Falcons

From Wikiquote
Jump to: navigation, search
My falcon now is sharp, and passing empty;
And till she stoop, she must not be full-gorg'd,
For then she never looks upon her lure. ~ William Shakespeare

Falcons are raptors in the genus Falco. The genus contains 37 species, widely distributed throughout Europe, Asia, and North America. Adult falcons have thin tapered wings, which enable them to fly at high speed and to change direction rapidly. Fledgling falcons, in their first year of flying, have longer flight feathers which makes their configuration more like that of a general-purpose bird such as a broadwing. This makes it easier to fly while learning the exceptional skills required to be effective hunters as adults.

Sourced[edit]

  • The falcon and the dove sit there together,
    And th' one of them doth prune the other's feather.
    • Michael Drayton, Noah's Flood; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 256.
  • The red rose whispers of passion,
    And the white rose breathes of love;
    O, the red rose is a falcon,
    And the white rose is a dove.
  • Say, will the falcon, stooping from above,
    Smit with her varying plumage, spare the dove?
    Admires the jay the insect's gilded wings?
    Or hears the hawk when Philomela sings?
  • Our hopes, like towering falcons, aim
    At objects in an airy height;
    The little pleasure of the game
    Is from afar to view the flight.
  • A falcon, tow'ring in her pride of place,
    Was by a mousing owl hawk'd at and kill'd.
  • My falcon now is sharp, and passing empty;
    And till she stoop, she must not be full-gorg'd,
    For then she never looks upon her lure.

External links[edit]

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:
Wiktionary-logo-en.svg
Look up falcon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary