New England

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I first drew in New England's air, and from her hardy breast
Sucked in the tyrant-hating milk that will not let me rest.

New England is a region in the northeastern corner of the United States consisting of the six states of Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.

Quotes[edit]

  • The one great poem of New England is her Sunday.
    • Henry Ward Beecher, in William Drysdale, compiler, Proverbs from Plymouth Pulpit (1887), p. 229.
  • I sing New England, as she lights her fire
    In every Prairie's midst; and where the bright
    Enchanting stars shine pure through Southern night,
    She still is there, the guardian on the tower,
    To open for the world a purer hour.
  • The most serious charge which can be brought against New England is not Puritanism but February.
  • I first drew in New England's air, and from her hardy breast
    Sucked in the tyrant-hating milk that will not let me rest.
    • James Russell Lowell, "On the Capture of Certain Fugitive Slaves Near Washington", Boston Courier, 19 July 1845; anthologized in Poems (1848).
  • Puritanism, believing itself quick with the seed of religious liberty, laid, without knowing it, the egg of democracy.
  • It was in making education not only common to all, but in some sense compulsory on all, that the destiny of the free republics of America was practically settled.
  • There is a sumptuous variety about the New England weather that compels the stranger's admiration — and regret. The weather is always doing something there; always attending strictly to business; always getting up new designs and trying them on people to see how they will go. But it gets through more business in spring than in any other season. In the spring I have counted one hundred and thirty-six different kinds of weather inside of twenty-four hours.
    • Mark Twain, New England Weather, speech to the New England Society (December 22, 1876).
  • One of the brightest gems in the New England weather is the dazzling uncertainty of it.
    • Mark Twain, New England Weather, speech to the New England Society (December 22, 1876).
  • We Americans have yet to really learn our own antecedents, and sort them, to unify them. They will be found ampler than has been supposed, and in widely different sources. Thus far, impress'd by New England writers and schoolmasters, we tacitly abandon ourselves to the notion that our United States has been fashion'd from the British Islands only, and essentially form a second England only — which is a very great mistake.
  • From purest wells of English undefiled
    None deeper drank than he, the New World's Child,
    Who in the language of their farm field spoke
    The wit and wisdom of New England folk.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

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