Danish proverbs

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"All want to be lords, but none want to carry the bag." The flag in the middle is the Danish flag. It is surrounded by the flags of the Union between Sweden and Norway.

Proverbs reflecting conventional wisdom in Denmark.

A[edit]

  • Æblet falder ikke langt fra stammen.
    • Translation: The apple does not drop faraway from the trunk.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Af god begyndelse haabes en god endelse.
    • Translation: A good beginning makes a good ending.
    • Meaning: "Starting properly ensures the speedy completion of a process. A – beginning is often blocked by one or more obstacles (potential barriers) the removal of which may ensure the smooth course of the process."
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "40". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 228. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "190". Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 185. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. 
  • Af to onde Kaar skal man vaelge det bedste.
    • Translation: Of two wrongdoings one should choose the best.
    • English equivalent: One should choose the lesser of two evils.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 5. 
  • Alderdom beskytter ikke mod dårskab.
    • Translation: Age does not protect against folly.
    • English equivalent: Wisdom goes not always by years.
    • Meaning: Age will not refrain some people from acting foolish and imprudent.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 39. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Alderen zūres med graa haar, men dyden kroner dem.
    • Translation: Age is sullied with gray hairs, but the virtue crowns them.
    • English equivalent: Gray hairs are honorable.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 35. 
  • Alder er en ond reisebroder.
    • Translation: Age is a wicked companion.
    • English equivalent: Age and poverty are ill to bear.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 177. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Alle ville herrer vǽre, ingen ville sǽkken bǽrre
    • Translation: All want to be lords, but none want to carry the bag.
    • English equivalent: There are too many chiefs and not enough Indians.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 991. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Armod og Kiarlighed ere onde at dölge.
    • Translation: It is hard to hide poverty and love.
    • English equivalent: Love, smoke and cough are hard to hide.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations. W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue). p. 50. 

B[edit]

  • Bange hjarte vandt aldrig fager mö.
    • Translation: Faint hearts have never won a fair lady.
    • Meaning: "It is necessary to be bold and courageous to win the heart of a woman – or to achieve any other cherished objective."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 84. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 22 September 2013. 
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 130. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Bedre en salt slid over sitt eget bord, end en fersk gedde overet fremmed.
    • English equivalent: Dry bread at home is better than roast meat abroad.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 754. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Bedre sent end aldrig.
    • Translation: Delayed is preferable to never.
    • English equivalent: Better late than never.
    • Meaning: "It is better that somebody arrives or something happens later than expected or desired, than not at all."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 25. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 30 June 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 584. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Beder gud dig drage, han får dig vel reb, beder han dig ride.
    • English equivalent: God who gives the wound gives the salve.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 878. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Betre noget en indet
    • English equivalent: Better an egg today than a hen tomorrow.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 75. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Blind høne kan også finde korn.
    • Translation: Blind hens can find grain too
    • Interpretation: Some things succeed because of luck.
    • English equivalent: A broken watch is right two times a day.
    • Kjær, Holbek (1969). Ordsprog i Danmark:. J. Paludan. p. 59. 
  • Bǿden sjelv bǿden steg stynker.
    • Translation: Unasked for service stinks.
    • English equivalent: Proffer'd service stinks.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1149. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Börn er vis sorg, men uvis gläede.
    • Translation: Children are definitive sorrow, but undefinitive joy.
    • English equivalent: Children are uncertain comforts but certain cares.
    • Meaning: "Children are bound to cause their parents anxiety, and may or may not also bring them joy."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 40. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 2 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 654. ISBN 0415096243. 

