Sighs

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Sighs are especially audible, single exhalations of air out of the mouth or nose, that humans use to communicate emotion. It often arises from a negative emotion, such as dismay, dissatisfaction, boredom, or futility. A sigh can also arise from positive emotions such as relief, particularly in response to some negative situation ending or being avoided.

Sourced[edit]

  • Sigh'd and look'd, and sigh'd again.
  • My soul has rest, sweet sigh! alone in thee.
    • Petrarch, To Laura in Death (c. 1348-1350), Sonnet LIV, line 14.

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations[edit]

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 707.
  • Sighed and wept and said no more.
    • Isle of Ladies. Erroneously attributed to Chaucer as Dream, line 931.
  • Implores the passing tribute of a sigh.
    • Thomas Gray, Elegy in a Country Churchyard, Stanza 20.
  • To sigh, yet feel no pain.
  • Oh, if you knew the pensive pleasure
    That fills my bosom when I sigh,
    You would not rob me of a treasure
    Monarchs are too poor to buy.
  • Yet sighes, deare sighes, indeede true friends you are
    That do not leave your left friend at the wurst,
    But, as you with my breast, I oft have nurst
    So, gratefull now, you waite upon my care.
  • * * Sighs
    Which perfect Joy, perplexed for utterance,
    Stole from her sister Sorrow.

External links[edit]

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