Listening

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Listening is the act of hearing something and paying attention to what is heard.

Quotes[edit]

  • When people talk listen completely. Most people never listen.
    • Ernest Hemingway, letter of advice to a young writer, reported in Malcolm Cowley, "Mister Papa", LIFE magazine (January 10, 1949), Volume 26, No. 2, p. 90. A longer version appears in Hemingway's Across the River and Into the Trees (1967): "When people talk listen completely. Don't be thinking what you're going to say. Most people never listen. Nor do they observe. You should be able to go into a room and when you come out know everything that you saw there and not only that. If that room gave you any feeling you should know exactly what it was that gave you that feeling".

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations[edit]

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 461.
  • But yet she listen'd—'tis enough—
    Who listens once will listen twice;
    Her heart, be sure, is not of ice,
    And one refusal no rebuff.
  • He holds him with his glittering eye—
    * * * * * *
    And listens like a three years' child.
    • Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Ancient Mariner, Part I, Stanza 4. Last line claimed by Wordsworth. See note to his We are Seven.
  • Listen, every one
    That listen may, unto a tale
    That's merrier than the nightingale.
    • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Tales of a Wayside Inn (1863-1874), Part III. The Sicilian's Tale. Interlude Before the Monk of Casal-Maggiore.
  • In listening mood she seemed to stand,
    The guardian Naiad of the strand.

External links[edit]

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