Fruit

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Fruit, in broad terms, is a structure of a plant that contains its seeds. In non-technical usage, such as food preparation, fruit normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures of certain plants that are sweet and edible in the raw state, such as apples, oranges, grapes, strawberries, juniper berries and bananas.

Sourced[edit]

  • My living in Yorkshire was so far out of the way, that it was actually twelve miles from a lemon.
    • Sydney Smith, Lady Holland's Memoir, Vol. I. P. 262, reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 437.

Generally[edit]

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)[edit]

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 303-04.

  • The kindly fruits of the earth.
    • Book of Common Prayer, Litany.
  • Nothing great is produced suddenly, since not even the grape or the fig is. If you say to me now that you want a fig, I will answer to you that it requires time: let it flower first, then put forth fruit, and then ripen.
    • Epictetus, Discourses, What Philosophy Promises, Chapter XV. Geo. Long's translation.
  • Eve, with her basket, was
    Deep in the bells and grass
    Wading in bells and grass
    Up to her knees,
    Picking a dish of sweet
    Berries and plums to eat,
    Down in the bells and grass
    Under the trees.
  • Ye shall know them by their fruits.
    Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles?
    • Matthew. VII. 16; 20.
  • Each tree
    Laden with fairest fruit, that hung to th' eye
    Tempting, stirr'd in me sudden appetite
    To pluck and eat.
  • Thus do I live, from pleasure quite debarred,
    Nor taste the fruits that the sun's genial rays
    Mature, john-apple, nor the downy peach.
  • The strawberry grows underneath the nettle
    And wholesome berries thrive and ripen best
    Neighbour'd by fruit of baser quality.
  • The barberry and currant must escape
    Though her small clusters imitate the grape.
  • Let other lands, exulting, glean
    The apple from the pine,
    The orange from its glossy green,
    The cluster from the vine.

Specific types[edit]

Peach[edit]

  • A little peach in an orchard grew,—
    A little peach of emerald hue;
    Warmed by the sun and wet by the dew
    It grew.
    • Eugene Field, The Little Peach; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 591.
  • As touching peaches in general, the very name in Latine whereby they are called Persica, doth evidently show that they were brought out of Persia first.
    • Pliny the Elder, Natural History, Book XV, Chapter 13. Holland's translation; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 591.
  • The ripest peach is highest on the tree.
    • James Whitcomb Riley, The Ripest Peach; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 591.

Pear[edit]

  • "Now, Sire," quod she, "for aught that may bityde,
    I moste haue of the peres that I see,
    Or I moote dye, so soore longeth me
    To eten of the smalle peres grene."
    • Geoffrey Chaucer, Canterbury Tales, The Merchantes Tale, line 14,669; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 591.
  • The great white pear-tree dropped with dew from leaves
    And blossom, under heavens of happy blue.
    • Jean Ingelow, Songs with Preludes, Wedlock; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 591.
  • A pear-tree planted nigh:
    'Twas charg'd with fruit that made a goodly show,
    And hung with dangling pears was every bough.
    • Alexander Pope, January and May, line 602; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 592.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

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