Victor Hope, 2nd Marquess of Linlithgow

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Truth is the only foundation of honour, and the sunrest source of a man's influence with his fellow-men.
War is an evil thing.

Victor Alexander John Hope, 2nd Marquess of Linlithgow (24 September 1887 – 5 January 1952) was a British Unionist politician, agriculturalist, and colonial administrator. He served as Governor-General and Viceroy of India from 1936 to 1943. He was usually referred to simply as Linlithgow.

Truth is the only foundation of honour, and the surest source of a man's influence with his fellow-men.

Quotes[edit]

  • Advice can never take the place of experience. That which advice can sometimes do is to make experience more fruitful of good; to help us the better to understand the lessons of life; and when those lessons are sharp and unwelcome, to bear them with an even and unruffled mind.
    • 12 September 1936, Advice to the pupils of the Bishop Cotton School, Simla, also quoted in Speeches and Statements of the Marquess of Linlithgow, p. 19
  • Truth is the only foundation of honour, and the surest source of a man's influence with his fellow-men. When you come across someone of whom those who know him say "so-and-so told me such and such a thing, so it must be true"– you are dealing, believe me, with a man to be reckoned with. But there are other aspects of Truth not quite so obvious as those with which I have been dealing. We have been thinking about Truth as between ourselves and others. There is also, and just as important, the matter of Truth within ourselves.
    • 12 September 1936, Advice to the pupils of the Bishop Cotton School, Simla, also quoted in Speeches and Statements of the Marquess of Linlithgow, p. 19-20
  • No one can possess what we call good judgement, which is about the same thing as an instinct for recognizing Reasonable Probabilities, whose mind is not trained to follow truth. And in many of the most important things of life. Reasonable Probabilities are our only guides.
    • 12 September 1936, Advice to the pupils of the Bishop Cotton School, Simla, also quoted in Speeches and Statements of the Marquess of Linlithgow, p. 19-20
  • The removal from among us of a public man of exceptional capacity and marked personality still in the prime of life, is at any time a tragedy. The sense of loss on personal and public grounds, and the inevitable diminution of the effective influence which at all times so essentially depends on the winning personality of the individual, are keen and real.
    • 26 October 1937, Speech at the laying of the foundation-stone of the Sir Fazl-i-Hussain Memorial at Lahore, also quoted in Speeches and Statements of the Marquess of Linlithgow, p. 102.
  • We are living in troubled times. None can see far into the future, or can pretend to guess what new order, social, political or economic, may emerge for the world in the next few years. At such a time individuals, communities, nations, and all mankind are in desperate need of the virtues of courage, self-confidence, mutual trust and understanding, which alone can lead the peoples of the world to build again what has been shattered, and bind themselves together more strongly in a spirit of unity, brotherhood and goodwill.
    • 4 January 1940, Speech at Rajkumar College, Sarangarh, also quoted in Speeches and Statements of the Marquess of Linlithgow, p. 221.
  • We have, I suspect, a long way to go yet. We may have to face many very difficult and awkward situations. It may well be that the real test still lies ahead of us.
    • 10 January 1940, Speech at Orient Club, Bombay, also quoted in Speeches and Statements of the Marquess of Linlithgow, p. 227.
  • I well know that there are many people who press for swifter and more radical solutions of the problems before us.
    • 10 January 1940, Speech at Orient Club, Bombay, also quoted in Speeches and Statements of the Marquess of Linlithgow, p. 229.
  • I do not question the sincerity or the good intentions of those who feel that way.
    • 10 January 1940, Speech at Orient Club, Bombay, also quoted in Speeches and Statements of the Marquess of Linlithgow, p. 229.
  • Art never thrives, though its seeds may continue to live, during a period of intellectual complacency or of political chaos, such as, those which followed the disintegration of the Roman Empire and the end of the Mughal Period. Greek Art of the Periclean Age and the Art of the Italian Renaissance rose out of a trough of conventionalism on the uprising of a great wave of fresh ideas and new values, of bold and courageous experiment.
    • 12 January 1940, Speech at the opening of the Annual Exhibition of the Bombay Arts Society, also quoted in Speeches and Statements of the Marquess of Linlithgow, p. 231.
  • I am optimistic enough to believe that out of the struggle in which we are engaged today a new world will be born; a world of security, confidence, prosperity and co-operation; a world in which the arts of peace can flourish. Let us hope so, at any rate for, paradox though it may seem, that is what we are fighting for.
    • 12 January 1940, Speech at the opening of the Annual Exhibition of the Bombay Arts Society, also quoted in Speeches and Statements of the Marquess of Linlithgow, p. 231.
  • War is an evil thing.
    • 26 March 1940, Speech at St. John Ambulance Association and Indian Red Cross Society, also quoted in Speeches and Statements of the Marquess of Linlithgow, p. 241

External links[edit]