D[edit]

  • Den der jager to Harer af een busk, faaer sieden nogen af dem.
    • English equivalent: You must not run after two hares at the same time.
    • Meaning: "Concentrate on one thing at a time or you will achieve nothing. - Trying to do two or more things at a time, when even one on its own needs full effort, means that none of them will be accomplished properly."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "X". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. X. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 102. 
  • Den där ventär på död mands skoe, går länge barfodet.
    • English equivalent: Don't wait for dead mens shoes.
    • Meaning: "It is not good to be impatiently awaiting somebody's death or retirement to get what you want, such as a promotion."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 151. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 208. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Den hund som bieffer meget, han bider ikkun lidet.
    • Translation: Barking dogs seldom bite.
    • English equivalent: Barking dogs seldom bite.
    • Meaning: People who make the most or the loudest threats are the least likely to take action.
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 20 June 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 5. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Des mere man klapper katten, des hǿjere hun bærer rumpen.
    • Translation: Cat patting leads to hump raising.
    • English equivalent: The more you stroke the cat's tail, the more he raises his back.
    • Meaning: Displaying too much affection or desperation repels your friends and love interests.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1184. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Det bedste er det godste fiende.
    • English equivalent: ”Better is the enemy of good.”
    • Meaning: The aim for perfection or mastery might slow down progress.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 166. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Det er bedre, at vǽre ene, end at have en ond stallbroder.
    • Translation: It is better to be alone than to be in bad company.
    • English equivalent: Better be alone than in bad company.
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 572. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Det er en slem Fugl som besmitter sin egen Rede.
    • English equivalent: Don't wash your dirty linen in public; It is an ill bird that fouls its own nest.
    • Meaning: Don't speak in public of unpleasant private affairs; Don't speak ill of yourself and the groups you belong to.
    • F. Allen, Maria (2012). The Routledge Portuguese Bilingual Dictionary: Portuguese-English and English-Portuguese. Routledge. p. 439. ISBN 0415434343. 
  • Det er godt, at forlade sig på to ankere.
    • English equivalent: Good riding at two anchors, men have told, for if the one fails, the other may hold.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Det er ikke godt at holde en ål ved en hale.
    • English equivalent: You might as well try to hold an eel by the tail.
    • Meaning: Don't take a man by his word.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 480. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Det er intet hår så lidet, der jo haver sin skygge.
    • English equivalent: Every hair casts its shadow.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 4. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Det mål, I måler med, med skal I self få tilmålt.
    • English equivalent: Whatever measure you deal out to others will be dealt back to you.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1219. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Det sker intet nyt under solen.
    • English equivalent: Nothing is new.
    • Meaning: Absolutely everything has been done before.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1114. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Det stille Vand Har den dybe grund.
    • English equivalent: Still waters run deep.
    • Meaning: He who is taciturn might be that because his head is filled with ambitious thoughts.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 70. 
  • Du skal kravle, før du kan gå.
    • Translation: You have to learn to crawl before you can walk.
    • English equivalent: Learn to walk before you can run.
    • Meaning: "It is necessary to learn the basics before progressing to more advanced things."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 290. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Nielsson, Arne (1998). Viljen til sejr 2.0. ArtPeople. ISBN 8771084339. 
  • Du skal nog få kärligheden at föle.
    • English equivalent: "If you do good, good will be done to you.”
    • Meaning: Good acts quiet often reward themselves.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 160. ISBN 0415160502. 

E[edit]

  • Eder og aeg är snart brudne.
    • Translation: Eggs and oaths are soon broken.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 765. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Een skalk ska man fange med en anden.
    • English equivalent: Set a thief to catch a thief.
    • Mrs Mawr, E B (2005). Analogous Proverbs In Ten Languages (reprint ed.). Kessinger Publishing. p. 74. ISBN 1417964677. 
  • En blind hǿne finder også et korn.
    • Translation: A blind hen also finds a corn.
    • English equivalent: Even a blind pig may occasionally pick up an acorn.
    • Meaning: "An incompetent person or an unsystematic approach is bound to succeed every now and then by chance."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 75. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 8 September 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 36. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • En hest snubler, og har dog fire ben.
    • English equivalent: A good marksman may miss.
    • Meaning: Even the wisest and most competent man might make mistakes.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 57. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Enhver er sin egen lykkes smed.
    • Translation: "Everybody is the smith of his own happiness"
    • Possible interpretation: Don't wait for luck. Create your own happiness.
    • English equivalent: The world is your oyster.
    • Frellsen, Ulla (1995). Enhver er sin egen lykkes smed. Ulla Frellsen. ISBN 8798366610. 
  • Ethvert kart må stå på sin egen bund.
    • English equivalent: Every bird must hatch its own eggs.
    • Meaning: It is unwise to be financially dependent on someone else.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 777. ISBN 0415096243. 

