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  • Nicholas Rowe (1674–1718), English dramatist, poet and miscellaneous writer, was appointed Poet Laureate in 1715. And one false step entirely damns her
    2 KB (277 words) - 14:35, 28 September 2015
  • Rovabokola, Ratu Viliame Rove, Karl Rovelli, Carlo Rowan, Carl Rowe, Elizabeth Rowe, Nicholas Rowland, Helen Rowland, Kevin Rowling, J. K. Roy, Arundhati
    18 KB (1,193 words) - 01:19, 10 March 2016
  • made the throne her seat, And none could be unhappy but the great. Nicholas Rowe, The Fair Penitent (1703), Prolog Greatness knows itself. William Shakespeare
    29 KB (4,571 words) - 09:08, 17 May 2016
  • And ravish'd from me all my soul held dear. Thou hast betray'd me. Nicholas Rowe, Lady Jane Grey (1715), Act II, scene 1, line 235. 'Tis too much proved—that
    11 KB (1,694 words) - 12:26, 25 March 2016
  • Unfortunate Lady, line 4. Is this that haughty, gallant, gay Lothario? Nicholas Rowe, The Fair Penitent (1703), Act V, scene 1, line 37. Taken from Massinger's
    18 KB (2,807 words) - 01:45, 23 February 2016
  • bounty of thy hand, Shall cry to Heaven, and pull a blessing on thee. Nicholas Rowe, Jane Shore (1714), Act I, scene 2, line 173 Mortem misericors sæpe
    20 KB (2,901 words) - 12:49, 27 March 2016
  • Fielding, p. 24. Great minds, like heaven, are pleased in doing good. Nicholas Rowe, p. 24. Never try to save out of God's cause; such money will canker
    7 KB (1,112 words) - 02:26, 2 November 2014
  • my speaking; But though my mouth be dumb, my heart shall thank you. Nicholas Rowe, Jane Shore (1714), Act II, scene 1. Thou thought'st to help me; and
    15 KB (2,331 words) - 18:01, 22 January 2016
  • much of old renowned? Mrs. Centilivre, Cruel Gift. Epilogue written by Nicholas Rowe. He was … a heart of oak, and a pillar of the land. Wood—Ath. Oxon.
    44 KB (5,903 words) - 19:53, 29 April 2016
  • had courage, was a sage, 'tis true, And lov'd his country. Epilogue to Rowe's Jane Shore (1714). Well, if our author in the wife offends He has a husband
    32 KB (4,877 words) - 00:34, 19 April 2016
  • pris'ner, and the mourner Fly for relief, and lay their burthens down. Nicholas Rowe, The Fair Penitent (1703), Act V, scene 1, line 138 I died as a mineral
    168 KB (25,790 words) - 09:56, 20 April 2016
  • spectres from the yawning deep, And set the ministers of hell at work. Nicholas Rowe, Jane Shore (1714), Act IV, scene 1, line 240. Fear is the main source
    26 KB (3,899 words) - 20:44, 16 January 2016
  • than painting can express, Or youthful poets fancy, when they love? Nicholas Rowe, The Fair Penitent (1703), Act III, scene 1. Remember that the most
    65 KB (9,906 words) - 20:55, 17 May 2016
  • land in civil wars. Nicholas Rowe, Jane Shore (1714), Act III, scene 1, line 198. War, the needy bankrupt's last resort. Nicholas Rowe, Pharsalia, Book
    252 KB (37,540 words) - 12:53, 25 May 2016
  • is free who has not obtained the empire of himself. As translated by Nicholas Rowe(1732) No man is free who cannot command himself. As quoted in Moral
    98 KB (14,270 words) - 18:51, 12 May 2016