Julian Simon

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Julian Lincoln Simon (12 February 19328 February 1998) was a professor of business administration at the University of Maryland and a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute at the time of his death, after previously serving as a longtime business professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Simon wrote many books and articles, mostly on economic subjects. He is best known for his work on population, natural resources, and immigration. His work covers cornucopian views on lasting economic benefits from natural resources and continuous population growth, even despite limited or finite physical resources, empowered by human ingenuity, substitutes, and technological progress. His works are also cited by libertarians against government regulation. He died at the age of 65 of a heart attack in Chevy Chase, Maryland. He is also known for the famous Simon–Ehrlich wager, a bet he made with ecologist Paul R. Ehrlich. Ehrlich bet that the prices for five metals would increase over a decade, while Simon took the opposite stance. Simon won the bet, as the prices for the metals sharply declined during that decade.

Sourced[edit]

  • This increase in the world's population represents humanity's victory against death.
    • "The State of Humanity: Steadily Improving," Cato Institute Policy Report, September/October 1995 [1]
  • We now have in our hands—really, in our libraries—the technology to feed, clothe, and supply energy to an ever-growing population for the next seven billion years.
    • "The State of Humanity: Steadily Improving," Cato Institute Policy Report, September/October 1995 [2]
  • Progress toward a more abundant material life does not come like manna from heaven, however. My message certainly is not one of complacency. The ultimate resource is people — especially skilled, spirited, and hopeful young people endowed with liberty — who will exert their wills and imaginations for their own benefit and inevitably benefit the rest of us as well.
    • "The State of Humanity: Steadily Improving," Cato Institute Policy Report, September/October 1995 [3]

External links[edit]

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