to keep my composure, because this was fricking Prince. It's like Elvis Presley or Michael Jackson. It doesn't get any higher than that."
    • Pam Warren, African American DJ also known as Pam the Funkstress and the Coup DJ, referring to his main client, Prince, in an interview in the San Francisco Chronicle in May of 2016, and as published by Billboard on her obituary, dated 23 December 2017.
  • As a single woman, I could always spot a handsome man. Elvis Presley was one of the prettiest, yes, prettiest and nicest people I ever known. Pictures and videos of him really did not do him justice. In 1969, when I opened at the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas and he had opened at the International, I once went to see my aunt Cissy Houston (a member of Elvis' vocal backing group, the Sweet Inspirations), during one of their sound checks. Elvis was there and Cissy introduced me to him. He let me know he was a a fan of my recordings then had all the Vegas record stores place a photo of him inside of my albums. This he announced from the stage and added that anyone who bought any of my albums would find an autographed photo of him inside of it. That week I think I sold more albums in Las Vegas than I ever had. I will never forget this act of kindness. We lost an icon when he made his transition.
    • Dionne Warwick, recalling the time she met Elvis, as told in her auto-biography "My Life, As I See It", (pp 99-100), published in 2010. The story also dovetails nicely with that of her then ten year companion, actor Gianni Russo's account of Elvis, in Las Vegas, watching a western being shown on television with him, then drawing his real guns to make fun of the scenes they were watching, as noted in his auto biography entitled “Hollywood Godfather: My Life in the Movies and the Mob”.
  • There would be no current popular music without Elvis. He not only synthesized everything that had come before him in a really unique way, but he influenced everybody who came after — so you can have Blake Shelton and Adam Lambert influenced by the same cat.
    • Don Was, Grammy-winning producer,in an interview with Rollingstone and published in their February 13, 2019 edition.
  • I've just worked with this guy ( in reference to Austin Butler) on stage and I've never seen a work ethic like it.
    • Denzel Washington' s advice to director and producer Baz Luhrmann, whom he didnt even know, as to who should play the lead role in the 2022 Warner Brothers production of "Elvis" as noted in a E News article entitled "How a "Cold Call" from Denzel Washington helped Austin Butler score Elvis' role, and as published on their May 12, 2022 edition.
  • i) Elvis Presley got the polio vaccine backstage on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1956, then publicized it on radio, and vulnerable teenagers flocked to follow. Today’s stars should, too. Another tool: incentives. President Joe Biden on Wednesday called on employers to give paid time off for vaccination; how about other inducements, such as bonuses?
    • The Washington Post's Editorial Board's opinion on advocacies for vaccination during the Covid 19 pandemia, as atated in an article entitled "The US has vaccimated half its adults, the problen is the other half", and published on their April 21, 2021 edition
  • Elvis' range was about two and a quarter octaves, as measured by musical notation, but his voice had an emotional range from tender whispers to sighs down to shouts, grunts, grumbles and sheer gruffness that could move the listener from calmness and surrender, to fear. His voice can not be measured in octaves, but in decibels; even that misses the problem of how to measure delicate whispers that are hardly audible at all.
    • Lindsay Waters, Executive Editor for the Humanities at Harvard University Press, in his essay "Come softly, darling, hear what I say"
  • I better watch out. I believe whitey's picking up on the things that I'm doing
    • Muddy Waters, after listening to Elvis' "Trouble" while unaware that it was written for Elvis by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoler, as noted in the book "Elvis Presley and the Politics of Popular Memory"
  • In my seventeen years as doorman to the top hotel in Hollywood, the biggest star that ever stayed there was Elvis Presley. He was indeed one of the nicest people I have ever met in my life. If I introduced any person to him, he would show the utmost courtesy and respect that they ever encountered. Sometimes, over the long years I felt that God had put him on this earth for a very special reason. When you use the phrase "a very special person", that was Elvis Presley, in my opinion.
    • Earl "The Pearl" Watson, African American doorman of the Knickerbocker Hotel from 1945 to 1962. In his bio entitled "Doorman To The Stars̊, he also talked about wanting to write an ENTIRE book dedicated to his positive memories of Elvis
  • Whereas Ottawa has the unique distinction of being just one of three cities outside of the United States where Elvis Presley had a live performance, April 3 shall henceforth be known as Elvis Presley day in the capital.
    • Jim Watson, Mayor of Ottawa, as reported by CBC News on April 3, 2017, celebrating the 60th anniversary of Elvis' two sold out Ottawa shows in the Canadian capital.
  • Keith Richards taught me rock and roll. We’d have nothing to do all day and we’d play these records over and over again. I learned to love Muddy Waters. Keith turned me on to how good Elvis Presley was, and I’d always hated Elvis up ’til then.
    • Charlie Watts, as quoted in his obituary piublished in CNBC's August 24, 2021 edition
  • Men, women and children recently released from immigration detention centers at the border are passing through the Memphis Greyhound bus station by the hundreds. At the border, they were detained for two days and then let go, ready to continue on to Virginia. After answering some questions he, and Hondurean, excused himself. "We're hungry," he said in Spanish. Then he and his son got in line with other migrants at the restaurant inside the station. Wearing a tan jacket, he counted his dollar bills and coins and tried to figure out how to order a hamburger without speaking English. His son, wearing a baseball cap, pointed him out to a postcard of Elvis Presley...
    • Michaela Watts, writing for The Commercial Appeal in an article entitled "Greyhound station becomes transit point for Central Americans" and published in that paper's 9 November 2018 edition.
  • Elvis Presley. That lit the fuse for me.
    • Jim Weatherly, Former University of Mississippi Quarter Back and songwriter, in reference to what turned him away from a career in football and into one of music, as published on the Clarion Ledger on October 12, 2018.
  • Everything is collectible, it seems, even human hair. Outbidding an international field of collectors, an unnamed Londoner paid $13,000 last week to purchase a lock of Napoleon's hair, reportedly snipped a day after the Emperor's death in 1821. For those in the know, that's a relative bargain, particularly in view of what collectors have spent on strands from another famous head, namely that of Elvis Presley, whose small jar of hair sold for $115,000 in 2002. (In fact), Presley's barber had reportedly saved his hair in a bread bag. "I have no idea what [the collector] intends to do with it," said a representative from the Chicago company, MastroNet, that held the internet auction.
    • The Week's collective answer to the question making up the headline of their article of July 6 of 2010 and entitled "Strands of glory: Is Napoleon's hair worth more than Elvis'?
  • It was seeing Elvis Presley on The Milton Berle Show, before Ed Sullivan. I already was pretty musical and seeing Elvis and his band, particularly his drummer, D.J. Fontana, just kind of grabbed me. Then, of course, four or five months later, he was on The Ed Sullivan Show and everything just... well, that was the Big Bang.
    • Max Wienberg, drummer for Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band and television personality, answering how he first got the rock and roll urge in an interview with the Jerusalem Post, as published on January 27, 2018.
  • I went to see Col. Parker with the million dollars he'd asked me to put up, which I got in two days, from an investor since I didn't have a cent to my name, so that is when he introduced me to Elvis, as his promoter. And Elvis, who was actually two years older than me just said "Thank you very much, Sir". Anyways, by the time the two week tour wound up, in San Diego, I was a millionaire, too (LOL).
    • Rock promoter and Hollywood producer Jerry Weintraub, recalling how he made his first million dollars, in an interview with Charlie Rose on Nov. 10, 1998
  • Is it 2018 and the subject is the Long Range Stand-Off Weapon (LRSO)? No, it's 1956 and the subject is the AGM-28 cruise missile. Choosing the same solution (for the same aircraft!) decades apart seems like eye-roll material, but modern drone makers can draw much inspiration from the older missile. By the mid 1950s Soviet air defenses could shoot down American bombers well before they got within bombing range of important targets, so in 1956 the Strategic Air Command (SAC) asked for a supersonic cruise missile big enough to carry an H-bomb several hundred miles, and small enough for a B-52 to carry along with its bomb load. The missile's onboard inertial navigation system let it place its 1.45-megaton W-28 warhead within two miles of its target at six-hundred-miles range. It ran like a scalded dog and took its name from the Elvis Presley tune—the "Hound Dog". Peak deployment spanned the 1960s into the middle 1970s, with up to 29 bomber wings carrying them on patrol. But as early as 1966 Defense Secretary Robert McNamara sought to retire them, so they went to the kennels in 1975 for dead storage, and the last one (save for a few museum displays) was scrapped about a year after Elvis himself died. They lingered long enough for their whiz-bang terrain-matching guidance system to become perfected and miniaturized in America's modern cruise missile weapons as deployed in the late 1970s and 1980s. Future drone motherships are certain to adopt and adapt its close bond with its owner— the fuel, thrust, electrical and data hosted by the motherships will be essential to swarms. The Hound Dogs will shed their fleas, indeed.
  • Steve Weintz, in an article entitled "The AGM-28 'Hound Dog' Cruise Missile: How the US Air Force Planned to Drop a Hydrogen Bomb on Russia", published in the National Interest on August 18, 2018.
  • Elvis was probably the most important thing in music, maybe ever
    • Bob Weir, singer-songwriter and guitarist, founding member of the Grateful Dead, in an interview for ABC's Elvis Lives.
  • In early 1957, I flew to Hollywood to finally meet him. It was late in the day, and he had already recorded quite a few songs so, during a break in the session, I noticed him sitting alone in the corner, adlibbing some blues on the guitar. I wandered over to the piano next to him, sat down and joined in. He didn't look up, kept on playing and even changed keys on me, but I followed along. Then he looked up with that smile he was famous for, and asked who I was and what I was doing in the studio? I told him I had composed one of the songs he was about to record called 'Got A Lot O' Livin' To Do'. He immediately called out to his musicians and they recorded it on the spot. I never imagined the impact he was about to make on the world. Anyways,a couple of months later, I went to see one of the two Elvis shows he gave in Philly and the place was mobbed, girls with their feet dangling down from the balconies, everybody going crazy. I sat there and said 'This is a phenomenon! As a matter of fact while I was sitting there, a tomato went hurling through the air -Elvis was already on stage, and it hit and broke the strap on his guitar-. He stopped the show and said 'Hey,wait a minute! If somebody's got a problem up there, why don't you just come down here and we'll work it out'. Whoever threw it, would't come down from the balcony,but the person sure got bood....
    • Ben Wiseman, Music composer best known for having written more songs recorded by Elvis (fifty seven) than any other songwriter in history, recalling his attending the Philly concert on April 5,1957,as noted in an interview with EIN.
  • No one had any expectations, he being was such a strange, quiet fellow — so completely foreign, but he sang and read a scene from The Rainmaker and answered questions asked from off-screen — and it was phenomenal. It was amazing to be there, one of those life-changing experiences."
    • Screenwriter Allan Weiss, in his 2004 book "Elvis Presley: The Man. The Life. The Legend", in a specific reference to his being there with producer Hal Wallis on the day Elvis did his first screen test for Paramount, and as published on his obituary by The Hollywood Reporter on 3/27/2017
  • When you picture past presidents of the United States, whom do you see? Perhaps you envision John F. Kennedy as a doting father playing with his children in the West Wing. Maybe you remember Richard Nixon as the smiling yet stiff leader who posed hand-in-hand with Elvis Presley in the Oval Office. In the case of Barack Obama, you might recall him as the solemn-faced Commander in Chief, watching the Osama Bin Laden raid in the Situation Room, or as the first African-American president, bowing his head so that a 5-year-old black boy could compare their haircuts. Official White House photographers —the image-makers who quietly author visual archives of America's Commanders in Chief— craft these impressions, which become indelible in the public imagination.
    • Haley Weiss for Artsy, in an article entitled ̊̊How White House Photographers Have Shaped the Image of the Presiden̊t̊ and published on their January 7, 2019 edition.
  • I put Elvis Presley up there with Jolson and Sinatra, and I'll go one step further: Elvis was the greatest pop entertainer of the 20th century. Like Al Jolson, he gave his all when performing: He sang from his heart, his body, the very essence of his total being, when sharing what he felt."
    • Mort Weiss, Jazz clarinet musician, recalling his having shared a train with Presley when they were both 21 years old, as published on the February 25, 2012 online edition of Something else. at www.somethingelseviews.com
  • He played the San Diego Arena in the spring, and my family lived in nearby La Jolla, so I went to the concert. "Heartbreak Hotel" was already a radio hit, and I couldn't get enough of it. Hearing that song was a real turning point for me as a teenager. When I saw him in action, he was mesmerizing, dressed as he was in a pair of loose trousers, loafers, a shirt and open jacket. When he moved, he was smoldering, his hair falling over his eyes, his tone sensual. His delivery on "Heartbreak Hotel" was also in a minor key, which always triggered a reaction in me. But it was when he slipped in those low-register Elvis-isms— you know, the huh-huh thing— it came from his body, not from his head. He had that emotional intensity that was impossible to resist.
    • Raquel Welch, in an interview with the Wall Street Journal on Oct. 25, 2013
  • He a had a magic combination of looks and voice, and you can̪t discount how good looking he was as a young man and he was the guy who really brought black music into the vocabulary.
    • Jann Wenner, co founder of RollingStone, in an interview for A&E's miniseries the Greatest 100 people of the millennium.
  • He was almost at the point where he was being recognized as a national star, but not quite. I'll give you an example. Once, in a railroad station in Chattanooga, TN, we were waiting to change trains. Elvis went over to a magazine rack and picked up a movie magazine. He found a photo of himself inside and says to me 'Al, can I have a pen?' I gave him one and he scribbled his name inside the magazine. Then he goes over to the two girls working at the rack. He had the spread open to his picture, showing it to them. He's also looking back at me with a huge Cheshire Cat grin. Their reaction was 'That'll be 35 cents sir'. Then Elvis said to them 'No, this is for you. I'm Elvis Presley'. In the meantime, I'm capturing pictures of all of this, which is really what I wanted.
    • Alfred Wertheimer, who took over 2,500 images of Elvis in a period of eight shooting days, divided in two groups, the first in March of 1956, at the specific request of RCA, and then in late September of 1958 on the day he left for Germany, as a soldier in the U.S. Army, in an interview with EIN's online page on April 30, 2011.
  • Can I talk to Elvis? said the caller. “This is Jimmy Carter”. Indeed it was the then President-elect calling from Atlanta, where he'd seen him the day before, to ask Elvis to be a youth spokesman. A few hours later, with the temperature near zero and the wind gusting to 30 mph, Elvis rousted his entourage and ordered everyone to the airport for the flight home. They got on the Lisa Marie, but the pilot couldn't get it started right away, so they all huddled together in blankets waiting for the plane to start and heat up. And then they get word of a bomb threat, so they had to sign papers authorizing it to take off anyway. As the plane rolled down the runway at Pittsburgh airport, we all just sat there in silence looking at each other and wondering if this was going to be it. Had that been “it,” Elvis would have gone out on a high note.
    • Tim Wesley from his book, “My Boxes: A Nostalgic Collection of Stories and Stuff,”
  • It's our responsibility as musicians to keep pushing each other, to keep competing with each other. It's a really great competition. I see here artists like Beyonce and Alicia Keys and Rihanna and Chris Brown and Chris Martin, all in the same room, and we're going to push this music to the point where it was like in the 1960s and '70s, when the talk was about Led Zeppelin, and Jimi Hendrix, and the Beatles. We (all) will be the new Beatles. We (all) will be the new Hendrix; (in fact) in any other industry, they'll tell you that you're supposed to do better than those in the past, so when you say, 'I want to be Elvis,' they say, 'What's wrong with you?' Well, I wanna be Elvis.
    • Kanye West, in accepting Best Album honors in the Rap & Hip-Hop category, at the American Music Awards, on November 23, 2008
  • I once met a young man from Mexico who asked me why Elvis didn't like Mexican people because he'd heard the rumours that he had criticized his countrymen. I told him it was all lies and that Elvis loved Mexicans. He told me that Elvis was supposed to have said Mexicans were greasy haired people. I told him to remember that Elvis was the one who put stuff in his hair to make it greasy and he even died it black too. There were many reports about things Elvis was supposed to have said that he never did, in fact he was upset that he wasn't allowed to go into Mexico because of riots. On the set of Fun In Acapulco, Elvis got upset with the director,(Richard Thorpe, who had already directed him in "Jailhouse Rock") because he got onto a couple of the actors because they spoke broken English and even yelled, “Jesus Christ, can’t you get the lines right?”. Elvis took him aside and said, 'Sir, those people were hired by the producer and he knew how they spoke and also knew their language, but he wanted them and they're doing the best they can. Rehearse with them more or whatever but please don't be doing that. I don't like you doing that to them' and the director stopped it.
    • Sonny West, who was Elvis' bodyguard until 1976, in his autobiography Fame and Fortune.
  • We had crew cuts, wore tee-shirts and blue jeans, Elvis had the long duck-tail, the long sideburns and he wore the loud clothes, and naturally he was a target for all the bullies. One day luckily I walked into the boys' bathroom at Humes High School and 3 guys were going to cut his hair just, you know, to make themselves look big or make them feel big or whatever, and I intervened and stopped it. And I guess that stuck because a couple of years later after Elvis had his first record he came over and asked me if I would like to go with him, I think it was Grenada, Mississippi or somewhere, and I went and I was with him from then on, except for a couple of years in the Marine Corps.
    • Red West, who went to high school with Elvis, then became one of his bodyguards until 1976, as told in an interview with Elvis Australia on May 29, 2008
  • With his blue eyes he should photograph well with black hair.