G[edit]

  • Gerrighed er sin egen stedmoder.
    • Translation: Covetousness is its own stepmother.
    • English equivalent: The covetous man is good to none and worst to himself.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 83. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Giv skalken et spand, han tager vel heel alen.
    • English equivalent: Give him an inch and he will take a yard.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 240. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Gud giver alle dem mad, som han giver mund.
    • English equivalent: Each day brings it own bread.
    • Meaning: Try not to worry so much about the future.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 757. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Gå ikke over åen efter vand.
    • Translation: "Don't cross the stream to get water."
    • Meaning: Don't do things in a needlessly laborious way.
    • English equivalent: "Don't carry coal to Newcastle"
    • Larsen (2009). Mørke. Books on Demand. p. 85. ISBN 8776914542. 

I[edit]

  • I rǿrt vand er godt at fiske.
    • Translation: It is good fishing in streamy water.
    • English equivalent: It is good fishing in troubled waters.
    • Meaning: In taking advantage of chaotic conditions one can easily serve one's own purposes.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 391. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Ikke kan få øje på skoven for bare træer.
    • English equivalent: Missing the forest because of the trees.
    • Meaning: While tending to every detail you might miss out the big picture.
    • Harder, T. Mellem to sprog, Museum Tusculanums forlag, K√∏benhavns universitet.
  • Ikke smide barnet ud med badevandet.
    • Translation and English equivalent: Don't throw out the child with the bath water.
    • Meaning: Do not reject an idea entirely because parts of it are bad; Someone who is absolutely right about parts of an idea, is surprisingly often wrong about another part of it.
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 66. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 25 August 2013. 
    • Fransson, Ola (2009). Kunskapsbehov och nya kompetenser: professioner i förhandling. Books on Demand. p. 134. ISBN 9173350133. 
  • Ingen er mere döv end den som ikke vill höre.
    • English equivalent: None so deaf as those who will not hear.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1110. ISBN 0415096243. 

M[edit]

  • Man fanger flere Fluer med en Draabo Honing end med en Tünde CEdike.
    • English equivalent: You can catch more flies with a drop of honey than with a barrel of vinegar.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 100. 
  • Man må hyle med de ulve man er i blandt.
    • Translation: "One must howl with the wolves one is among."
    • English equivalent: "When in Rome do as the Romans."
    • Himmelstrup (2000). Den udødelige soldat og jeg: Ib Michael og hans forfatterskab. Museum Tusculanum forlag. p. 29. ISBN 8772896337. 
  • Man skal smede mens jernet er varmt.
    • Translation: "One should do the blacksmithing while the iron is hot"
    • English equivalent: "Strike while the iron is hot"
    • Possible interpretation: Seize the moment. Take the opportunity now; don't waste it.
    • Hofmann (2011). Hvorfor lugter mine egne prutter bedst. Politiken. ISBN 8740002322. 
  • Mands vilje er mands himmerig.
    • English equivalent: His own desire leads every man.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 977. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Mennesket agter, men Gud skifter.
    • Translation: Man proposes but God disposes..
    • Meaning: Things often don't turn out as you have planned.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 103. ISBN 0415160502. 

