Richard Henry Horne

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Richard Henry Horne (later Richard Hengist Horne) (January 1, 1803March 13, 1884) was an English poet and critic.

Quotes[edit]

  • 'T is always morning somewhere in the world.
    • Orion (1843), Book iii, Canto ii. Compare: "'T is always morning somewhere", Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Wayside Inn. Birds of Killingworth, stanza 16.
  • A sweet content
    Passing all wisdom or its fairest flower.
    • Orion (1843), Book iii, Canto ii.
  • The wisdom of mankind creeps slowly on,
    Subject to every doubt that can retard
    Or fling it back upon an earlier time.
    • Orion (1843), Book iii, Canto ii.
  • Far out at sea,—the sun was high,
    While veer'd the wind and flapped the sail,
    We saw a snow-white butterfly
    Dancing before the fitful gale,
    Far out at sea.
    • Genius; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 88.
  • The laurel-tree grew large and strong,
    Its roots went searching deeply down;
    It split the marble walls of Wrong,
    And blossomed o'er the Despot's crown.
    • The Laurel Seed; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 439.
  • Ye rigid Plowmen! Bear in mind
    Your labor is for future hours.
    Advance! spare not! nor look behind!
    Plow deep and straight with all your powers!
    • The Plow, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919); reported as The Plough in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 18-19.
  • On me, on me
    Time and change can heap no more!
    The painful past with blighting grief
    Hath left my heart a withered leaf.
    Time and change can do no more.
    • Dirge; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 342-44.

External links[edit]

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