    • Paramount's top make-up artist Wally Westmore's suggestion to producer Hal Wallis, after meeting Presley in early October of 1956, in preparation for his second movie, "Loving You", which was shot in Technicolor in early 1957. Wallis approved and his hair was then dyed black, as noted in za.pinterest.com/pin/268879040226515826/ on January 28, 2018. Wallis approved and his hair was then dyed black.
  • We all know, of course, that Elvis was a philanthropist and humanitarian. The stories of his generosity are legendary. Yet here is a tidbit that I believe is a monumental testament to his true nature, one that most people have never heard. On Christmas Eves when most of us spend that entire special evening with our families, Elvis would leave the house and go to the local jail. He visited every prisoner no matter their race, gender, creed and the severity of the alleged crime and talked with every single one. I was told by the officers he would ask each one why they were there and how he could help them. And help them he did in any way he could. He took notes, planned what he would do for each and every one he could possibly do something for. Of course in most of our religions and particularly Christianity, we are taught that Jesus told us to comfort those in need, feed the hungry, clothe the naked, heal the sick, shelter the homeless etc."I was in prison and ye visited me" is one that I venture to guess not many of us, even though we call ourselves Christian believers, would ever do. Elvis Presley not only believed what he was taught, but physically acted on those teachings. Most of us (including me) somehow decide this one instruction is just easy to ignore and/or better left "out" of our good deeds. Still, he kept contacting their families to see if they needed financial assistance. Were their children alright? Their husbands or wives̞? And he made certain they would be helped once they served their time and that they had proper representation in the court by a decent attorney. How many of us would do this at any time, let alone on Christmas Eves?
    • Soprano Kathy Westmoreland, the little girl with the high voice, as Elvis used to call her during the tours she accompanied Elvis in the 1970's, in an article entitled ̊"How Elvis Secretly Spent His Christmas Eves̊" 2011.
  • Believe me, Benny just had this incredible electricity about him. He was the Elvis Presley of Cleveland.
    • Wayne Weston's laud of his early band mate Benjamin Orr, later founder of The Cars in an article entitled Let's go: Benjamin Orr & The Cars by Joe Milliken and published on Glide-s magazine December 21, 2019 8 edition.
  • The voice is so melodious, and – of course, by accident, this glorious voice and musical sensibility was combined with this beautiful, sexual man and this very unconscious – or unselfconscious stage movements. Presley's registration, the breadth of his tone, listening to some of his records, you'd think you were listening to an opera singer. But...it's an opera singer with a deep connection to the blues, which leads me to the role of the great enunciator, because he delivered us the greatest cultural boon. Nobody ever did more for the American people. He gave them the great present of black music transmitted through his own sensibility, his own sensitivity. Of course Elvis was a different kind of white purveyor of black music because it was naturally black and it was real and he was a conduit. And America was really changed. I'm talking about American music and our culture in general. We owe far more to Elvis Presley than all the British groups put together."
    • Jerry Wexler, co-founder of Atlantic Records, whose bid of US$30,000 came up short of the US$35,000 offered by RCA, for the purchase of Elvis' contract with SUN Records in November of 1955.
  • If Rock and Roll were a religion, Elvis was its most prolific disciple, responsible for more converts than anyone before or after him; if it had been country, Elvis was a Founding Father and his lyrics were the documents of freedom that helped to birth the nation; if it were a sickness, Elvis-itis would be the most potent and contagious virus known to man, infecting victims who just looked at his image, heard his voice or saw him perform in person or through a recording. But since Rock and Roll is music, we’ve all decided the world over to just call Elvis…the King.
    • A. C. Wharton African American Mayor of Shelby County, Tennessee, in commemoration of what would have been Elvis' 74th birthday, at the Graceland mansion, and as published by www.elvis.com, on 8th January 2009.
  • The Star Wars movies belong in the same category as Elvis Presley movies: They’re popular yet are all but unwatchable — except that the Presley pictures evince a human touch".
    • Armond White's opening paragraph in reviewing "The Last Jedi" for the "National Review"'s December 15th edition.
  • I'd heard that song many times. But that night in jail was the first time I really heard it. It was more important to me than any song I'd ever heard in my life. When he hit that hook in the song, "It's now or never," it was like someone grabbed me by my shirt, looked at me and said, "You asshole. You see where you're sitting, Barry? You're sitting in jail, and you can't stand it. You've got to change your life. It's your decision. It's now, or it's never." That's the way I read it. And when I got out, I told myself, Never again."
    • Barry White from an interview in Playboy magazine's April 2000 edition.
  • In 1968, a “drive-by” wasn't a shooting, it was popping into the salon for a fast touch up. Elvis Presley came to my salon just to say hello sometimes. When he'd show up, the ladies leaped out of their shampoo pools, they wanted his attention so badly.
    • Carrie White, for LA Mag, in an article entitled "Hairdresser to the Stars Carrie White Recalls the Summer L.A. Changed Forever", as published on August 12, 2019.
  • My father George C. White had gone to Yale for a year before he went to art school and I just wanted to go to Yale too. They allowed only three people a year in those days to major in theater and you had to audition and if you were accepted into the program, then you got a year's credit toward your master's degree. After college I joined the Army where, by chance, I met Elvis Presley, He was in the third army division, I was in the fourth but I ended up doing a show with him up on the Czech border in 1958. Because we were all freezing to death, we cooked up this show and Elvis said, ‘You’re in the theater, aren’t you, George?’ and I said I was, and he said, ‘Why don’t we put on a show and we can get out of guard duty? LOL. And we did.
    • George White, recalling the show they organized at the Mickey Bar in Grafenwöhr in December of 1958 in an article entitled "George White on Theater on the Record" as published in the August 1 2020 edition of the CT Examiner
  • An 18-year-old Elvis Presley walked through the doors of the Memphis Recording Service at 708 Union Ave. in the summer of 1953. He carried a beat-up guitar that he'd had since the age of 11 and enough money to make a $3.98 record of his own voice. He sang two '30s ballads -- "My Happiness" and "That's When Your Heartaches Begin" -- hoping to catch the attention of Sam Phillips, who had started his own label, Sun. When he was done, Marion Keisker, who helped run the place with Phillips, typed his name on the back of a label for Sun act The Prisonaires, and Presley left with his acetate. For more than six decades, that record of Elvis singing "My Happiness" was kept by the family of the high-school friend Presley left it with, Ed Leek. As part of an auction, it was valued at approximately $100,000. It sold to an unknown Internet bidder for $300,000...
    • Identifying the bidder, musician Jack White, who had also appeared in a cameo role portraying Elvis in the movie "Walk Hard", as published by Billboard, on Jan. 15, 2015.
  • Elvis' producer Felton Jervis was a good friend of mine. All of a sudden I released ‘Polk Salad Annie ’ and it was a big hit single and then Felton called and invited my wife & me out to Las Vegas to see Elvis perform it. He did a good version of it, which of course he recorded for the live album. We hung out with Elvis for two or three days and just sat back in the dressing room and talked. We played a little guitar together – he really liked music. Elvis said, “Man, I feel like I wrote that song”. I said “You know, the way you do it on stage, it feels like you wrote it”. Then, in 1974, I was living in Memphis and it was about 4 o'clock in the morning when my phone rings. This German voice says “Mr. White, we are down at Stax records do you have any more songs? We need to do some songs.” I said “Well, who in the hell is this, why you calling me at this time?” He explained that he was Freddy Bienstock, Elvis' publisher. I asked if Felton was down there and he said he was. So I got up & ran into my studio and ran off a copy of ‘For Ol’ Times Sake' & ‘I’ve Got A Thing About You Baby’ and one other and went down the studio. I drove all the way to downtown Memphis and was met in this low, dark alleyway by two shady men in hats & coats. They said in this thick German accent “Did you bring zee tapes?” and I was ushered into this little bitty room! It was so strange & freaky. A real seedy part of town and these guys in their 50s or 60s and they had a little reel-to-reel in this dark cubby hole. They sit me down on a chair & they played two bars of ‘For Ol’ Times Sake' and ‘I Got A Thing’ and they played the third song. They said “We like the first two. Now you can go!” I said, “Hey man, I’ve driven this far, where’s Felton?” They said, “You don’t need Felton. We like these songs. You can go!” But at this point luckily Felton walked in and took me into the studio with me & him and Elvis, so it was cool then. Wow!
    • Tony Joe White in a 2002 interview with Piers Beagley at EIN's website page.
  • Virtually everything we hear on recordings and see on video and the concert stage can be traced to two icons: Elvis Presley and Buddy Holly.
    • John W. Whitehead, civil liberties and human rights advocate and founder of the Rutherford Institute, in his article ̊̊"The Day the Music Died: Remembering Buddy Holly (1936–1959)̊ , as published in Scoopʽs Tuesday, 5 February 2019 edition.
