Francis Hutcheson

From Wikiquote
(Redirected from Hutcheson, Francis)
Jump to: navigation, search
Francis Hutcheson

Francis Hutcheson (8 August 16941746) was an Irish philosopher.

Quotes[edit]

  • Wisdom denotes the pursuing of the best Ends by the best Means.
    • An Inquiry into the Original of our Ideas of Beauty and Virtue (1725), Treatise I, Sect. V
  • Whence this secret Chain between each Person and Mankind? How is my Interest connected with the most distant Parts of it?
    • An Inquiry into the Original of our Ideas of Beauty and Virtue (1725), Treatise II: An Inquiry concerning Moral Good and Evil, Sect. I
  • That Action is best, which procures the greatest Happiness for the greatest Numbers; and that worst, which, in like manner, occasions Misery.
    • An Inquiry into the Original of our Ideas of Beauty and Virtue (1725) Treatise II, Section 3
  • Men have been Laughed out of Faults which a Sermon could not reform.
    • The Dublin Weekly Journal, No. 12 (June 19, 1725)
  • All our Ideas, or the materials of our reasoning or judging, are received by some immediate Powers of Perception internal or external, which we may call Senses … Reasoning or Intellect seems to raise no new Species of Ideas, but to discover or discern the Relations of those received.
    • An Essay on the Nature and Conduct of the Passions and Affections (1728), Treatise II: Illustrations upon the Moral Sense, Sect. I
  • Whoever voluntarily undertakes the necessary office of rearing and educating, obtains the parental power without generation.
    • A System Of Moral Philosophy (1755), Book II, Ch. II
  • The ultimate notion of right is that which tends to the universal good; and when one's acting in a certain manner has this tendency, he has a right thus to act.
    • A System of Moral Philosophy (1755) Book II, Ch. III

External links[edit]

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about: