William Scott, 1st Baron Stowell

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The law of cases of necessity is not likely to be well furnished with precise rules; necessity creates the law, it supersedes rules; and whatever is reasonable and just in such cases, is likewise legal.

William Scott, 1st Baron Stowell (17 October 174528 January 1836) was an English judge and jurist.

Quotes[edit]

  • A dinner lubricates business.
    • As quoted in Life of Johnson (1791) by James Boswell, Vol. viii., p. 67, note
  • Ambition breaks the ties of blood, and forgets the obligations of gratitude.
    • As quoted in History of the Anti-Corn Law League (1853), by Archibald Prentice, p. 54; around 1876 this began to began to be cited to W. Scott, and then around 1880 sometimes to Walter Scott, but without citations of source, including a variant: "Selfish ambition breaks the ties of blood, and forgets the obligations of gratitude" in a publication of 1907.
  • The elegant simplicity of the three per cents.
    • As quoted in Lives of the Lord Chancellors (1845) by John Campbell, Vol. x. Chap. 212; this precedes the use by Benjamin Disraeli of "The sweet simplicity of the three per cents", in Endymion (1880)

External links[edit]

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