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  • William Browne (1590?–1645?) was an English poet, born at Tavistock, Devon, educated at Oxford, after which he entered the Inner Temple. Whose life is
    846 bytes (100 words) - 18:09, 25 November 2015
  • printed 1629), Act III, scene 1. Rich with the spoils of nature. Sir Thomas Browne, Religio Medici (1642), Part XIII. There are no grotesques in nature; not
    62 KB (9,337 words) - 15:04, 24 March 2016
  • Colley Cibber (category English poets)
    pious fool that rais'd it. Act III, scene 1. Similar thought by Sir Thomas Browne. I 've lately had two spiders Crawling upon my startled hopes. Now though
    4 KB (665 words) - 19:06, 28 September 2015
  • Thomas Browne, Hydriotaphia, Urn Burial (1658). Same idea in Robert Burton, Anatomy of Melancholy (1621), p. 107. (Ed. 1849). Also in an old French poet Racan
    27 KB (4,272 words) - 15:37, 17 January 2016
  • they counterfeit some real substance in that invisible fabric. Sir Thomas Browne, Religio Medici; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations
    49 KB (7,811 words) - 11:48, 19 March 2016
  • Browne, Hydriotaphia, Chapter V. For those sacred powers Tread on oblivion: no desert of ours Can be entombed in their celestial breasts. William Browne
    3 KB (396 words) - 04:00, 27 October 2015
  • in Didot's Poet. Com. Græ., p. 407. When we desire to confine our words, we commonly say they are spoken under the rose. Sir Thomas Browne, Vulgar Errors
    13 KB (2,005 words) - 19:33, 22 July 2016
  • Thomas Edward Brown, Tom (satirist) Browne, Harry Browne, Jackson Browne, Sir Thomas Browne, Sylvia Browne, William Brownell, Henry Howard Browning, Elizabeth
    40 KB (2,567 words) - 08:27, 11 July 2016
  • indisposeth us for dying. Sir Thomas Browne, Hydriotaphia. Whose life is a bubble, and in length a span. William Browne, Britannia Pastorals, Book I, Song
    139 KB (19,858 words) - 21:12, 29 June 2016
  • past. The poet's voice need not merely be the record of man, it can be one of the props, the pillars to help him endure and prevail. William Faulkner,
    49 KB (7,928 words) - 17:38, 24 March 2016
  • in, we cannot hear it. William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice (late 1590s), Act V, scene 1, line 57. Therefore the poet Did feign that Orpheus
    53 KB (8,180 words) - 13:12, 24 July 2016
  • To be nameless in worthy deeds, exceeds an infamous history. Sir Thomas Browne, Hydriotaphia, Chapter V. 'Tis not what man Does which exalts him, but
    12 KB (1,783 words) - 01:21, 28 October 2015
  • Richard Lovelace (category English poets)
    proportion; and thus far we may maintain the music of the spheres", Thomas Browne, Religio Medici, Part ii, Section ix; "The mind, the music breathing from
    4 KB (627 words) - 17:00, 4 January 2015
  • Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 426. Well languag'd Danyel. William Browne, Britannia's Pastorals, Book II. Song 2, line 303. Pedantry consists
    22 KB (3,291 words) - 03:00, 23 July 2016
  • manuscript collection of Browne's poems preserved amongst the Lansdowne MS. No. 777, in the British Museum, it is ascribed to Browne, and awarded to him by
    24 KB (3,820 words) - 18:49, 2 January 2016
  • Langdon Smith (category American poets)
    woof of love and brought them down through the ages as one. Lewis Allen Browne, in the foreword to Evolution : A Fantasy (1909). Ten seconds into the
    9 KB (1,127 words) - 18:34, 22 September 2015
  • Cambridge books he sent, For Whigs allow no force but argument. Sir William Browne, Epigram, in reply to Dr. Trapp. And gladly wolde he lerne and gladly
    22 KB (3,368 words) - 15:06, 26 June 2016
  • Thomas Browne, Works, II, 26 (1708 edition); Letters from the Dead (1701), Works, II, p. 502 The thousand doors that lead to death. Sir Thomas Browne, Religio
    168 KB (25,790 words) - 09:56, 20 April 2016
  • Yeomen of England. A wise man is out of the reach of fortune. Sir Thomas Browne, Religio Medici. Quoted as "That insolent paradox". The wisdom of our ancestors
    38 KB (5,769 words) - 20:20, 21 July 2016
  • to Paris in 1862. I look upon you as a gem of the old rock. Sir Thomas Browne, Dedication to Urn Burial. No, when the fight begins within himself, A
    56 KB (8,796 words) - 13:07, 24 July 2016

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