H[edit]

  • Han skal have fingre af jern, som fanden vil flaae.
    • Translation: He must have fingers made of iron, that the devil wants to flay.
    • Meaning: Someone who treats others badly will eventually turn on you.
    • English equivalent: He who sups with the devil must use a long spoon.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 920. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Han skal have meget smör, som skall stope var mans mund.
    • English equivalent: Pigs grunt about everything and nothing.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 331. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Herregunst, april-veyr, spare-ild, quinde-kier-lighed er ubestandig.
    • English equivalent: A king's favour is no inheritance.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 24. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Hunden gör og ad maanen.
    • Translation: The dog also barks at the moon.
    • Meaning: Let the world say what it will.
    • English equivalent: The dogs bark but the caravan passes on.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 340. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Hovmod står for fald.
    • Translation: Pride comes before fall.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1148. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Hvo der vil honning slikke, må ikke ræddes for bier.
    • English equivalent: Honey is sweet, but the bees sting.
    • Meaning: Suffering is the acceptable in the quest for something great.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 837. ISBN 0415096243. 

J[edit]

  • Jo vedlore Blod, jo mindre Hovmod.
    • English equivalent: Good blood always shows itself.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 34. 

K[edit]

  • Koen skal malkes igennem halsen.
    • English equivalent: It's by the head that the cow gives the milk.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1039. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Köbe katten i säkken.
    • English equivalent: Never buy a pig in a poke.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1101. ISBN 0415096243. 

L[edit]

  • Lid ei på en ander, det du selv kan gjøre.
    • Translation: Don't trust for others, what you can do yourself.
    • English equivalent: For what thou canst do thyself, rely not on another.
    • Latin equivalent: Ne quid expectes amicos, quod tute agere possis.
      • Translation: Expect nothing from friends, do what you can do yourself.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 600. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Lidet er om den mans vrede, som ingen vurder.
    • English equivalent: If you cannot bite, never show your teeth.
    • Meaning: Don't give out threats you can't carry out.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 138. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Ligesom die gamle fugle sienge fore, så hvidse de unge efter.
    • Translation: The young birds sings like the old birds.
    • Meaning: Children will become like older generations.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 138. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Läge, hjälp dig selv!
    • English equivalent: Physician, heal thyself!
    • Meaning: Don't see the faults in others. Correct your own faults instead.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1142. ISBN 0415096243. 

M[edit]

  • Mange hug faelder egen.
    • English equivalent: Little strokes fell great oaks.
    • Meaning: A difficult task, e. g. removing a person/group from a strong position, or changing established ideas cannot be done quickly. It can be achieved gradually, by small steps, a little at a time.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 252. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Man må gøre en dyd af nødvendighed.
    • English equivalent: Make a virtue out of necessity.
    • Meaning: Acquiesce in doing something unpleasant with a show of grace because one must do it in any case.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1079. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Medens græsset gror, dǿer horsemoer.
    • English equivalent: While the grass grows the steed starves.
    • Meaning: Dreams or expectations may be realized too late.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1228. ISBN 0415096243. 

N[edit]

  • Nye koste feje bedst.
    • English equivalent: "New brooms sweep clean."
    • Meaning: Newcomers are the most ambitious.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1103. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Når man vil slå hunden finder man lätt en kæpp.
    • Translation: If you want to beat a dog you will easily find a stick.
    • Meaning: Someone who wants to be mean will find things to be mean about no matter what.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 104. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Når den gamle hund gör, skal mn ud at vinduet.'
    • English equivalent: ”An old dog barks not in vain.”
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 55. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Nöd kommer gammel Kierling til at trave.
    • Translation: Need makes the old woman galop.
    • English equivalent: Necessity has no law.
    • Meaning: It is acceptable to break rules in times of need.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 60. 

O[edit]

  • Om hundred 'aar er alting glomt.
    • Translation: In a hundred years we will be dead anyway.
    • English equivalent: It will all be the same a hundred years hence.
    • Meaning: So what if you embarrass yourself?
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 48. 
  • Ofte er Ulvesind under Faareskind.
    • English equivalent: Beware of false prophets which come to you in sheep's clothing, but inwardly, they are ravening wolves.
    • Meaning: The seemingly most respectable people are quiet often in fact scoundrels.
    • From The Bible, Matthew 7:15. Specified as a proverb in: Mrs Mawr, E B (2005). Analogous Proverbs In Ten Languages (reprint ed.). Kessinger Publishing. p. 8. ISBN 1417964677. 
  • Ord slår ikke någon ihjäl.
    • English equivalent: Hard words break no bones.
    • Meaning: It is often good to tell someone a harsh truth constructively (including yourself).; It is a vey bad idea to lie to yourself.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 17. ISBN 0415160502. 