  • He defined American culture to billions of adoring fans around the world. Elvis fused gospel, country, and rhythm and blues to create a sound all his own, selling more than a billion records. Elvis also served nearly 2 years in the United States Army, humbly accepting the call to serve despite his fame. He later starred in 31 films, drew record-breaking audiences to his shows, sent television ratings soaring, and earned 14 GRAMMY Award nominations. He ultimately won 3 GRAMMY Awards for his gospel music. Elvis Presley remains an enduring American icon 4 decades after his death.
    • The White House's Press release on November 10, 2018, announcing Elvis being one of seven honoured, in his case and that of two others, posthumously, with his country's highest civilian award, the 2018 Presidential Medal of Freedom.
  • As he concluded one of his dynamic and frenzied concerts an attempt was made to honor him by giving him an ornate crown. Uncharacteristically and courteously, Elvis stopped and said, “ I am not the King. There’s only one King, and that’s Jesus Christ.
    • Keith Whitehouse, Pastor of the Sutter Creek Baptist Church in an article entitled Elvis and Jesus, as published in the Amador Ledger's June 19, 2021 issue.
  • Go ahead, moan all you like about Elvis. (But) this is still the single greatest rock & roll Christmas record ever made. Elvis' slurred, dirty, wailing delivery and Scotty Moore, Bill Black and DJ Fontana's walloping primitivo accompaniment put this over with a licentious zeal that never wears out its welcome. Although he favored gospel above all else, Elvis genuinely excelled as a blues singer (there simply ain't another white cat who can pull ‘em off as convincingly) and this wildly unlikely collision of atmosphere and theme rates as a minor, and altogether irresistible, masterpiece —
    • Jonny Whiteside's laud of "Santa Claus is back in town", as published in an article at LA Weekly, on December 2, 2016. The extraordinary piano playing heard on the recording is that of Dudley Brooks, the African American musician who worked with Presley in an additional 10 recording sessions, both before and after this particular one.
  • Around the world the only three words that need no translation to convey their meaning are ̊"Jesus, Coke and Elvis"
    • Peter Whitmere's laud on Elvis, as noted on his 1996 book of the same name.
  • We were booked to fly home the next day, but that night after the last show we got a telephone call from Colonel Tom Parker saying that Elvis would like to meet us on a film set at 2pm the next day. When we arrived Col. Parker met us and told us that Elvis had just gone out for a ride. Just then we heard what at first sounded like thunder coming from down the beach a long way off. As the sound got louder, we could see about 13 motorbikes side-by-side coming towards us. Elvis was in the centre of the riders as they roared onto the film set. What an entrance! I was spellbound! All together we had about two hours with Elvis. I told him that when I saw the first clip of him in "Jailhouse Rock", that's what got me into rock ‘n’ roll. We also talked about our tour of America. What a guy. A real gent. It was wonderful.
    • Barry Whitwam, drummer for the UK band Herman’s Hermits on the day he and lead singer Peter Noone met Elvis in Hawaii, in an interview with the "Express And Star" published on January 19, 2018.
  • It made me feel great to be with him. He fit in so easy. Driver, loader, gunner, and tank commander you had to learn all four positions. Seeing him operate a tank was normal. His parents, visited often and especially his mother was a great source of comfort to us young draftees,always telling us to take care of each other, like we were her children.When she passed away, he said he'd give everything he had to get her back, but he knew he couldn't do that. He showed me all the telegrams he got from celebrities, three books filled with them. Once in Germany we served in the 1st Battalion, 32nd Armor Regiment, 3rd Armored Division.Despite his fame, Elvis was always just one of the guys. In fact, he inspired the other men to be better, stronger soldiers. When things got tough you could be out at night, it's cold and raining and you're on guard duty, and he was out there, too. If he could do it, that made me feel like, OK, I can do this!" After serving two years, we both came home and I went to work for a flooring company, drove a dump truck and eventually became a building engineer for Memphis City Schools. With my wife we raised two daughters and they knew how proud I was to have serve alongside Elvis. One of my daughters laminated the famous photos of Elvis being inducted, with me right there behind him. I carry them everywhere, showing them even to strangers because I want everyone to know how good a person Elvis was. And I do smile when telling the story of the time I was drafted into the military with the most famous person on the planet. The years I spent with Elvis clearly had a lasting impact with me. He stuck with it, did his job as well as I did mine, and I appreciated that. It was great...
    • Nathaniel Wiggison, an African American from Memphis, TN, on his having served with Elvis in the Army, in an interview with wmcactionnews5, on March 28, 2018.
  • What drew me to him was that his music was subversive. When the Beatles came around, grown-ups saw them as four mop tops, and didn’t take it very seriously. But when he came on the scene, it was different, the adults really didn’t like his stage performances and dancing. I soon asked for a guitar and got one for Christmas. It wasn’t an expensive guitar. A few years later my mom, who was a single mother, got me a nicer guitar when she saw I was very serious about it. It was a Harmony.
    • Canadian Rock-blues singer and songwriter David Wilcox, on his early decision to be a musician, as reported by the Cornwall Seeker on its July 14, 2017' edition
  • When he joined the U. S. Army in March of 1958, the Navy, the Air Force and the Pentagon were left disappointed. All the armed services had put considerable effort into being his choice. The Navy had gone so far as proposing a special “Elvis Presley company,” which would be drawn from Presley's buddies, and others from Memphis. If that wasn't enough, Elvis would also be assigned quarters entirely for his own use. The Army, also eager to win his favor, suggested he might be flown globally from base to base in order to boost the morale of the troops. The Pentagon, for its part, floated the idea of Elvis immediately joining the Special Services, thus sidestepping the need for regular training. But regular training was precisely what Presley wanted.He joined the army, but turned down all offers of special treatment. Private Presley he was, and was paid $78 a month. His last day of active duty was March 5, 1960.
    • Wolfgang Wild, curator, writing for Considerable, in an article entitled "Elvis in the Army: All shook up" as published on March 1, 2019
  • My dad's head went into a fantasy, this idea of everything being better in America. Of course for his generation, that was very true. Everyone was going to drive in movies and drinking milkshakes and having hamburgers in America. We weren't doing things like that in the UK. I think a lot of that got caught up in the lyrics – all the kids in America are having a better, more interesting, more dangerous time than we were here. When Elvis and rock'n'roll was imported over from America, it was to a generation of kids whose parents had dealt with the war, and rationing, and they'd all been brought up in pretty poor conditions. So it was a great thing for the kids to dream about again. They dared to have an identity, for starters. They dared to dream through these great records imported from America. That's where the great love affair started for my father – as soon as he heard Elvis Presley record.
    • UK rocker Kim Wilde, recalling how her first hit, "Kids in America" written by her father Marty Wilde and her brother Ricky, came into being and as published on TEAMROCK, on 20 February 2018.
  • I was 17, so I go to Hollywood for a few days, staying with Patti Page, whose husband was then choreographer for Elvis in "King Creole". So I watched the shooting one day, then Elvis came over and started talking to me, invited me to dinner, at his hotel, the Beverly Wilshire. So after dinner we end up in his bedroom. And when he found out I was a virgin, he just picked up his guitar and sat on his bed and sang to me for about two hours. He was gorgeous in those days. I couldn't wait to tell all my girlfriends.
    • June Wilkinson, English model and actress, known for her appearances in Playboy magazine, as published on the Orange County Register on the day after Hugh Hefner's passing.
  • Overnight, or over a bite, you might say, the hand that's been punching out copy for the unconcerned becomes celebrated as the hand that was bitten by Elvis Presley. As a newspaper woman gnawed by the nation's top hound dog singer, I've been advised variously to sue for assault, take a rabies shot, inquire whether he brushes after every meal, or offer my paw to the museum. Yep, folks have really showed concern.
    • News reporter Betty Wilkirson, telling the Associated Press, which ran the story nationwide on July 3, 1956, that Elvis had bit her in the hand on June 28, 1956, as she asked him to pose for a photograph right after his appearance at College Park, in Charleston South Carolina.
  • Those who would wall off cultures from “outsiders” are would-be wardens.
    • George Will, Pulitzer Prize commentator, highlighting Elvis' love for and appreciation of R&B music in an article published in various newspapers, including the Washington Post and the National Review on 13 May, 2017 and entitled "Today’s Left Would Have Called Elvis’s Music ‘Cultural Appropriation’"
  • One evening Elvis Presley came backstage to see my show at Caesars Palace. I was in my dressing room with a few friends and well-wishers when Elvis arrived with his entourage. It was the first time I'd met him, and we got on very well; he was very gracious and polite, We talked about music and a few other things. After a while Elvis asked me to come over to his hotel, where he had some music he wanted to play for me. It was about 2:30 in the morning when we got back to Elvis's hotel, but as he opened the door of his suite, a wall of noise hit us. There must have been a hundred people in there. Elvis ignored them and led me through to a quieter room and started playing some of his favorite music: gospel About four in the morning I got up to go, but Elvis said, "Wait, I want to give you something." He went into the bedroom and came back with six or eight Navaho Indian belts with silver and turquoise buckles. "Pick one," he said. "I want you to have one." So I chose one, thanked him, and then headed back to my hotel. I still have the Navaho belt he gave me. I felt about it the way I did about those things my kids sometimes give me: You keep and proudly display them not because of what they are but because of who has given them to you.
