Romani proverbs

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Romani is a minority language spoken by the Romani.

C[edit]

  • Či perel a phabaj kathar pesko kaš maj dur.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • "Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

E[edit]

  • Anda 'vresqe jakha sa dikhel anda pesqe khanc.
    • English equivalent: You see the splinter in another's eye but fail to see the beam in your own.
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 131. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

K[edit]

  • Kasavi vi e śej saj sar i dej.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • "Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and rarely."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 179. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Kon či kerel butji, godo te na xal.
    • English equivalent: He that will not work, shall not eat.
    • "Without due effort one is not entitled to the fruits of the work."
  • "Whatever you do, you've got to work for it and earn it. Whatever reward you get you've got to know that you've had your input into that success."
    • Jack Charlton Reflections on Success (1997)
    • Source for proverb and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 256. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

L[edit]

  • Lel the tacho pirrow, an' it's pars kaired.
    • English equivalent: Well begun, is half done.
    • "Starting properly ensures the speedy completion of a process. A – beginning is often blocked by one or more obstacles (potential barriers) the removal of which may ensure the smooth course of the process."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 228. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Lo premièr còp tomba pas l'aubre.
    • English equivalent: Little strokes fell great oaks.
    • "A difficult task, e. g. removing a person/group from a strong position, or changing established ideas cannot be done quickly. It can be achieved gradually, by small steps, a little at a time."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 252. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

N[edit]

  • Numaj dileno ćiriklo xindel po kujbo.
    • English equivalent: It is an ill bird that fouls its own nest; Don't wash your dirty linen in public.
    • "Why wantonly proclaim one's own disgrace, or expose the faults or weaknesses of one's kindred or people?"
    • "It is considered contemptible to defy the rule of solidarity by revealing facts harmful to the group one belongs to."
    • Source for first meaning: Proverbs of All Nations. W. Kent & Company (late D. Bogue). 1859. p. 109. 
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 466. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

O[edit]

  • O maćho o baro xàla e tikinen.
    • English equivalent: Men are like fish; the great ones devour the small.
    • "Small organizations or insignificant people tend to be swallowed up or destroyed by those that are greater and more powerful."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 1 July 2013. 
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 420. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

P[edit]

  • Phaori si duje xulajenqe te keres buti.
    • English equivalent: Nobody can serve two masters.
    • "One cannot serve two conflicting causes simultaneously. If this is attempted neither will be served properly."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 283. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Plaj plajeça ći maladōl, rrom rromesa.
    • English equivalent: A mountain never meets a mountain, but a man meets a man.
    • "There are some things/events that are impossible, like an encounter of mountains, but there is always a chance for people to meet. or Once can always find a possibility for revenge."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 213. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

See also[edit]