P[edit]

  • "Pels ikke bjørnen før den er skudt."
    • Translation: Don't skin the bear before it's been shot
    • English equivalent: "Don't count your chickens before they hatch"
    • Possible Interpretation: Don't think you have something, until you really got it.
    • skovforening (1926). Dansk Skovforenings tidsskrift. Dansk Skovforening.. p. 110. 
  • Pris en skön dag om aftenen.
    • Translation: Celebrate the day when it is evening.
    • Meaning: Don't celebrate until you are 100 % sure there is a reason to do so.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 200. ISBN 0415160502. 

S[edit]

  • Smedens hest og skomagerens kone har altid de dårligaste sko.
    • Translation: The smith's horse and the cobbler wife always have the worst shoes.
    • English equivalent: The cobbler's wife is the worst shod.
    • Meaning: "Working hard for others one may neglect one's own needs or the needs of those closest to him."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "7". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 65. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Som moderen er, så er datteren.
    • Translation: Such mother, such daughter.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • Meaning: Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and rarely.
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Stille vand har den dybe grunde.
    • Translation: Still waters run deep.
    • English equivalent: Still waters run deep.
    • Meaning: Those who are taciturn are perhaps taciturn because of the fact that their heads are filled with ambitious thoughts!
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 598. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Store ord gör själdent from gerning.
    • English equivalent: He that promises too much means nothing.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 92. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Symtom flyger på, men kryber av.
    • English equivalent: "Misfortune comes on horseback and goes away on foot.”
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 65. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Sätte alt på eet kort.
    • Translation: To put all on one card.
    • English equivalent: Don’t put all the eggs in the same basket.
    • Meaning: "Spread your risks or investments so that if one enterprise fails you will not lose everything."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 63. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 18 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 715. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Söde Ord fylde kun lidt i sakken.
    • English equivalent: Fine words butter no parsnips.
    • Meaning: Merely talking about a problem will not solve it.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 31. 
    • Source for meaning: Speake, Jennifer; Simpson, John (2009). The Oxford dictionary of proverbs. Oxford University Press. pp. 388. ISBN 0199539537. 
  • Sønen slægter gjerne faderen på.
    • Translation: The son has a penchant for taking after his father.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • Meaning: Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

T[edit]

  • Temmelig farlig er bedre end den bedste dom.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 68. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Tid, ebbe og flod venter ikke på nogen.
    • Translation: Time, low tide and flood waits for none.
    • English equivalent: Time and tide waits for no man.
    • Meaning: "Take, for illustration, the case of the negligent and unreflecting man. He resolves to accomplish a certain important object at some future period; but in the intervening time, some preparatory, though in itself comparatively trifling business, is indispensable. He defers this business; [...] At length the period for accomplishing the ultimate object arrives: but, alas! the prerequisite, so absolutely connected and essential, is neglected And then, vain man!
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 169. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 723. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Tid er penger.
    • Translation and English equivalent: Time is money.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1008. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Tro alle vel, men dig selv bedst.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 699. ISBN 0415096243. 

V[edit]

  • Veien til helvete er brolagt med gode forsetter.
    • Translation: The road to hell is paved with good intentions.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 257. ISBN 0415160502. 

Æ[edit]

  • Ærlighed varer længst.
    • Translation: Honesty last longest.
    • English equivalent: Honesty is the best policy.
    • Meaning: "Being honest or telling the truth is always the wisest course of action."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 128. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Oehlenschläger (1813). Ærlighed varer længst: idyl. 
  • Æt able som är rödt, er ofta råddent indvendigt.
    • English equivalent: A fair face and a foul heart.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 34. ISBN 0415160502.