  • I was in a large parking lot, on one side hosting a telethon I was involved in and the Monroe Civic Center, where Elvis was playing, on the other. He knew there was going to be a child in a wheelchair waiting for him, so he stopped on his way to his limo, totally tired, after the concert, but got oh his knees and placed a scarf around his neck. I felt like crying. Then he looked at me, I was 24, hugged me and told me a few stories one of them about how a co worker had encouraged him to record.
    • Anson Williams, in an interview in 2019, with Diana Lynn Band Candy, on youtube.
  • People talk of his range and power, his ability and ease in hitting the high notes. But the real difference between Elvis and other singers was that he could sing majestically in any style, be it rock, country, or R&B – because he had soul. He sang from the heart. And that is what made him the greatest singer in the history of popular music.
    • John Owen Williams, UK Record producer as published on on August 15, 2017, on the Conversation in an article entitled "Elvis’s voice: like Mario Lanza singing the blues"
  • The first line of the record is sung without accompaniment, punctuated at the end by two beats, two chords on the piano. Exquisite. And this pattern is repeated through the verse, a Capella singing, piano crash, more a Capella singing; and then Elvis sings the chorus backed only by the beautiful, lonesome sound of a walking electric bass. The risk —only a great voice can hang out there that naked — is impressive and the payoff is phenomenal. None of which would matter, I suppose, if it weren't that the voice that this perfect and daring bit of accompaniment supports is nothing short of awesome; spirit is walking throughout this recording, just put it on the phonograph, and the room fills with ozone. Darkness and gloom drip joyfully from every rafter. This "Heartbreak Hotel" voice is an instant old friend; it intimately and unforgettably announces the arrival of something big.
    • Paul Williams, writing about Elvis' "Heartbreak Hotel", which ranked in fourth place in Crawdaddy magazine's list of "The 100 best singles of all time"
  • That there is a seat in the front in the concert of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Elvis Presley.
    • Robin Williams's reply to James Lipton, executive producer, writer and host of the series "Inside the Actors Studio" when asked what he would like God to say when he arrives in heaven, as broadcast on Lipton's edition of January 29, 2001
  • He was so ahead of his time, and that's why he brought so many people together, with his music without it having it any racial barriers.
    • Serena Williams, US African American tennis player, in Elvis Elvis, an ABC 2002 special.
  • Eminem is regarded as one of the most important artists in the history of the hip hop genre even though his albums haven't been as genre-defining as so many of his peers, and his music is only tangentially influential when compared to a Rakim, 2Pac, Jay-Z or Kanye. He's mostly important for providing white fans a credible entry point into the genre. And we're supposed to be okay with that. We're not supposed to view Eminem and Elvis Presley as comparable. We're supposed to see Em as authentic and Elvis as a vulture. But Elvis raved about Black artists from Jackie Wilson to Mahalia Jackson, topped the R&B charts (and country charts) regularly, made headlines for facing Black audiences in Memphis when festivals were still racially segregated, chummed around with Ike Turner and B.B. King, and James Brown called him his “brother.” You don't really see a divide between Elvis and Black audiences until the “shine my shoes” rumor starts circulating in 1957. But that quote was always just a rumor. I also found it interesting that Elvis was vilified for a bullshit quote while people like Eric Clapton got zero flak for a very real one. B.B. King talked about this repeatedly, but the lie is louder,
    • Stereo Williams, in an article published at the Daily Beast on December 22, 2018, as well as reference to the fact that for decades Elvis has been slandered for something he never actually said, while many others, including Eric Clapton, were given a free pass for quotes that were real.
  • Elvis was the ideal in 'Orpheus Descending', and we were optimistic up to a point that he might make his first appearance on the stage, and then we hoped he would appear in a film. That was a madly delirious episode, because time, for the most famous people, simply has no meaning. People and things arrive at the slightest expression of desire or interest, and they disappear just as quickly. All questions are answered; every need fulfilled. He was elaborately polite with me: I think he saw me as some elder Southern gentleman who might give his father a loan at the bank downtown, but we soon saw that the discipline of a stage performance was beyond him. It was--and it is--frightfully boring for most people to show up and replicate and expand within a refined role. Still, I met him. I was in the presence. Diamonds and lard. There's your title.
    • Tennessee Williams, as told to James Grisson for inclusion in the latter's book ̊̊̊̊"Follies of God, Tennessee Williams and the women of the fog"
  • I am not a part of that. To Louisville, I am f-ing Elvis Presley. So why would I pay anybody for anything?
    • professional basketball player Terrence Williams, as told to TMZSports, when questioned to comment on his being mentioned in Katina Powell's “Breaking Cardinal Rules” book, as one alleged to have paid $500 for sex.
  • I met Elvis Presley at the "Dick Clark Show" at Circus Circus in Las Vegas, a place where a great musical extravaganza with some of the greatest artists of the day would always appear. So, we were sitting in the audience and Jackie Wilson had just finished his set and then Dick Clark came out, but before he introduced the next act he wanted to announce someone special had arrived, "Ladies and Gentlemen" The lights went down and all of a sudden spotlights went to the back of the room. I looked around and it was Elvis, He was looking cool and wearing shades, snatched them off as if saying, "Hello Everybody!, then came walking down the aisle to his table and when he saw Louise, he stopped and said "Hi Louise. Hi Nikki" and they started talking. I stood up and he said "Hi." I said "Hi, I'm Pepe. It's nice to meet you." I shook his hand. He said something else to Louise, and then said "See you later" and went to his table. By the time I was in Las Vegas, I had already met tons of celebrities, Ray Charles, Stevie Wonder, Patti LaBelle and the Bluebells, Dionne Warwick and Wayne Newton. I also met Ike and Tina Turner. I drank champagne with Adam Clayton Powell and I met Redd Foxx. But, when I saw Elvis, I said, now that man's a star. It was a different kind of thing."
    • Pepe Willie, African American Soul/Funk/R&B Singer/Musician/Producer and President of Pepe Music Inc who was Prince' former mentor, talking in a phone interview on May 12, 2013
  • America loves a phoenix, and we sure got one when Elvis dusted off the ashes of his mid-‘60s movie career and put on black leather for the greatest of all network TV music specials. Thom Zimny has done a video re-edit on some of the performances and it’s more fun to watch all this material after reading the collection’s written oral history of how many ways the special could have gone wrong yet somehow, for once, went so beautifully right. And what joy it is to re-experience Elvis caught even fleetingly in hip-swiveling flight.
    • Chris Willman, writing for Variety in an article entitled "The 10 Best Music Boxed Sets of 2018", as published on their December 28, 2018 edition.
  • I was with Sophia Loren in the Paramount Studios Commissary (in early 1958), where we were going to have lunch and suddenly she was on her feet as he had spied Elvis walking through. I don't think she had ever met him, but Italian enthusiasm cannot be denied. In a minute she was sitting on his lap, tousling his hair. The skirmish was over as quickly as it begun as she was only saying how much she liked his music. He was also aware that I was taking their pictures, so what could he do? What could any man do? Surrender...
    • Bob Willoughby, in his memoirs entitled "Bob Willoughby: A Cinematic Life" , on the day Elvis and Sophia Loren met.
  • I was frightened by Elvis, I think because I was 10, but my sister Nancy loved him..
    • Ann Wilson, of the group Heart, as told to David Letterman on his 10/6/1982 show.
  • I was recording with Terry Melcher at RCA Victor Records in 1975, so were We were working on the song "Why Do Fools Fall in Love?" when suddenly Terry said, “Hey, Elvis is in the next studio recording.” That was a big surprise to hear he was in the studio next to me. So I walked into the studio and said, “Hi, I’m Brian Wilson” and he goes, “Hello Duke.” I don't know why he called me Duke. I said, “Would you like to hear what I’m doing in the studio?” and he said yes. So we walked over to my studio and listened to what I was doing and then said he had to leave. It was a thrill to meet him. I liked Elvis Presley's songs, but never saw him live. I thought he was a very underrated singer, more of a star. He was really known more for his fame than his voice. I think he deserved more credit for his voice.
    • Brian Wilson, of the Beach Boys, on meeting Elvis. as published in the book, Elvis from those who knew him best.
  • There was a time when in some circles, people may not have thought it cool to say they were an Elvis fan, but I am, I loved him."
    • Carl Wilson, of the Beach Boys,in an interview in 1980, as reported by YouTube
  • A lot of people have accused Elvis of stealing the black man’s music, when in fact, almost every black solo entertainer copied his stage mannerisms from Elvis.”
  • It is probable that he will eventually settle into the mainstream of popular singers. When he does he may well build a reputation as one of the most remarkable of white blues singers, possibly the first to invade successfully the field of country blues.
    • John S. Wilson, Jazz critic for the NYT, reviewing Elvis first two albums, as published on that paper's January 13, 1957 edition
  • Elvis Presley jerked his torturous way across the stage of the Municipal Auditorium on Sunday, sang eight or ten songs, thumped on a guitar, fell to the floor, knocked over microphones and set off a din of teenage squealing. At the evening performance he contorted his body in such a manner as to cause whole platoons to rush to the edge of the stage. In fact, he flings his limbs about and quivers in such a way as to make one think he might have a trick knee or hip, possibly from an old war injury...but this is not the case. This is just Elvis Presley....
    • Pen Wilson, reviewing for the Times-Picayune Elvis' two back to back New Orleans concerts on August 12, 1956, and as published on that paper on the following day.
  • I was such a great fan of his, I saw all his movies, and always thought I would one day meet him. But I never did, so this is full circle for me.
    • Oprah Winfrey's words on the night she became the first person not a member of the Presley immediate family to sit, and have dinner at the Graceland dining room since his death, as the special guest of Lisa Marie, who asked her if she had been an Elvis fan. (Special Oprah show telecast on October 10,2006).
  • I objected to Madonna's casting, because it made the project "an Elvis film."
    • Debra Winger's explanation over why she quit her starring role in director Penny Marshall's 1992 baseball film, "A League of Their Own."
  • I knew him when he was quite young, in 1956, when he was dating Natalie Wood, and they would very inconspicuously wear white clothes and, if they went to the movies, everyone would be looking at them, and not the film. LOL. In my house, I have a couch where they would make up, and to this day, when I tell visitors about it, they can̪t believe it. It is the same couch.
    • Shelley Winters, in a 1979 interview on the making of the ABC film Elvis, where she plays Elvis̪ mother Gladys.
  • Boris Yeltsin was best known for his role as the President of Russia, but he also had another unique claim to fame: Moscow's biggest Elvis Presley fan. According to sources, Yeltsin was a huge fan of Presley and would often listen to his recording of “Are You Lonesome Tonight?” during times of stress, such as in August, 1991, when he prevented a coup by standing on top of a tank. But while Yeltsin loved Presley, he hated staples with an equal amount of passion, as reflected in a memo from a Yeltsin aide demanding that no one use staples on any papers given to their fearless leader, as "this practice holds up the President’s very decisions.”
  • I've done everything for Elvis that I possibly can to keep the legend going. That operation -which provided me with pouty lips, a jaunty chin and a more Presleyesque nose was just the beginning...
    • Dennis Wise, the first person to undergo plastic surgery to look like Elvis, in an article published in the Orlando Sentinel on January 4, 1987. His operation, in 1978, was the subject of international media headlines and, starting in 1980, he became a successful Elvis Tribute Artist.
  • As many have observed, Palin’s rise was an important waypoint on the journey that brought America to the Trump era, and tribute acts like Greene and Cawthorn. By today’s standards, the “going rogue” brand pushed by the no-nonsense hockey mom from Walisa seems positively wholesome. And to revisit the outrage it generated feels a bit like watching those clips of Fifties prudes panicked about the damage Elvis Presley’s gyrating hips might be doing to teenage girls’ minds.
    • Oliver Wiseman, in an article entotled "Have the Republicans gone too far?,Sarah Palin has a lesson for outrage-hunting politicians", as published in UnHerd's April 7, 2022 edition.
  • He was a mild tempered, quiet, nice guy who treated everyone the same. I once overheard one of Elvis' friends at the time ask Elvis 'Why do you call him 'mister' -- he's just a black barbecue guy?' Elvis looked at him and said 'He's a man'. 'That', Withers says, 'Was the humility in his temperament'. 'Elvis was a great man and did more for civil rights than people know.
  • Once when we'd been in the field for two months, the Company Commander asked us all to clean up. Elvis didn't quite make it into the barracks without being spotted by some cleaning women. They followed him upstairs right into the shower-room and a bunch of guys from privates all the way up to the Colonels joined the parade too. Right when he was taking a shower, people were shoving pieces of paper under the water for him to sign. He was laughing about it but he never could get away from people..
    • Lonnie Wolfe, 17 year old who ran away from home to join the US Army and ended up being deployed to the 3rd Armored Division, as told to ElivisinAustralia in an interview dated February 10, 2018.
  • That boy made his pull from the blues, and if he stopped, he stopped, but he made his pull from there..
  • It was like an EARTHQUAKE!!! In my neighborhood the whole place was shakin' when he came on. And I said how can a person possess that kind of power that it even comes off the tv and grabs me in this ghetto neighborhood? Back in those days if it was a white artist doing some of our music many would say "Well, they don't like our blacks so we don't like their singers either. They're nothing but copy-cats anyway.' But with Elvis we ALL were going crazy over him. And I said 'Man, this cat's really got something!"
    • Bobby Womack, singer-songwriter, musician, producer, instrumentalist, sideman in the Gospel, R&B, soul, rock and roll, doo-wop, funk, soul blues, rock and jazz categories, as noted in the documentary The Echo will never die.
  • That September, Presley would make his legendary inaugural appearance on "The Ed Sullivan Show," singing a sultry version of "Hound Dog" with his swinging hips in all their vulgar, gyrating splendor. During a later appearance in January 1957, the variety show would famously edit the King from the waist down in order to protect impressionable young television viewers from his brazen sexuality. But then, it was far too late. America had a full-on dose of Elvismania, and there was nary a cure in sight.
    • Kenneth Womack, in an article entitled "Shelter in place with "Elvis Presley," a foundational classic rock album" as published in Salon's May 30, 2020 edition.
  • In essence, because at that time the backward mental capability that many people had of judging a person because of their skin color,and it does still exist, but back then it was even worse, BUT because he actually was a Caucasian brother, Elvis was able to do away with all that thinking towards music.
    • Stevie Wonder, Soul, Funk and R&B prolific singer/songwriter,as quoted on the documentary 'Elvis Presley & The Black Community – That Echo Will Never Die'
  • He really enjoyed doing the sessions and worked harder than he had done in years..
    • Bobby Wood, the American Sound Studio's top keyboardist and a menber of the Memphis Boys, describing Elvis' feelings during the January and February of 1969 recording session which yielded, inter alia, "In the guetto", "Suspicious Minds", "Dont cry daddy" and "Kentucky Rain" and as taped in an interview held in November of 2005 by Joe Chambers, Director of Nashville's Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum.
  • Every morning when I woke up and looked out the window, there were at least two hundred kids lined up on the sidewalk outside, staring at the house. Some of them would stay there all day long, just trying to get a glimpse of him. And when he would go out, he was very sweet to them. A lot of people I know would get angry, or impatient -- but Elvis was very nice to them, spent as much time with them as he could.
    • Actress Natalie Wood, as published in quotes about education.com
  • X-ray records felt like the real thing to (Soviet) rock-starved kids. When doing national service in Berlin, I came across a couple of bedraggled teenage Soviet soldiers who had just climbed over the fence. "Why did you want to take this risk?" I asked them, as they could so easily have been shot. ‘Because our officer won’t let us listen to Elvis Presley,’ one of them answered.
    • Excerpted from the book "How the Beatles rocked the Kremlin", by Leslie Woodhead, and as published by The Mail Online's 25 April, 2013' edition.
  • You didn't make it before we came along, and if I wanted to back somebody, I would have picked somebody who can sing, like Elvis Presley.
    • Drummer Mick Woodmansey's way of telling David Bowie, with whom he then worked during the Spiders from Mars era, that they were not just a band, as he had suggested. From his autobiography published in October of 2016
  • During the Louisiana Hayride in the mid-50s, my grandmother was in line to get a hamburger and Elvis Presley moseyed on up to her, small talked a bit and asked her out on a date. Being she was already with my grandpa, she declined, but for more than 60 years, she never let him forget it...
    • Kimberly Wooten, account manager for Rally Marketing, telling the Daily Advertiser about her mother's loyalty to her dad, and how she held him accountable, in an article published on the Daily Advertiser on June 5, 2108
  • There are some artists that appear to be a clear step ahead when it comes to intellectual property protection, Elvis Presley and 50 Cent being leagues ahead when it comes to portfolio size amongst the top ten artists which were made part of the study
    • World Trademark Review's assessment of advances made by Elvis Presley Enterprises vis-a-vis the so called Intellectual Property protection in an article entitled ̊"From K-pop to Presley: inside the trademark portfolios of the music industry's biggest names" as published on their March 21, 2019 edition.
  • Elvis Presley, in the midst of his 1968 comeback special, admitted “I’ve got to do this sooner or later, I may as well do it now, baby”. He then launched into Hound Dog ( via Heartbreak Hotel), which was what everyone wanted. I can't help keep thinking that Theresa May should have taken inspiration from this.She had to confront her ERG Leaver wing at some point, why not sooner (baby)? What could May have won, if she'd confronted her strong Leavers back far ago in 2016? What if she'd challenged them to a showdown not in Christmas 2018 but the summer or autumn, say, of 2016?
    • Ben Worthy, Lecturer in Politics at Birkbeck College, in an article published by the Huff Post on December 3, 2018 and entitled "What if Prime Minister Theresa May had confronted her Brexit wing sooner?
  • I remember on New Year’s Day of 2021 feeling, along with the ongoing uncertainty and lack of clear knowledge about the virus, a sense of hope. I also had no idea that a fair number of people would decide not to get vaccinated. I usually try not to judge people, but I grew up in a time when polio was at least as frightening as COVID has been the last couple of years. I remember a newspaper photo of Elvis Presley receiving his polio shot, an event that sent the vaccination rate into orbit all across the country. Elvis, for those who don’t remember, had just played the Ed Sullivan show and had something like a third of the entire nation watching. I’m pretty sure I was 12 when I saw the photo of Elvis getting his polio shot. I got my shot not so very long after that. Nobody took a picture of my shot, but having protection against polio sure gave my mom one fewer thing to fret over. I’m not much good at New Year’s resolutions. I decided in the coming year to simply try to stay safe and do everything I can to avoid putting anyone else at risk. That’s a resolution I think I can keep.
  • Go into any Thai restaurant the world over and there will very likely be portraits and photos of King Bhumibol gazing down at diners with his benevolent smile, but one of the more common actually features him with Elvis Presley. The meeting came when lifelong music fan Bhumibol and his wife, Queen Sirikit, visited Hollywood’s Paramount Studios in 1960, while Elvis was filming G.I Blues. The king had been a fan of Presley for several years and was by then an accomplished saxophonist who later performed alongside jazz legend Lionel Hampton. In 1987, the late Hampton told the Thai magazine Sawasdee: “He is simply the coolest king in the land.”
    • Adam Wright, for the South China Morning Post, in an article published the day following King Bhumidol's death, at age 88, on 14 October 2016.
  • The Frank Lloyd Wright fans!! Undoubtedly. Why? Because they're on the side of Nature and the others are on the side of an artificiality that is doomed.
    • Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's nonsensical reply to Mike Wallace's question on which group of youth, the Lloyds Wright fans, counted at the most in the thousands, or Presley fans, counted in the tens of millions, did Lloyd Wright think were to "inherit" the country in 1972, in an interview which took place on January 9, 1957. He had less than 2 years to live.
  • My father wanted me to be like him, an Orthodox Jew. When I said I didn’t want to be, he said, ‘just don’t tell your children.’ I said, ‘you want me to pretend to be somebody I’m not?’ He said, ‘that’s exactly what I’m saying.’. Anyways, he was Elvis' proctologist, so on the day I was supposed to meet him, I got into trouble and he didnt allow me to. When Elvis died, my dad remembered him as a respectful Christian who helped Jews on the Sabbath....
    • Steve Wruble, as published in Broaadway World's review of his one man show and as published in its May 6, 2022 edition.
  • The peak of peak attention can be assigned and exact date: September 9, 1956, when Elvis Presley made his first appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show, at CBS. Its 82.6 percent share of viewers, out of a population roughly half of today' s, has never been equaled or bettered
    • Tim Wu, as noted in his 2016 book "The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads"
  • He is rock's greatest presence, shaking a country with a single-handed nuclear reaction of country, gospel, and the blues.
    • Rock critic Bill Wyman's laud of Elvis, who he ranked #4 in his list of the best and worst amongst the 214 members of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, as published in Hitsville on May 2, 2018
  • Elvis was the kind of guy never looked past you, he looked right at you, was the warmest, most twinkling. He made you feel comfortable and at ease, which was amazing. He did not have any of that stuff where 'it's all about me'. He was a perfect gentleman. And he made you feel comfortable right away, at least he did with me. I'd go further and say that Elvis was clearly a guy with a rural or country attitude about life. He had that simple kinda point of view that said you stand up, you're polite to people. In spite of the money and the Cadillacs and all that, it was he and his pals, he never changed. And you could see that the minute he said hello to you. He was not a guy that would talk to you and look over your shoulder to see who else was in the room. Elvis Presley had a genuineness that was very noticeable and quite impressive the first time I met him. And Elaine and I went home really liking him and thinking 'what a terrific guy'. And everytime I saw him after that, he remembered everything, was always gracious and complimentary to people. It wasn't easy to get to see him, I mean, he had a very limited circle of friends. But when you did get in his company it was a real pleasure.
    • Steve Wynn, businessman and art collector and according to Wikipedia, one of the top 100 most influential people in the world, in a 2009 interview.
  • In examining how rock, soul and R&B grew from the roots of gospel, our program on the Gospel Roots of Rock and Soul shall highlight such highly influential artists as Sam Cooke who transitioned from gospel to secular music Sister Rosetta Tharpe and her early rock stylings and Elvis Presley, who helped expose white audiences to gospel music. Examples of some of the most beloved contemporary pop music of the last 60 years from artists such as Aretha Franklin, Paul Simon, and Ray Charles illustrate gospel music's influence. Gospel Roots of Rock and Soul also features exclusive live performances recorded by WXPN within the last year from gospel groups The Fairfield Four, The McCrary Sisters, and The Dixie Hummingbirds.
    • WXPN, the nationally recognized leader in Triple A radio, in an article published in wwwprwebcom̪s on January 15, 2019 edition.

X[edit]

  • Elvis Presley Atomic Player B612 has a weight of just 130 grams, plays music from tablets, phones and virtual service: Apple Music, QQ Music. It has a radio as well. The device is made of aluminum, with a supply battery which can be used remotely for seven hours. The energy accumulator takes place via MicroUSB. Demand for the device has grown increasingly....
    • Xiaomi, the Chinese Corporation's description of the Elvis Presley Atomic Player, a set of their 2018 portable speakers,as published in The Silver Telegram's edition of August 26, 2018

Y[edit]

  • After marvelling at the large portions of food, thick steaks and TVs in our various Canadian hotel rooms, we actually spend much of our time watching cartoons. In fact, spent my $100 advance, meant to last me for three weeks, right away, mostly on new skates, some bubble gum and the latest Elvis Presley album.
    • Alexander Yakushev, Twice Olympic and World ice hockey champion best known as the the player who scored most points for the Soviet Team that played Team Canada in the September 1972 Summit Series, in an article entitled "Yakushev finds Fame, almost 50 years later" as published in the Toronto Sun on November 9, 2018.
  • My mother took me to see "Jailhouse Rock" when I was three. She loved Elvis. I guess I thought, like John Lennon, that that looked like a pretty good job. I bought my first Elvis record at seven. I got an old tennis racket and I'd go around the house playing it like a guitar, playing Elvis songs. I'd turn my collar up and do the lip sneer, the whole thing. I was a little boy being Elvis! I knew I was a little girl, but I was being myself. I never understood the gender difference, frankly. It never stopped me: I never thought, 'I'm a little girl, I can't do this.'
    • Susan Yasinski, lead singer and founder of Susan and the Surftones, explaining what drew her to rock music, at an early age, as published by Curve, a lesbian magazine on 20 September 2016.
  • I was always mesmerized by strong, pure, beautiful voices, (and) Elvis' voice, the emotion in it, was unbelievable; I'd never heard anything like it, and I was listening to my parents' records, like "Heartbreak Hotel" and all the ’50 s stuff, the real raw Elvis...and that's how I gravitated into Patsy Cline, Linda Ronstadt and Emmylou Harris.
    • Tricia Yearwood music superstar, telling Martin Bandyke of the Detroit Free Free Press who are her four biggest influences, as published in the Arkansas Democrat Gazette (27 May 2008).
  • I first heard him in 1959, when I was 27. My favourite song of his is “Are You Lonesome Tonight, a 1961 song in which I found solace, by playing it over, and over, and over again during the weeks preceding and following the aborted 1991 coup against Mikhail Gorbachev .
    • Boris Yeltsin, the Russian Federation's first President, as detailed in John Heileman's article entitled "Rouble without a cause", published in the 1991 Autumn edition of "Modern Review"(foreword, page 5)
  • He was rock and roll's biggest star, and he also tested the boundaries of how an entertainer should behave on stage. Elvis had the whole package: the looks, voice, charisma--he had it all. I see so many videos on YouTube showing younger Elvis fans reacting to Elvis' music in a positive way. So, it shows you that Elvis' legacy and appeal continue to endure.
    • Brandon Yip in his 2021 book Elvis Presley: ‘All Shook Up’ in Canada.
  • Elvis had a brilliant ability to control the attack and ending of each note. If we listen the 1954 Sun Records recording of "Blue Moon of Kentucky" we can hear Elvis using a technique known as “glottal onset and offset” – in which the vocal folds in the larynx are closed at the start of a note and closed with extra emphasis at the end of the note – to achieve clarity of attack and an amazing rhythmic bounce in his vocal performance. That ability to drive the rhythm is also present in the 1963 hit "Viva Las Vegas" in which Elvis effortlessly accents the melody to give a rhythmic shape to each phrase.
    • Adrian York, Senior Lecturer in Commercial Music Performance, University of Westminster, in an article entitled Elvis voice, like Mario Lanza singing the blues, and published on the Conversation on August 17, 2017.
  • When the question was asked, in March of 2018, “Who do you think is the greatest rock star of all time?” it yielded these results: Elvis Presley 36%, Michael Jackson 21%, John Lennon 9%, Jimi Hendrix 7%, Mick Jagger, 5% Bruce Springsteen 4%, Others 5%, Not sure 13%.
    • Results from a 2018 YouGov Ratings US poll, showing as they put it "Presley’s admiration and fame still at the top", forty one years after his death and published in News Legit's online edition of August 16, 2018-
  • I asked him what did Dr. King think of the celebrity participation in the movement. He said that Dr King welcomed it because it helped give the movement more attention. Then he added a bonus by including stories of two of my other favorite singers who tragically, like Dr. King, died young themselves. I was astonished when the name Elvis Presley came up. Contrary to what some people believe, I never thought Elvis was racist. I knew that Elvis grew up poor and was heavily influenced by Black musicians. I even heard stories from other people that Elvis admired Dr. King. What I didn't know was that Elvis and Dr. King talked occasionally on the phone. Elvis even contributed money through various channels that filtered to the civil rights movement. Charles Evers, the brother of slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers, confirmed this as well. When Dr. King was killed in Memphis, Elvis was said to not just have been upset about Dr. King's death, but he was even more hurt that it happened in his hometown and just a stone's throw away from his Graceland estate. Elvis even inquired about attending Dr. King's funeral in Atlanta, but was talked out of it by others citing that he may be a distraction; it would delay filming and increase budget costs (and other security concerns because nobody could be certain that a riot may break out at the funeral at the time. Instead Elvis watched the funeral from his on-location trailer. According to his co-star at the time Celeste Yarnell who watched the proceeding with Elvis in his trailer, Elvis "felt a tremendous brotherhood with the black community because he grew up poor and he knew what it was like to live in poverty.He was also proud that many blacks embraced him as one of their own.
    • About Andy Young's knowledge on the thus far secret relationship between Dr. MLK Jr. and Elvis, as told by him to African American music critic Gary Butler, during a 2018 Q&A session with Andrew Young.
  • I'm like Elvis Presley out here. I’m Swaggy Presley.
    • Nick Young, reacting after the Pepsi Center embraced him in a manner bordering on hysterical, as he was Elvis at The Ed Sullivan Show, and as reported on BSN dwebver on December 16, 2018.

Z[edit]

  • Her voice was optimism shaded with occasional sorrow, joy tempered by the understanding that nothing in life can be perfect, but above all it was a sound that both absorbed and radiated light. To hear it is to feel bathed in that light. She died on Thursday at age 76, and her death closes an era. She belongs not just in the pantheon of great soul singers, but in the realm of great artists period: John Coltrane, Elvis, the Beatles, Billie Holiday—with them, she helped give shape to the second half of the 20th century.
    • Stephanie Zacharek, Pulitzer Prize winner, writing her eulogy of singer Aretha Franklin, for TIME, on the day of her death, August 16, 2018.
  • He was the son of Afghanistan’s former prime minister, a prolific recording artist and a music idol for the masses. His music drew from Persian poetry as well as Indian classical styles, and it increasingly revealed a political edge, criticising the Soviet-backed Marxist regime who had seized power in Afghanistan following a 1978 military coup. There is some dream-like footage online of a 1970s gig at Kabul’s Intercontinental Hotel, showing an energetic figure leading a multi-instrumental band. The performer’s hip looks (dark quiff and sideburns; loosened tie) and rollicking, psych-roots grooves reflect the ‘Afghan Elvis’ nickname he earned.
    • About Ahmad Zahir, whose life and still unaccounted death is being celebrated with a 2018 documentary as published in the BBC's December 7, 2018 edition.
  • Some of those we have lost in 2019ː Elvis Presley (singer, actor, 84), perpetrator of the finest prank in history and of two of the best comeback concerts ever seen...
    • British comedian Andy Zaltzman's zany interpretation of what would have happened if Elvis had not died in 1977 but in 2019, as published in the iNews The Essential Daily Briefing Register for December 25, 2018.
  • This is the mysterious part about music, the people who mean it, like Elvis, are generally the ones who are processing some kind of loss, and we connect to it.
    • Warren Zanes, musician and writer, as laid out in the notes for the 2018 HBO three hour documentary he directed and entitled "Elvis Presley: The Searcher"
  • Elvis has just left the building, Those are his footprints, right there, Elvis has just left the building, To climb up that heavenly stair
    • Frank Zappa from his 1988 album "Broadway the hard Way"
  • Can't you just imagine digging up the King? Begging him to sing?.
    • Warren Zevon, rock singer-songwriter and musician, in his song, "Jesus Mentioned".
  • He is the Elvis of cultural theory
    • About Slavoj Žižek, as noted in the International Journal of Žižek Studies, 2011 Facebook page.
  • Elvis' 1969 opening night in Las Vegas was his first time back on a live stage in more than eight years, playing the biggest showroom in the biggest hotel and drawing more people for his four-week engagement than any other show in Las Vegas history. His performance got rave reviews, “Suspicious Minds” gave him his first number-one hit in seven years, and Elvis became Vegas's biggest star. Over the next seven years, he performed more than 650 shows there, and sold out every one. Las Vegas was changed too. The intimate night-club-style shows of the Rat Pack, who made Vegas the nation's premier live-entertainment center in the 1950s and ‘60s, catered largely to well-heeled older gamblers. Elvis brought a new kind of experience: an over-the-top, rock-concert-like extravaganza, setting a new bar for Las Vegas performers, with the biggest salary, the biggest musical production, and the biggest promotion campaign the city had ever seen. In doing so, he opened the door to a new generation of pop/rock performers, and brought a new audience to Las Vegas—a mass audience from Middle America that the city depends on for its success to this day.
    • Richard Zoglin in his 2019 book "Elvis in Vegas: How the King of Rock 'n' Roll Reinvented the Las Vegas Show":
  • What was the Strip like back then, or what was it like to see Elvis Presley.....
    • Lynn Zook, in her book Classic Las Vegas: A look back at the city 1956–1973
  • I knew him when he was a kid. He used to play the guitar and go around with quartets and to Negro ‘sanctified’ meetings. He lived near the colored section, and people around here say he's one of the nicest boys they ever knew. He just doesn't impress me as the type of person who would say a thing like that.
    • W.A. Zuber, an African American, as told to reporter Louis Robinson and quoted in the latter's article debunking the rumor that Elvis was a racist, as published in Jet magazine's issue of August 1, 1957
  • No, many thanks but I am just a tourist here and prefer no photos are taken.
    • Mark Zuckerberg's reply to Rhonda Lamb, in charge of the tour operation and management around Elvis' Tupelo Birthplace and Museum, when she asked him whether he would like to appear as part of the usual group photos, as noted in the October 2, 2017, edition of the Clarion Ledger.
  • I shall always regret not having seen Elvis Presley live...
    • Canadian politician Gene Zwozdesky, answering the Edmonton's Star question on what would it be a concert he would have liked to attend, as published in that newspaper on 20 August, 2016.
  • Our childhood housekeeper kept us supplied with a handwritten list of records. And when our mom would go out shopping and say, “Kids, can I get you something?,” we'd say, “You going by the record store? Here’s the list.” And sure enough, it was Jimmy Reed. It was Larry Williams. It was Ray Charles. All the good stuff. My sister and I played the sides off of those records. We'd turn those 45 rpm singles white. And I remember my mom taking us to see Elvis Presley and that kind of did it ... we had the music bug. And then my father took me down to a recording session at ACA, that was Bill Holford's place. And he put me in a chair and he said, “I’ll be in the office if you need me. Stick around because there are some musicians gonna make a recording session.” And I was kind of enjoying it, and who should walk in but B.B. King and his band. So between seeing Elvis and watching B.B. King record, it was carved in stone.
    • ZZ Top' Billy F.Gibbons for Texas Monthly's January 7, 2019 edition.

See also[edit]